Growing in Godliness

  I.      Introduction

We’re starting a new book today that looks a lot like the last book we were studying.  We will study just the first few verses of 2nd Peter.

1st Peter was written to the early church, and the early church had big problems to overcome.  Many in the congregation were devout Jews, proud of their legalism and their rules of do this and don’t do that.  The other half were pagans and gentiles who didn’t believe in following rules at all.

Come to think of it, we have those same problems today in our churches.  Some people that tell us what we should and shouldn’t do.  Other churches that tell us that the bible is a good book but you shouldn’t believe everything you read.

2 Peter was written about 4 years later, and for a different purpose.  Peter knew his death was coming and he wanted to strengthen the churches before he was crucified.  Peter wanted to the church to be knowledgeable about their faith, and 2 Peter teaches us the foundations of our faith, the basics of our salvation, the basics of the scripture itself, the basics of how to recognize false teaching, and the basics of how to live while we wait for the certainty of the return of Christ.  slide2

In other words, 1 Peter was written to the church about the dangers outside the church; 2 Peter was written about the dangers inside the church.

II.      The Foundation of Our Faith, 2 Peter 1:1-2

Let’s look at just the introduction to see Peter’s purpose for this letter, in 2 Peter 1:1-2,

Simon Peter, a servant and apostle of Jesus Christ,

To those who through the righteousness of our God and Savior Jesus Christ have received a faith as precious as ours:

Grace and peace be yours in abundance through the knowledge of God and of Jesus our Lord.

This is more theologically complex than a simple, “Dear Church, it’s me, Peter.”  Peter describes the very foundation of Christianity, what it means to be a Christian.

First, Peter describes himself as servant or a bondservant, but that’s a little lightweight.  The Greek word is “doulos” and means one is who is devoted to another to the disregard of one’s own interest.  In other words, Peter is not just a follower of Jesus Christ, but one who has entirely given himself to the service of Christ.

Why does Peter do this?  I think the answer is the 2nd word, “apostle” of Jesus Christ.  Peter is an ambassador of the Gospel, a personal witness to Christ’s life and ministry, and specifically sent out with a mission.  In other words, Peter saw Christ in person and heard the Great Commission.  How could Peter do anything else but obey the Son of God?  While once a fisherman by trade, now Peter is the “rock” that Jesus Christ will build His church.

He’s addressing his letter to fellow believers, but he goes a step further and says these believers have received the same kind of faith as Peter did.  Peter’s faith isn’t a different kind of faith than you and I have, it’s the same.  The same faith Peter received is the same saving faith we receive, and it links us to our eternal life with Christ.  Notice that Peter says this faith is something we receive; it is a gift.  We cannot boast in our faith, that one person’s faith is stronger than another.  Faith, like life itself, is a gift from our heavenly Father.  And that faith must be centered on our God and Savior, Christ Jesus.  Some churches teach a weak form of faith, that Jesus was a good man, and perhaps what is true for you isn’t true for me.  And that’s not true, at least it is not for me.  The righteousness we have, like our faith and our life, is a gift from God through Jesus who is both God and Savior.  Apart from Him we can do nothing.

And with this knowledge that our faith and our righteousness is a gift comes grace and peace in abundance.  It’s a gift that we don’t earn, it’s given freely to us so that none of us are lacking in ability to do the work God has placed before us.  Any righteousness we have is “through” Christ, or “in” Christ, as 2 Peter 1:1 says.  We don’t have righteousness on our own.  We fall short.

And what do we do in response?  This grace and peace is ours through knowledge.  It is one thing to say, “yeah, sure, I trust Christ.”  But when the storms of life blow in and our boat is shaken, we are tempted to swim to shore on our own power.  That is because our faith and trust is weak.  To strengthen our faith, we must also strengthen our knowledge by reading God’s word and studying like we are today but also on our own.  Then we can understand God is in full control, from parting the Red Sea, through knocking down the walls of Jericho, to sending his holy and righteous son to take the punishment for our sins, to His love for all me throughout all time, to His love today for me.  With knowledge, we have a better understanding, our faith and trust is deeper, and grace and peace grows abundantly.

III.      The Resources of Our Faith, 2 Peter 1:3-4

So let’s go on to 2 Peter 1:3-4, where Peter discussed the importance of biblical knowledge in more detail;

His divine power has given us everything we need for a godly life through our knowledge of him who called us by his own glory and goodness.  Through these he has given us his very great and precious promises, so that through them you may participate in the divine nature, having escaped the corruption in the world caused by evil desires.

Peter tells us that this knowledge of Jesus, our study of the bible, provides not just righteousness, not just increased faith, not just grace and peace in abundance, but this knowledge is all the power we need to live the abundant life as well as be free from the corruption of this world.

Of course, we all sin.  It’s in our nature.  But let me contrast the response of 4 types of people, and you might think I’m making up these categories, but I’m not, they’re all listed in 1 Corinthians 3:1-3 –

  • The nonbeliever: this person may have a sense of right and wrong, but it’s not well-developed. He believes what the world tells him, that premarital or same-sex relations are ok, that lying and stealing are ok in the right circumstances, that truth is relative.  Non-believers can be very moral individuals, of course.  But their morals are not based on solid rock, they are based on shifting sands.  The New Testament term for “unbelievers” is “ψυχικός,” “psuchikós;” Natural, pertaining to the natural as distinguished from the spiritual.slide8
  • The baby Christian. We use this phrase for new believers who do not have a strong spiritual foundation yet.  They have professed their belief, but often still rely on the world for support.  They lack knowledge of the Lord, but the Holy Spirit continually prompts them from within to seek truth.  When times get tough, which they will, they are challenged in their faith: do they trust the world, or do they trust Jesus?  The Greek term for “infant believers” is σάρκινος or sárkinos; with propensities of the flesh unto sin; νήπιος nḗpios; an infant, child, baby without any definite limitation of age, usually referring to immaturity and lack of instruction.slide9
  • The backsliding Christian. This is an uncomfortable place to be, but it happens to all of us at some point in our lives where we have decided we have a valid excuse for not obeying those prompts by the Holy Spirit, and our disobedience grieves the Holy Spirit.  Eventually, one of two things happens; we either rededicate our obedience to the Lord and again seek His face, or the Lord gives us over to our desires and hardens our hearts.  Paul refers to these as “Carnal Believers,” σαρκικός or sarkikós; having a tendency to satisfy the flesh, implying sinfulness, sinful propensity, carnal.  These carnal Christians are disobedient or even in open rebellion.  By now, they should have matured, but they are stuck in their sin nature.  It’s hard to tell them apart from non-believers.  They are not destined for hell, but they are missing out on the abundant life.slide10
  • And finally, the mature Christian. These are πνευματικός or pneumatikós; persons who are spiritual, enlightened by the Holy Spirit.  The mature Christian, or perhaps I should say, the maturing Christian because nobody ever reaches full maturity.  Perhaps we can agree that Paul, who wrote much of the New Testament, was a mature Christian, but Paul says in his letter to the Philippians, chapter 3 verse 12,slide11

Not that I have already reached the goal or am already fully mature, but I make every effort to take hold of it because I also have been taken hold of by Christ Jesus.

