Thankful

I. Introduction

We’re almost complete with our study of 2nd Samuel; Chris has the final lesson next week before we move into 3rd Samuel.

Today’s lesson is a little different from the messy soap opera we’ve been studying. Today we pause while David sings a song of praise to the Lord.

II. Similarities to Psalm 18

We know David wrote many of the Psalms, and today’s verses are essentially a psalm, a song of praise and worship. In fact, it’s nearly identical to Psalm 18. Let’s just look at both side-by-side, just the first 6 verses –

2 Samuel 22 Psalm 18
“The Lord is my rock, my fortress and my deliverer;

my God is my rock, in whom I take refuge,

my shield and the horn of my salvation.

He is my stronghold, my refuge and my savior—

from violent people you save me.

“I called to the Lord, who is worthy of praise,

and have been saved from my enemies.

The waves of death swirled about me;

the torrents of destruction overwhelmed me.

The cords of the grave coiled around me;

the snares of death confronted me.

I love you, Lord, my strength.

The Lord is my rock, my fortress and my deliverer;

my God is my rock, in whom I take refuge,

my shield and the horn of my salvation, my stronghold.

I called to the Lord, who is worthy of praise,

and I have been saved from my enemies.

The cords of death entangled me;

the torrents of destruction overwhelmed me.

The cords of the grave coiled around me;

the snares of death confronted me.

Well, one or two lines are the same.

III. My Rock and My Fortress

It begins with “The Lord is my rock, my fortress, and my deliverer.” David uses metaphors here that shows how powerful, how impregnable, how safe it is to be within the Lord’s will.

Slide3David throughout his eventful life relied on the Lord often, he trusted in the Lord for everything. We know through our studies of 1st and 2nd Samuel that for at least 10 years, David was pursued by Saul and his army and attempted to kill David on at least 5 separate occasions. And after he became king, David had to defeat the Philistines, the Ammonites, the Syrians, the Moabite, the Edomites, the Northern Lights, the Friday Nights, and the Stalagmites and the Stalactites. Well, ok, not those last 4. And after he became king, the pretenders to the throne by Ishbosheth, Absalom, and Sheba. Despite being chose by God to lead the kingdom of Israel, David’s life as king was filled with danger. What David knew, though, was that nothing could stop the will of the Lord. David was safe and protected inside the fortress of the Lord.

When you think of the Lord’s selection of David as king, what preconceptions might you have? That the path to be king was easy? That David’s foes would be minimal, that David would lead the people of Israel into decades of peace and prosperity? That everybody would love and admire and praise David?

David’s life was anything but peaceful. And a great many of the people of Israel sided against David when Absalom tried to overthrow David. But it wasn’t David who won the battles. David did only what the Lord asked him to do, and then David relied on the Lord. Every victory that David had, David gave credit to the Lord.

Slide4The Lord is our rock, our fortress. He is our mountain of strength, and he loves each and every one of us. The Lord longs for a relationship with us, and He tells us in Psalm 141 and Revelation 8 that our prayers to the Lord are pleasing incense to Him. Why the God who breathed the universe into existence is pleased to hear from us when we pray is a mystery to me, but he tell us the prayers of the righteou, those that dwell in Christ Jesus, are powerful. Our prayers with the faith of a mustard seed can move the mountain that is our God.

David knew this and gave credit to the Lord for every victory in his life. Despite David’s skill with a sling, despite David’s ability to command armies, David knew that his own power was weak compared to the all-surpassing power of the Lord God. The Lord is our rock, our fortress, our deliverer. The Lord is our shield and the horn of our salvation. The Lord is our savior.

IV. The Lord is Worthy to Be Praised

David goes on in verse 4 that he called out to the Lord, who is worthy of praise. These words from David, in this context, humbles me. I remember a few years ago going through a difficult time. An extended, difficult time. It seemed to me at the time that it would never end. And in the middle of the trial, my faith was strong.

Slide5.JPGBut after a couple of years, my faith wavered. Not that I ever doubted the goodness of the Lord, but I started wondering if maybe the Lord needed some help. And verses that are not in the bible, such as “The Lord helps those who help themselves” would come to mind. I thought patience was something I excelled at, but during this period I realized that the patience of God greatly exceeded my own. It was His will that the trials continued for me. Those days were hard. And I wish I could say that during this time that my first inclination was to praise the Lord for the trials I was going through.

Perhaps you’ve felt the same about something, or many somethings, going on in your life. Somebody is angry with you and you can’t seem to resolve it. You have a medical issue that never seems to get better. You have a family member that has passed despite your pleas to the Lord. You have a wayward child that has turned his or her back on you and the church, and you continue to pray but you aren’t seeing results. Is your first thought to praise the Lord?

Slide6Recently my wife and I went to the AD Players to see “God’s Favorite,” a Neil Simon play. It’s a modern retelling of the book of Job. You remember Job, he’s the guy in the bible that has more patience than me. In chapter 1 of Job, Job is introduced as “the greatest man among all the people of the East.” And God allows Satan to completely destroy Job’s life. A local tribe of enemies attacked and stole his oxen and donkeys, then killed all of Job’s servants. Then fire fell from the sky and burned up the sheep and the remaining servants. The another local tribe attacked and stole his camels and killed those servants, then a mighty wind blew down the house of his oldest son and all of Job’s children were killed. And Job finds out about all of these calamities within the space of minutes.