Maturity is the goal and maturity is the journey.  Full maturity is the destination we never quite reach.

IV.      The Growth of Our Faith, 2 Peter 1:5-7

What is another word for this maturity?  The simple answer is “sanctification,” but then there’s a whole confusing definition on what sanctification means.  And this is important, but the English language is going to trip us up with how we are to understand God’s work in our lives.slide13

The Webster’s Dictionary defines sanctification as “to set apart for sacred use: to consecrate, to make free from sin: to purify.”  So we can understand the basic definition of sanctification as being separate, to be set apart.  In the Greek New Testament, the prefix “hag-“ is used for several words –

  • Hagiasmos: holiness, consecration, sanctification
  • Hagiosyne: holiness
  • Hagiazo: to sanctify, consecrate, treat as holy, purify
  • Hagios: set apart, holy, saint, sacred

The basic idea of the Greek prefix is to stand in awe of something or someone.  So let’s summarize it with this definition:

To be sanctified is to be made holy.

I’m going to follow a rabbit trail here, one of those enlightening observations that I think is important here.  I grew up Catholic and believed that “saints” were some long-dead super-Christians.  The apostles were saints, like St. Paul and St. Peter, and then there’s a whole mess of other super-Christians that become saints, like Saint Joseph of Arimathea is the patron saint of pallbearers, and Saint Isadore, the patron saint of farmers.  At the website Catholic Online, I found 149 patron saints listed.

But the word for saint comes from the same root prefix used for holy, sanctified, consecrated, set apart.  Romans 1:7, Paul addresses his letter to the church of Rome,

To all who are in Rome, loved by God, called as saints.

And in Colossians 1:2,

To the saints in Christ at Colossae, who are faithful brothers.

Saints are not some long-dead super-Christians.  Saints are the believers in Christ, members of the Church, our brothers and sisters.  Saints are you and me, set aside for God’s purposes.  Now, whether we walk in the manner of saints, well, that’s what the books of Ephesians and Colossians are all about.  The books of Ephesians and Colossians describe how saints ought to live, in unity, truth, love, wisdom, light, that saints ought to talk in a manner worthy of the Lord.  The behavior of the saints ought to reflect the name of the One whose name we bear.

The definitions of saint, set-apart, consecrated, holy, are all intertwined.  They all come from the same Greek prefix, and they all apply to all Christian believers.  To be sanctified is to be a saint.

So, are we sanctified?  Or are we being sanctified?  Or will we one day be sanctified? slide17

The answer is yes to all three, but the word “sanctification” is used in three different ways.  In fact, different churches use the word in different ways which cause misunderstanding among Christians when in fact we’re often saying the same thing.  If you choose to study the doctrine of sanctification, it’s important to realize how confusing it can be unless you realize all the different ways it can be used and misused.

Are we sanctified?  Absolutely, we have “Positional Sanctification.”  When we repent, we confess our belief that Jesus Christ is Lord.  At this very moment, we are redeemed.  We are cleansed by the shed blood of Jesus.  We have been forgiven of all our sins, and we are made holy before God through the righteousness of Jesus Christ.  This is a one-time event; we are saved.  Christ’s righteousness is imputed to us, and although we are sinners, we are pronounced “not guilty” as Christ has taken our punishment and we are made free.  The wrath of God for our sins has been satisfied.  We are once saved, always saved, our eternal life has begun from that moment.  Sometimes we call this “salvation,” but again, the English word doesn’t full capture the nuances of past, present and future.  I’ve usually used the word “justification” based on previous studies.

Sometimes this can be called “regeneration,” and this is also what we mean by “born again.”  I think “Positional Sanctification” is an accurate term that captures this one-time event.  Hebrews 10:10 refers to our “positional sanctification,”

And by that will, we have been made holy through the sacrifice of the body of Jesus Christ once for all.

When we have accepted the Lord Jesus Christ and we have “Positional Sanctification,” we are set apart from the world for God’s purposes.  The Holy Spirit enters the life of the new believer, and we are made free from the penalty of sin, once and forever.  We are sanctified.slide18

Are we being sanctified?  Absolutely.  We have “Progressive Sanctification.”  We are experiencing God’s plan for our lives.  Where we still find ourselves still in the world, the Holy Spirit continues to set us apart for God’s use.  This is what we usually mean by “spiritual maturity.”  While we are already holy and set apart, we are now becoming more holy and set apart.  This is where Christians that follow Christ find out we switched sides in the battle between good and evil.  Where once we were children of the devil without realizing it, now we have decided to follow Jesus and we are on a collision course with the world, we are opposed by Satan, and even our own sinful nature continues to fight against our new spiritual nature and the presence of the Holy Spirit within us.  2 Corinthians 7:1 says it this way,

Therefore, since we have these promises, dear friends, let us purify ourselves from everything that contaminates body and spirit, perfecting holiness out of reverence for God.

This is a confusing time for all believers, and this is when we learn to trust in Jesus more and more.  The conflict that we are engaged in makes us continually ask, “Does God know what is going on in my life?”  And as we grow in spiritual maturity, we begin to realize that the conflict we are experiencing is proof that God is at work.  We are continually asked, with higher and higher stakes, to decide if we want to place our trust in the world, or place our trust in God.  It is how God tests our faith and grows us spiritually.  When we first become a believer, we are free from the penalty of sin, but as we grow in spiritual maturity, we become free of the power of sin.  We are being sanctified.slide19

Will we be sanctified?  Absolutely.  Even though we have been sanctified, and are being sanctified, we will also be sanctified.  We have “Ultimate Sanctification,” or sometimes called “Glorification.”  This is the final stage in the salvation process, our future glorification as a believer.  We are glorified when we are transformed into the likeness of Christ and presented to the Lord as holy.  The presence of the Holy Spirit within us during spiritual maturity is the guarantee for our glorification, which includes the redemption of the body, the eternal inheritance that can never spoil, and deliverance from the future wrath of God.  We will be sanctified.  Where we once were free from the penalty of sin and then the power of sin, once we are glorified, we are free from the very presence of sin, forever and ever, amen.  1 John 3:2 says,

Dear friends, now we are children of God, and what we will be has not yet been made known. But we know that when Christ appears, we shall be like him, for we shall see him as he is.

Once a believer, once our faith in Jesus Christ is proclaimed, Steps 1 and 3 are guaranteed.  We are positionally sanctified and free of sin, and we are ultimately sanctified, glorified and dwelling in our eternal kingdom.  It’s the middle step, progressive sanctification, that is entirely voluntary.  It is our lifelong journey to become more Christ-like, recognize we cannot do it on our own, and grow our trust in the work of the Holy Spirit within us.slide20

  • We are saved, are being saved, will be saved
  • We are holy, are being made holy, will one day be holy
  • We are sanctified, are being sanctified, will be sanctified,

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So we are studying 2 Peter 1, I bet you forgot, didn’t you?  Let’s look at verses 5-7,

For this very reason, make every effort to add to your faith goodness; and to goodness, knowledge; and to knowledge, self-control; and to self-control, perseverance; and to perseverance, godliness; and to godliness, mutual affection; and to mutual affection, love.

This is a beautiful description of sanctification.  Which sanctification?  The second one, our Progressive Sanctification on the road to spiritual maturity.  It is completely voluntary, of course.  We already have the gift of salvation.    In the sanctification process, each step moves us closer to full spiritual maturity, but it is entirely up to us.  Just because the Holy Spirit shows us the path doesn’t mean we have to walk it.

But should we choose to answer the tests with our faith, we grow in spiritual maturity.

The first step is just to be good. If you are a new Christian with faith but without much knowledge of the bible, just try to be good.  Say nice things and do nice things.  It’s a great first step on the road to spiritual maturity.

But sometimes it’s not always apparent what being good is.  Let’s say I’m friends with a man who is having an affair.  Do I tell him I just want him to be happy?  Or do I tell him something else?  What would God want me to tell him?  To be good, we add to our knowledge, we study the bible to understand what it means.  With knowledge of God’s will, what it means to be good becomes more clear.

So, armed with a little knowledge, I blurt right out to my friend that I think he’s going to Hell because he’s having an affair.  And now my friend won’t return my calls.  And I realize that knowledge must still grow, and I learn that my words must both be true and kind.  In my new knowledge, I was so eager to be true that I forgot to be kind.  I learn self-control.  I apologize to my friend, I say I’m sorry, I was judgmental and rude in the way I said what I did, please forgive me.  My friend is still having an affair, but I so want him to understand the love of Jesus like I do that I persevere as his friend.  I understand that loving my neighbor means loving sinners, for we are all sinners, falling short of God’s glory.  My friend doesn’t come to Christ today, or tomorrow, but I persevere.

And I learn through this perseverance that Christ suffered in every single way, and died for me, and I understand a little of how a holy God amongst sinners must feel.  Jesus is Emmanuel, God with us.  And he’s not angry at us because of our sin, he’s among us because he wants to save us from our sin.  And I want to be more like Jesus and my life reflects the Holy Spirit living in me a little more each day.  Is my life demonstrating godliness?  Do others see me and do they see Christ in me?  I live my life of godliness among friends and family that are impacted by my life, and I am encouraged by my Christian brothers and sisters who share a mutual affection with me and pray for me and I can do the same for them and I realize that it’s not just me that has struggles, but my Christian brothers and sisters struggle, too, they are facing tests just like I am and I want to encourage them to be strong in the face of the enemy but the enemy isn’t other people but the principalities of this world and when there is persecution I realize my enemies, too, need to know the love of Christ and I realize that Christ loved me while I was still a sinner, that I understand now why I should love my enemies because my enemies, too, are made in the image of God and God so loved the world that He gave his only begotten son so that no one may perish but have everlasting life, and the best way to let my enemy know the love of Jesus is to be good to him and I realize in my spiritual journey I’m starting over at the beginning learning what it means to be good.

  V.      The Benefits of Our Faith, 2 Peter 1:8-11

It’s a lifelong process.  I am being sanctified, I’m being set apart for the Lord’s use, I am being made, slowly and sometimes struggling, into the image of Christ.  And even when I think I understand, I realize that my brain is probably only about 3½ lbs and will probably never be able to fathom all the mysteries of this universe that an omnipotent, omniscient God breathed into existence, or why God would look out across the expanse of time and space to give his grace and mercy to me, but the more I get to know God, the more I want to know God and His unfathomable love for me.

2 Peter 1:8-11 tells me that my sanctification will eventually lead to my glorification, my ultimate sanctification.

For if you possess these qualities in increasing measure, they will keep you from being ineffective and unproductive in your knowledge of our Lord Jesus Christ.  But whoever does not have them is nearsighted and blind, forgetting that they have been cleansed from their past sins.

Therefore, my brothers and sisters, make every effort to confirm your calling and election. For if you do these things, you will never stumble, and you will receive a rich welcome into the eternal kingdom of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ.

 

VI.      Conclusion

My life now is messy, but I have grace and peace in abundance through the knowledge God has provided.  My sanctification has a purpose.  One day, my visit to this planet will come to an end, and God will call me home.  My destination is secure, and the peace that surpasses all understanding washes over me when I think of the love that saved a wretch like me.  And though a life dedicated to growing in Christ puts me square in the middle of a spiritual conflict with the forces of evil, I know my God loves me and will never forsake me and one day I receive a welcome, not just any welcome, but a rich welcome, into an eternal kingdom with Christ Jesus.  And I hope, and I’m sure you do to, that when we arrive the words “Well done, good and faithful servant” will ring in our ears joyfully forever and ever.

To God be the glory.

Equipped to Live

   I.      Introduction

In our lifelong journey, we all want to be better than we are.

We want to be healthier.  We want to be taller.  We want to have more money.  We want to have more friends.  We want a nicer car.

And once we become Christian, we want to be a better Christian.  But I sometimes think we equate being a better Christian with being a better person.  And then we look around at all the perfect people in church and think, “I wish I could be like them, but there is so much garbage and filth in my past, I can never be as good as they are.”

Our perception of what it means to be a better Christian is flawed.  We are putting the cause before the effect, we are putting the “after” before the “before”.  Christians are not better people because we have Christ.  We are blessed because Christ has us.  And that is how we should live.

Peter is writing his letter in 1 Peter 4 to the early church, talking to those who have recently given their lives to Christ.  We have spoken before of this initial transformation of the young Christian; how they one lived as enemies of God and slaves to their own sin, but now chose to be slaves of Christ and begin their eternal lives.  Their eternal lives begin, not after death of the body, but the death of the old life.  We are “born again” into a new family.  But this can be a difficult transition; some new Christians may look back at their old lives and see their old friends partying and enjoying their old sin.  Let’s face it, sin is fun.  Satan doesn’t entice us to the dark side with healthy vegetables.slide2  He entices us with pumpkin cream cheese pancakes.Slide3.JPG

Let’s begin with the first part of our scripture today.  We are in 1 Peter 4, and we have 11 verses to cover.  There are about 35 separate topics in these 11 verses, but we’re going to focus on just 2 or 3 because, well, lunch.

II.      We Are Not Who We Were, 1 Peter 4:1-4

1 Peter 4:1-4,

Therefore, since Christ suffered in his body, arm yourselves also with the same attitude, because whoever suffers in the body is done with sin.  As a result, they do not live the rest of their earthly lives for evil human desires, but rather for the will of God.  For you have spent enough time in the past doing what pagans choose to do – living in debauchery, lust, drunkenness, orgies, carousing and detestable idolatry.  They are surprised that you do not join them in their reckless, wild living, and they heap abuse on you.

The chapter begins with “therefore” and when you see a “therefore,” we have to ask ourselves what it is there for.  This refers back to 1 Peter 3:18 which describe the life of Christ,

For Christ also suffered once for sins, the righteous for the unrighteous, to bring you to God. He was put to death in the body but made alive in the Spirit.

This was the purpose of Christ, to save lost sinners like you and me.  The death of Christ brought us forgiveness through grace in 3 ways –

  1. Christ’s death fulfilled the Old Testament Law of a sacrificial offering. We know that Jesus answered the Pharisees accusation by saying that Jesus did not come to abolish the law, but to fulfill it.  Therefore, an unblemished lamb was sacrificed.
  2. Second, Christ died as a propitiation for our sins. I confess I heard this term for years before I finally studied it, and it’s just a big word for a simple concept.  The bible says that God is a righteous and holy God, and God will not allow sin to go unpunished.  It’s not in His holy nature to say, “well, boys will be boys, I think I’ll let that one slide.”  No, God is a holy and righteous God, and God will punish every sin.  The wrath of God is a terrifying righteous thing.  And over the centuries, man has certainly given God plenty to be angry about.  None of us are innocent; Romans 3:23 says all have sinned and fallen short of the glory of God.  The Good News, the gospel itself, is that this wrath has already been satisfied when Jesus was put to death on the cross.  The wrath of God was satisfied when God’s own son was put to death.  That is what propitiation is – God’s wrath, satisfied.
  3. And third, Jesus was a substitution. A guilty man cannot take the punishment for anther guilty man.  Each must serve their own.  But Jesus was perfect, sinless, innocent.  He had no punishment of His own, so He is able to take our place.  And as God, Jesus can take away the sins of you and me.  Jesus can take away the sins of the world.

So this first “therefore” in 1 Peter 4 is powerful.  Jesus suffered and died to defeat sin with his body.  Therefore, we should arm ourselves, we should put on the whole armor of God, and put our sinful past behind us.  We are done with sin.  We are done with sin.

Sin might not be done with us, though.  Our old lives, our old friends, our old decisions, our old life choices want to follow us.  1 Peter 4:3-4,

For you have spent enough time in the past doing what pagans choose to do – living in debauchery, lust, drunkenness, orgies, carousing and detestable idolatry.  They are surprised that you do not join them in their reckless, wild living, and they heap abuse on you.

But we are done with sin, and we have armed ourselves in the Armor of God, have we not?  Our old friends are still living that life, and our old friends are surprised when we say we are done with sin.  And when we say, “no thanks, I have a new life in Christ,” they taunt us, they heap abuse on us.  Call us names and ridicule us.

And let’s be honest – when that taunting and name-calling comes from friends, it’s hard.  But the worst part is that the words echo in our old sinful selves, and we taunt and ridicule ourselves.  “Of course I’m not good enough to hang with those perfect Christians and their perfect spouses and their perfect 3.2 children.  I’m a drunkard, carouser, idolater.  Don’t they know what I’ve done?”  We put ourselves in a self-induced purgatory, too good to be with our old sinful friends, but not good enough to be with our new perfect Christian friends.

That’s Satan’s lies.  Our God is bigger than that.  Our God is bigger than any sinful thing we have ever done.  Our God is omniscient, seeing into our black sinful hearts.  Our God is omnipotent and brought His wrath upon our sin and utterly destroying it, separating us from our sin as far as the east is from the west.  Our God saw the worst we had to offer, and yet loved us so much and decided we were worth saving.  He sent His son to die for those sins so we don’t have to live them anymore.  We are free of that past.  And I don’t mean just the past from 20 years ago, but the past all they up to this morning until the moment you walked into this class.  You are an adopted child of the God, the Creator of All.  Your past is gone, yesterday is a closed door and you don’t live there anymore.

You see, we look in the mirror and we see what we have done.  But God looks at us, and He sees what He has done.  He has done a miracle in us.

III.      Judgement Day, 1 Peter 4:5-7

Our primary motivation for living our new eternal lives is gratitude and thanksgiving for what the Lord has done for us while we were still yet sinners.  Amazing grace, how sweet the sound that saved a wretch like me.  We know that Judgement Day is coming.  1 Peter 5-7,

But they will have to give account to him who is ready to judge the living and the dead.  For this is the reason the gospel was preached even to those who are now dead, so that they might be judged according to human standards in regard to the body, but live according to God in regard to the spirit. The end of all things is near. Therefore, be alert and of sober mind so that you may pray.

God gives us a choice on how we would like to be judged.  Our old sinful lives want to be judged by sinful human standards.  If our mind is on worldly things and we desire the approval of worldly people, and turn down the free gift of salvation offered through Christ Jesus, then God gives us what we want.  We are judged according to our deeds, our words, our thoughts.

Revelation 22 is the final chapter of the bible.  The end of history.  In Revelation 22:10-11, it says,

Then he (the angel) told me (John), “Do not seal up the words of the prophecy of this scroll, because the time is near.  Let the one who does wrong continue to do wrong; let the vile person continue to be vile; let the one who does right continue to do right; and let the holy person continue to be holy.”

The words “let him” implies “let him make his final decision.”  The God Almighty has provided a free choice.  After the Millennium Kingdom, The Book of Life is opened, and for those who have accepted Christ and their names are listed in the Book of Life, they proceed to the Judgement Seat, or Bema Seat of Christ, described in 2 Corinthians 5:10. As Christians, we are judged for our works while in this body, and we receive rewards for those deeds.  And there is no condemnation for those in Christ Jesus, for Christ died to pay the price for where we fall short.

Those that do not choose this gift of life and have decided to be judged on their own efforts and works, they appear at the Great White Throne described in Revelation 20 and judged exactly as they wished.  And everyone at this judgement, without exception, falls short of the glory of God and is thrown into the Lake of Fire.

So this “let him make his final decision” is God granting us our free will forever and ever.  God will not force us to accept His will, but that choice is final.  Dinesh D’Souza gave a speech at Liberty University on Friday night, and began it with this thought:slide10

https://twitter.com/DineshDSouza/status/787270366469222400

That is why Peter tells us,

The end of all things is near. Therefore, be alert and of sober mind so that you may pray.

The end of all things is near, but as mortals, we have short attention spans.  We forget our eternal destination and focus on the world around us.  Peter himself was an example of what happens when we take our eyes off of Jesus.  When Peter saw Jesus walking on the water, Peter’s eyes were on Jesus and Jesus called him.  And Peter walked on water!  But then Peter looked at the world around him and noticed how high the waves were and how deep the sea was and started to sink.  Peter’s salvation was still secure – Jesus reached in and caught him – but would Peter have sunk if his eyes remained on Jesus?

In the middle of going to work, shopping for groceries, exercising at the gym, we look at our watch and we never think, “What time was the world supposed to end?”  The end of the world seems less important to us than picking up the dry cleaning.  But the end of all things are near, and it’s not hard to imagine the last days becoming closer.  If you forget the end is near, turn on the TV and watch the news for 5 minutes.

So we keep that in mind when we pray, remembering the urgency that comes with the end of the world.  We need to be alert and focused.  But to have effective prayers, the NIV says we must be alert and sober.  The Holman Christian Standard Bible says serious and disciplined.  The NASB says sound judgement and sober spirit.  Others says clear-minded and self-controlled, serious and watchful, earnest and disciplined.  We must be focused on what God wants, not what we want.  We clear our minds and we seek God’s will.

I confess it is a mystery to me why God answers prayers.  He alone is worthy; He alone is just.  He doesn’t need my advice when I come to Him in prayer.  But the bible is clear that our prayers move God to act and that our prayers are like a fragrant aroma to Him.  It pleases God for us to pray.

So we pray for ourselves, we pray for our loved ones, we pray for our neighbors, we pray for our enemies.  We pray out of love for one another, that nobody should face the Great White Throne of Judgement without our Advocate in Christ Jesus at our side.  We pray out of love.

IV.      We Are Not Who We Will Become, 1 Peter 4:8-11

1 Peter 4:8-10,

Above all, love each other deeply, because love covers over a multitude of sins.  Offer hospitality to one another without grumbling.  Each of you should use whatever gift you have received to serve others, as faithful stewards of God’s grace in its various forms.

I think it is of no surprise that the word for “love” here is “agape,” the love that loves others so much that it is willing to sacrifice for others.  We are to sacrifice for each other with no hesitation or reservation.  I don’t think the NIV captures the essence of the word “deeply” here.  The Amplified bible calls it “intense and unfailing love for one another.”  This agape love is from God working through us and has nothing to do with how we feel.  Sometimes we don’t “feel” loving.  Love anyway.  Sometimes we feel irritated.  Love anyway, because love covers a multitude of sins, both their sins and especially our own sins.

What is agape love?  1 Corinthians 13:4-7 tells us exactly what love is and what is not.  As an engineer, I’m sort of spreadsheet oriented and I’ll eventually have the entire bible categorized properly in a giant spreadsheet like it should be, but for now, here’s a spreadsheet on love that you can stick on your refrigerator:

1 Corinthians 13:4-7
Attitudes Actions
Love is Love is not Love does Love does not
Patient Jealous Rejoice with truth Brag
Kind Arrogant Bears all things Act rudely
Provoked Believes all things Seek its own
Hopes all things Keep a record of wrongs
Endures all things Rejoice in unrighteousness

slide13Love is easy, and love is complicated.  But it’s worthwhile to reflect on this list.  It’s easy to say we love someone, but harder to actually love someone in action and in attitude.

For instance, the very first words of this list is, “Love is patient, love is kind.”  I don’t know about you, but if this is a definition of love, I didn’t even make it past the first two words.  I’m not always patient.  What’s that old joke, God grant me patience, and grant it to me now?  The things in my life that are my biggest source of frustration seem to be life-long battles.  And I once thought of myself as patient, but I have a better understanding.  Not that I’ve been able to put it into practice, but at least I have a better understanding of where I fall short.

How long does patience last?  A couple of hours?  A week?  A year?  I think any number does the word “patience” an injustice.  In Genesis 18, The Lord is going to wipe Sodom from the earth, but Abraham asks God if the Lord will destroy with righteous along with the wicked.  Abraham starts by asking if 50 righteous people are found for the Lord to spare the city, and the Lord agrees.  Through a serious of humorous bargaining, Abraham then tries to make it easier on himself, so he asks if 45 people are enough.  Then 40, then 30, 20, and then 10.  And the Lord agrees.  But no righteous people were found; Lot and his family were spared, but not because of their righteousness.

Fast forward to 2 Peter 3:9,

The Lord is not slow about His promise, as some count slowness, but is patient toward you, not wishing for any to perish but for all to come to repentance.

When Peter says, “The end of all things is near,” and then his next letter says “The Lord is not slow about keeping His promise,” I think of 1 Corinthians 13 saying “love is patient” and John 3:16 that says, “For God so loved the world” that over 4000 years have passed since the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah.  But the end of times hasn’t yet arrived.  So patience is at least 4000 years if you love someone.  To truly understand patience, we must be patient.

As for “Love is kind,” has anyone ever said an unkind word?  It’s hard to keep our tongue in check.  James 3:6 has these kind words to say about our ability to control our tongue:

The tongue also is a fire, a world of evil among the parts of the body. It corrupts the whole body, sets the whole course of one’s life on fire, and is itself set on fire by hell.

Now I understand why some monks take a vow of silence.  Ouch.  I have had some progress in this regard by remembering James 3:9, just 3 verses later:

With the tongue we praise our Lord and Father, and with it we curse human beings, who have been made in God’s likeness.

The thing to remember about how we express love and to who and what attitude we have while we do it … well, that seems to sum up our purpose while we are visiting this big blue marble in preparation for our eternal kingdom.  We are to love our family; we are to love our friends.  We are to love our neighbors.  We are to love our enemies.  In short, we are to lead a life of love that demonstrates the light of Christ in us.

What comes out of our mouth reflects what is really inside our hearts.  When I read about some celebrity or sports figure apologize for something they said, I’ve been seeing this phrase being used, “That’s not who I am.”

A NYPD detective abusing an Uber driver, caught on tape.  “I let my emotions get the better of me…. That’s not who I am.”slide16

Marco Rubio when he was running for President implied that Donald Trump had a small… something.  It was insulting to a man.  But Rubio’s apology? “It’s not who I am and I shouldn’t have said that.”Slide17.JPG

Isaiah Crowell, running back for the Cleveland Browns, after a police shooting death of two black me, posted a graphic picture of a cop with his throat slit.  He apologized, donated a game check to the Dallas Fallen Officer Association and said, “That’s not who I am.”slide18

Dani Mathews, 2015 Playmate of the Year, took a picture of a heavier woman who was naked in a gym shower, with the caption, “If I can’t unsee this, then you can’t either.”  After an uproar, she apologized saying she accidentally posted the photo and … “that’s not who I am.”Slide19.JPG

I find the trend disturbing; people are essentially claiming they are innocent – “that wasn’t me.”  Like somehow if I robbed a bank at gunpoint and say, “That wasn’t me, I don’t rob banks.”Slide20.JPG

But it was them.  And as Christians, we certainly are not immune to saying ugly things.  The only reason it comes out of you is because it was in you.  The only way to keep it from being in us is to fill ourselves with the Holy Spirit so full there isn’t room for our own iniquities.  And if something ugly comes out of our mouths, then we apologize and say, “That was me.  I am sorry.  I am trying to be better but I still often fall short of the glory of God.”slide21

Our scripture verses today end with 1 Peter 4:11,

If anyone speaks, they should do so as one who speaks the very words of God. If anyone serves, they should do so with the strength God provides, so that in all things God may be praised through Jesus Christ. To him be the glory and the power for ever and ever. Amen.

When we profess to be a Christian, every word we speak represents Christ on earth, for we are Christ’s ambassador to our brothers and sisters in Christ, to our family and friends, to our neighbors, to non-believers.   Every word we say reflects our heart and reflects Christ, so we should speak slowly and choose each and every word carefully.  Once you say them, you can’t take them back.

  V.      Conclusion

Our sanctification process is to be a better Christian daily.  We look in that mirror and see what we’ve done or what we’ve said, but God sees what He has done.  We want those two visions to be the same; we want to see what God sees.  And we cannot do this on our own, for we battle daily with our sinful nature and the principalities of this world.

Some days, I hate to admit, that old sinful nature is going to get the upper hand briefly, and we are going to say or do something that hurts somebody.  It will be unloving because we didn’t fill ourselves up with goodness, and we will reflect badly on ourselves and be a poor ambassador for Christ.

Don’t beat yourself up too badly.  It will happen to all of us sooner than later.  Some sooner than others.  None of us are perfect.  And our closest family and friends?  They, too, will say or do something that is hurtful.  But our key verse that wraps all of this together for us is 1 Peter 4:8,

Above all, love each other deeply, because love covers over a multitude of sins.

Because of the love our family has for us, we can fail and it’s ok.  Love covers a multitude of sins.  Because of the love we have for others, they can fail and it’s ok.  Love covers a multitude of sins.

Because God so loved the world and gave his Son as a perfect sacrifice, a perfect propitiation, a perfect substitution, we can fail, and He still loves us.

Love covers a multitude of sins.

To God be the glory.

Living as Strangers

  I.      Introduction

Be in the world, not of the world.

This phrase isn’t in the bible, but it is a concept expressed by a great many verses.  In John 17:14-15, the night Jesus was betrayed, Jesus prays to the Father for all believers,

I have given them your word and the world has hated them, for they are not of the world any more than I am of the world.  My prayer is not that you take them out of the world but that you protect them from the evil one.

But what does this look like in our lives today?  How do we put this into practice?

II.      We Are Strangers, 1 Peter 2:11-12

I’m going to talk about my travels for a bit.  I have been blessed in a job that gave me the opportunity so see much of God’s creation.  My first overseas trip was to Florence, Italy.  I marveled at the Duomo, walked streets that were 2000 years old, the same streets ancient Romans walked in the days of Jesus.  I saw amazing examples of Renaissance art.

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But I am not Italian.  I was a visitor.

In 1997, I moved to Singapore the day before Chinese New Year.  It’s like moving to downtown Houston on Christmas Eve and wondering where all the people were.  I visited a Christian church that was 99.9% Chinese, and somehow the people in the church noticed me.  I gave my life to Christ there.  I saw a beautiful modern city with streets that were safe to walk in and explored the complicated history of the influence of the Malaysian people and British imperialism.

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But I am not Chinese.  I was a visitor.

Three years ago, I spent almost a year in Scotland.  I played golf on a links course where some of the oldest golf clubs reside.  I ate haggis, nips, and tatties, and I enjoyed it.  I saw musicians on street corners playing bagpipes.  I almost bought a kilt.  After nearly a year, I could almost understand what they were saying.

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But I am not Scottish.  I was a visitor.

If you’ve lived your whole life in Texas, then you’ve probably see the Houston Museum of Natural Science and the Butterfly Museum and perhaps you’ve made the drive up towards Brenham in the spring to see the bluebonnets like no place else in the world.  Perhaps you’ve stood on Galveston Beach and wondered how far the ocean stretched, or driven to San Antonio and marveled at the hundreds of miles of flat prairies as far as you can see.

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I consider myself a Texan.  I consider myself an American.  I consider myself an inhabitant of this big blue marble that travels around a small yellow sun.

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And yet, I am still a visitor.  This is not my home.

We should be good guests, enjoy this world, appreciate its beauty, and admire God’s handiwork.  But like good visitors, we take nothing from this trip with us.  We will eventually leave it all behind.

There’s nothing wrong, and everything right, with appreciating everything God has provided for our stay.  But if we have a limited, personal, selfish view of Christianity, we only look at the here and now.  Will being a good Christian help me in my relationships?  Will it bring me better health, a better job, success and prosperity?  Will I feel better?

But if our focus is on this world and how Christianity provides a more fulfilling life, then we do not appreciate that we are visitors.  We try to be permanent guests, we fear death instead of recognizing that our eternal life has already begun and eventually we move to a far, far better place.  1 Corinthians 15:19 says it this way:

If our hope in Christ is good for this life only and no more, then we deserve more pity than anyone else in all the world.

How then shall we live?  Our scripture today is 1 Peter 2 beginning in verse 11,

I appeal to you, my friends, as strangers and refugees in this world!  Do not give in to bodily passions, which are always at war against the soul.  Your conduct among the heathen should be so good that when they accuse you of being evildoers, they will have to recognize your good deeds and so praise God on the Day of his coming.

God has a purpose for our lives if we recognize we are visitors.  We are ambassadors of Christ.  This world offers beauty and wonder, but if we grab it and hold on to this world at all costs, we are to be pitied.  These worldly possessions are always at war against the soul which is destined for a far better destination.  We live for that day, and our behavior should be exemplary.  The pagan world will see our lives and mock us now, but God has a purpose.

If you are in a position where people mock you, don’t give up hope.  Be aware that God using you to demonstrate His love.

 

III.      Submission, Not Rebellion, 1 Peter 2:13-17

How, then, shall we live?  We lead lives of quiet submission.  We lead our lives in the freedom that Christ provides, but also in obedience to His teaching so the world sees Christ in us.  Let’s continue to 1 Peter 2:13-17 –

Submit yourselves for the Lord’s sake to every human authority: whether to the emperor, as the supreme authority, or to governors, who are sent by him to punish those who do wrong and to commend those who do right.  For it is God’s will that by doing good you should silence the ignorant talk of foolish people.  Live as free people, but do not use your freedom as a cover-up for evil; live as God’s slaves.  Show proper respect to everyone, love the family of believers, fear God, honor the emperor.

 

Submission.  I don’t know about you, but submission goes against my grain.  I want things my way, I want to go the way I want to go, and I don’t want anybody telling me what to do.  Peter’s admonition, though is that we should submit ourselves.

What is submission?  What does it mean to submit to another?  Peter uses the Greek word hypotassō, and it’s a military term meaning “to arrange in a military fashion under the command of a leader.”  When it’s used in a non-military way, it means “a voluntary attitude of giving in, cooperating, assuming responsibility, and carrying a burden.”  I think we give the word “submission” a bad rap because we think it means something worse.

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Submission is Opposite of Submission is Too much submission is
Acceptance Arrogance Wimpy
Willing Resistance Cowardly
Humble Pride Spinelessness
Respect Conceit Slavery

Submission is a voluntary action, not a surrendering or giving up, but a giving in and providing support to others.  True Christian submission is an awesome display of the power of Christ living in us.

Peter is living as a subject of the Roman Empire. The Romans at this time were not especially kind to Christians; Christians who confessed Christ as their Lord were often punished or killed for treason for not obeying the Roman Emperor. The Romans were suspicious of early Christians, suspecting them of insurrection and planning to overthrow the empire. After all, they had their own king.  So in a brutal repressive society, how do you reconcile that with the Christian teachings of freedom in Christ? Did this freedom allow rebellion?  Peter points to the Lord Jesus Christ to see how we are to live.

Let’s start with verse 13,

“Submit yourselves for the Lord’s sake to every human authority.”

I know I rebel in a hundred little ways, I have a natural tendency toward passive aggressiveness.  But here are ten simple words that we all might want to rebel against, but what does Peter call us to do? Submit ourselves. Why?  Not for our sake, but to further the Lord’s work.

Not because those in authority can crush us, but because it is the Lord’s will (and we’ll get to more of this in a moment). To who do we submit ourselves? To every human authority.  God calls us to voluntarily and cheerfully submit to our legal authorities.  We are to obey the law and to be good citizens.  And we do this, not because the government is a huge bureaucracy that can throw us into jail, but because we are to be obedient to Christ.

While our governmental authority seems to be headed off a cliff away from God’s will, in reality, God creates governments to accomplish His will, whether that government is aware of it or not.  Government over us keeps us out of anarchy. In Romans 13:1-7, Paul tells us:

Everyone must submit himself to the governing authorities, for there is no authority except that which God has established. The authorities that exist have been established by God. Consequently, he who rebels against the authority is rebelling against what God has instituted, and those who do so will bring judgment on themselves. For rulers hold no terror for those who do right, but for those who do wrong. Do you want to be free from fear of the one in authority? Then do what is right and he will commend you. For he is God’s servant to do you good. But if you do wrong, be afraid, for he does not bear the sword for nothing. He is God’s servant, an agent of wrath to bring punishment on the wrongdoer. Therefore, it is necessary to submit to the authorities, not only because of possible punishment but also because of conscience. This is also why you pay taxes, for the authorities are God’s servants, who give their full time to governing. Give everyone what you owe him: If you owe taxes, pay taxes; if revenue, then revenue; if respect, then respect; if honor, then honor.

Peter teaches us to submit to the government because the government is teaching us right from wrong.  Submission to authority, cheerfully and willingly.  Be good subjects of the Roman Empire. That doesn’t mean we can’t use legal, peaceful means of bringing change in our government. Certainly as good Christian witnesses we should seek to change those government laws that violate God’s laws; our Christian duty is to be agents of change in this world, but we are to do it within the framework of existing governmental laws.

Are there any exceptions to this rule? Absolutely. We must be careful to set aside our personal desires and goals; those goals are subject to government.  But God’s goals supersedes those of government.  Peter was faced with this exact circumstance in Acts 4:18-20. The Jewish leaders were disturbed that Peter and John were spreading the message of Christ and ordered them to stop, but Peter chose to obey God instead of man:

Then they called them in again and commanded them not to speak or teach at all in the name of Jesus. But Peter and John replied, “Judge for yourselves whether it is right in God’s sight to obey you rather than God. For we cannot help speaking about what we have seen and heard.”

So we are called to follow authority and show respect, but not at the expense of following God’s will.

1 Peter 2:15,

For it is God’s will that by doing good you should silence the ignorant talk of foolish men.

Like it or not, a government agent is an angel of wrath, to enforce right and wrong.  When we submit to authority, Peter tells us that silence foolish people.  When we’re argumentative and rebellious, we are poor examples of Christ.

Verse 16,

Live as free men, but do not use your freedom as a cover-up for evil; live as servants of God.

Jesus came to set His followers free, but this is not a freedom to do evil. In order to be free of sin, we voluntarily become slaves of God. Using our freedom to conceal evil actions is hypocritical.  The world only grudgingly gives respect to Christians, and quickly condemns us when our hypocrisy shows.  Expressing our freedom from sin means we obey every legal authority and not our own selfish, rebellious heart. We are to lead holy lives, set apart lives, and law abiding lives.

Verse 17,

Show proper respect to everyone: Love the brotherhood of believers, fear God, honor the king.

I find these distinctions interesting.  We are to show “proper” respect to everyone, but proper respect isn’t equal respect.  The word used here is timaō and it means to estimate the value or recognize the worth of that person.  We show respect to “everyone” because after all, everyone is created in God’s image.  They have intrinsic value as people.slide19

To our brotherhood of believers, though, we show more than respect. We show love, the same kind of love Christ showed for us. The word used is agapaō, or agape love, and it means to welcome, to entertain, to be fond of, to love dearly, to be well pleased, to be content with. Christ showed agape love to us to model, and we are to show this agape love to our brothers and sisters.  Submission in the church, and submission even within this bible class leads to the purest kind of love, where we are genuinely concerned about each other and set aside our own vain attitudes.  We are not in competition with each other about who can be the best Christian. Or the worst Christian, for that matter.slide20

And to God, we show “fear.”  Not a scared kind of fear, the word used is phobeō and means to be awestruck, to treat with reverential obedience.  Our God created the heavens and the earth and if He so wished He could smite us so hard we’d be smitten.  We are thankful for the grace He shows us through Jesus that we don’t get the punishment we deserve; Jesus has already taken our place.slide21

slide22And to the king and to people in authority, we are to show honor. The word “timao” is used here again; it means to recognize the value of the person, to respect and honor.  Note that it says we are to fear the Lord but give honor to the king. Jesus made the same distinction in Matthew 22:21 when the Pharisees asked Him if it was right to pay taxes.  Jesus replied,

Give to Caesar what is Caesar’s, and to God what is God’s.

We give our authorities respect and obedience, but to God we give reverence and worship.

 

IV.      Extreme Submission, 1 Peter 2:18-20

Next, in verse 18, Peter addresses a particularly difficult subject, slavery.

Slaves, submit yourselves to your masters with all respect, not only to those who are good and considerate, but also to those who are harsh.

Where’s that freedom Christ promised? Many early believers were slaves. Educated slaves, sometimes, but still slaves. They served as teachers, doctors, administrators, musicians, craftsmen. Over the centuries, Christian influence about our equal worth as God’s children eventually led to the abolition of slavery, but opposition to the slavery during the time of the Roman Empire would be seen as an insurrection and would certainly bring the wrath of Rome, crushing the early Christian movement.

Peter’s not justifying slavery here in any circumstances.  What he is saying is that, regardless of our circumstances we are to be obedient to those who have authority over us.  If a Christian is in slavery, the Christian is to submit, to obey their master.  We have an innate repulsion to this idea, that slavery is wrong and we should oppose it. And while that is true, slavery shows us an extreme example of how we are to behave as Christians. We are to submit and show respect. Not grudgingly and with an attitude, but respectfully and willingly.  We can extend this instruction to our workplace, to our bosses who are in authority over us.  We are to obey our bosses, be a good example of Christ living within us.  The natural tendency of the unsaved person is to gripe, to badmouth, to fight back.  As a spirit-filled Christian, we learn to submit and let God fight our battles for us.

Verse 19 tells us suffering in slavery or suffering in our job in obedience to Christ brings favor with God.

For it is commendable if a man bears up under the pain of unjust suffering because he is conscious of God.

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The word is “charis” and can be translated commendable, finds favor, a reward, good will, but also means grace. As a slave to God, we submit unconditionally, we love unconditionally, we obey unconditionally. How can we do otherwise?  How can we set rules for when and how God shows us grace? We can’t of course; as we learn to submit unconditionally, we learn how God’s grace is provided to us.  Jesus submitted unconditionally; through His submission, God brought salvation to all humanity.  Jesus certainly had the power to resist, to punish the men responsible, but instead Jesus submitted to authority and at the same time showed us how to forgive those who oppress us.

 

Verse 20 also gives us another reason to submit.

But how is it to your credit if you receive a beating for doing wrong and endure it? But if you suffer for doing good and you endure it, this is commendable before God.

If we do wrong and we’re punished, well, we deserve it.  If I go out to the parking lot and spray paint a bunch of cars and get caught, will anybody respect me for the way I bravely take my punishment?  No, they will say I deserved it.  But if I am innocent and I’m punished, by freely submitting to those in authority, God will find favor in me.  If we spend all day at work surfing ESPN for the latest fantasy football stats and our boss comes in and chews us up, well, we deserved it.  But if we are innocent in these things and our boss treats us harshly, we are to endure it patiently.  We show respect because this brings glory to God.  This is a true test of our faith.  Being a good example when things are going well is easy.  God’s not impressed.  Being a good example when under stress or persecution?  God will find favor in us.

 

  V.      Our Example is Christ, 1 Peter 2:21-25

We are called to do this as Christians. Verse 21 says,

To this you were called, because Christ suffered for you, leaving you an example, that you should follow in his steps.

Christ suffered unjustly for us. When we think about our suffering, think about the suffering of Jesus.  The Romans punished Jesus, flogged Him, and crucified Him to die a slow death on the cross.  What did Jesus do to deserve it?  When our boss tells us to work late, compare that to the suffering of Jesus.  Why do we grumble over minor afflictions when Jesus submitted willingly to crucifixion?  What are the things that irritate you the most?  Coworkers?  Money?  That’s your suffering, yet compare it to the suffering of Jesus.  Who suffered more, you or Jesus?  Who complains more?  Yet verse 21 tells us to follow in His steps. Here’s how Jesus set an example for us when He suffered in verse 22:

He committed no sin, and no deceit was found in his mouth.

Jesus suffered and died without a grumble, without a complaint and without a sin.  Because Jesus was innocent, He can take our blame for us.  If Jesus was a sinner, the punishment He received would be His own.  But Jesus is sinless and can offer to take our punishment for us.  Because He can do that, He is our savior.  When we suffer, when we are punished unjustly, Jesus is also our role model, our example. No deceit in our mouth, we hold our tongue and do not condemn.

Verse 23,

When they hurled their insults at him, he did not retaliate; when he suffered, he made no threats. Instead, he entrusted himself to him who judges justly.

As the son of God, Jesus could threaten to destroy His oppressors.  He could have said, “I’ll get you my pretty and your little dog, too.”  Instead, Jesus left us an example.   He committed himself to trusting God to judge. Jesus showed us that a person can be in the will of God, be loved by God, and still suffer unfairly.  Don’t fall for that “feel good” brand of Christianity that says trust in God and you will never suffer.  It’s not biblical; it doesn’t reflect the life that Jesus gave for us.  Instead, unjust suffering at work, at home, in pain or poor health, in loss of a loved one, unjust suffering gives us an opportunity to showcase the Holy Spirit within us.  No threats, no insults, no retaliation, no harsh words.  We trust God will right all wrongs at the Day of Judgment.  By the time Peter wrote this book, Peter had been preaching the gospel for 30 years and the Holy Spirit has made him into a true man of God.  Where once Peter took up a sword to defend Jesus, now Peter preaches submission to authorities.  This is how we lead as Christians; we lead by submission.

The last two verses, Peter reminds us why Jesus is our example.  It’s because Jesus is more than just an example. Jesus is the savior we all need. In verse 24, Peter reminds us what Jesus did for us and why Jesus could do what none of us can.  Jesus is more than “just a good man.”

He himself bore our sins in his body on the tree, so that we might die to sins and live for righteousness; by his wounds you have been healed.

Jesus did not die as a martyr.  Jesus died as a savior.  He took the punishment for the sins we commit.  Christ was wounded so we might be healed.  Christ died so that we might live.  Our sinful lives died with the crucifixion of Christ; we are no longer slaves to sin, but willing and righteous slaves to God.  One day we will have glorified bodies, but right now, even some of God’s most favored servants suffer physically.  By the wounds of Jesus, we will be healed of this physical suffering.

And in verse 25, Peter says,

For you were like sheep going astray, but now you have returned to the Shepherd and Overseer of your souls.

Every lost sinner is ignorant, lost, foolish, wandering, in danger, and unable to help ourselves.  We have wandered into the wilderness without a Shepherd to protect us.  Before we accept Christ, we have a mistaken belief that we can save ourselves, that we are all we need, yet we spend our entire lives trying to figure out why that hole in our soul won’t fill up with toys, entertainment, knowledge, service.  It’s only when we recognize that we cannot do it on our own and accept Jesus that we truly begin to live in Him. Jesus is our good shepherd; Jesus watches over us and protects us, and nobody can snatch us out of His all-powerful, ever-loving arms.

Augustine of Hippo in 387AD said it this way –

Thou hast made us for thyself, O Lord, and our heart is restless until it finds its rest in thee.

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VI.      Conclusion

Be a good visitor to this big blue marble.  Show the love that Christ showed to you, not because you deserved it, but because you didn’t deserve it. And through our good behavior, silence the foolish talk of the world.  For we know Christ lives through us and in us and we can do all things through Christ our savior.

To God be the glory.