I don’t know what your first reaction would be, but Job’s reaction was amazing. Job 1:20-21,

At this, Job got up and tore his robe and shaved his head. Then he fell to the ground in worship and said:
“Naked I came from my mother’s womb,
and naked I will depart.
The Lord gave and the Lord has taken away;
may the name of the Lord be praised.”

Job praised God. If calamities happened to me like that, I’m not sure I can honestly say that praise is the first thing that comes to mind.

Just like David. David praises the name of the Lord.

V. A Man After God’s Own Heart

You know, each chapter we studied in Samuel about the life of David opened up new insights about David and new understandings about God. But throughout all of our study of David’s life, we often asked the question, “why was David considered a man after God’s own heart?”

Slide8We know David was a mess. As he amassed power, he amassed wives. He collected concubines like some people collect those little thimbles from roadside gift shops. He was a terrible father, a terrible uncle. David was seemingly indifferent to the rape of his daughter Tamar, letting Amnon go free which enraged David’s son Absalom to kill Amnon. Then later Absalom tried to overthrow David before being killed by Joab. And who can forget David’s greatest sin, the adultery with Bathsheba leading to the murder of her husband Uriah? So it’s natural to ask, Why was David considered a man after God’s own heart?

David’s messy life was just that – a messy life. I’m guessing your life isn’t a fairy tale, either, and I know mine is not. Scripture says we are all sinners, every one of us, including King David. What sets David apart is not his poor fatherhood skills or his affair with Bathsheba. What set him apart is David’s repentance and submission to God. What was David’s heart like that God found so appealing?

A. David Had a Faithful Heart

David had absolute faith in the Lord. The history of the kings that came after David were a mixed lot, and so many of them included phrases like “did evil in the sight of the Lord” or “did what was right in their own eyes.” How many times did the people of Israel stay? They sometimes worshipped the Asherah pole. After Moses came down from Mt. Sanai, the people had made a golden calf to worship. But David never wavered in his faith. He worshiped Jehovah God and no other. David wrote in Psalm 23:1,

“The Lord is my shepherd, I shall not want.”

David recognized that he needed God, he was dependent on God to provide and protect him. The Lord God was David’s rock, David’s fortress, David’s deliverer, David’s shield, David’s horn of salvation, David’s stronghold, David’s refuge. David’s savior.

B. David Had a Seeking Heart

David actively sought God’s will for his life. Look at these scriptures –
1 Samuel 23:4,

Once again David inquired of the Lord, and the Lord answered him, “Go down to Keilah, for I am going to give the Philistines into your hand.”

1 Samuel 30:8,

and David inquired of the Lord, “Shall I pursue this raiding party? Will I overtake them?”
“Pursue them,” he answered. “You will certainly overtake them and succeed in the rescue.”

2 Samuel 2:1

In the course of time, David inquired of the Lord. “Shall I go up to one of the towns of Judah?” he asked.
The Lord said, “Go up.”
David asked, “Where shall I go?”
“To Hebron,” the Lord answered.

2 Samuel 5:19,

so David inquired of the Lord, “Shall I go and attack the Philistines? Will you deliver them into my hands?”
The Lord answered him, “Go, for I will surely deliver the Philistines into your hands.”

2 Samuel 5:23,

so David inquired of the Lord, and he answered, “Do not go straight up, but circle around behind them and attack them in front of the poplar trees.

I’m detecting a pattern in David’s life. David brought every decision to the Lord, but more important, David waited for the Lord to answer before acting.

C. David Had an Obedient Heart

David loved God’s laws. David is credited with writing over half of the 150 Psalms in the Bible, often praising the perfect Word of God. Like Psalm 119:47-48,

“For I delight in your commands because I love them. I lift up my hands to your commands, which I love, and I meditate on your decrees.”

Because David continually looked to God’s word, the Lord granted David wisdom and understanding. Like Tony continually reminds us, every night and every morning read God’s word and put on the whole armor of God. Obedience to the Lord provides the lamp that lights our path, shows us where to walk and how far to walk and how fast to walk. Psalm 119:2-3,

“Blessed are they who keep his statutes and seek him with all their heart. They do nothing wrong; they walk in his ways.”

And when God said “no,” David humbly and graciously accepted God’s word. When God told David through Nathan that Solomon was to build the temple instead of David, here is how David responded in 2 Samuel 7:18-22.

Then King David went in and sat before the Lord, and he said:
“Who am I, Sovereign Lord, and what is my family, that you have brought me this far? And as if this were not enough in your sight, Sovereign Lord, you have also spoken about the future of the house of your servant—and this decree, Sovereign Lord, is for a mere human!
“What more can David say to you? For you know your servant, Sovereign Lord. For the sake of your word and according to your will, you have done this great thing and made it known to your servant.
“How great you are, Sovereign Lord! There is no one like you, and there is no God but you, as we have heard with our own ears.

D. David Had a Trusting Heart

David’s heart was trusting, and David’s heart was bold. When David came face to face with Goliath, David wasn’t afraid of Goliath’s reputation, size, ferocity, no. David instead focused on the power and promise of God. Standing before Goliath, David said in 1 Samuel 17:45-47,

David said to the Philistine, “You come against me with sword and spear and javelin, but I come against you in the name of the Lord Almighty, the God of the armies of Israel, whom you have defied. This day the Lord will deliver you into my hands, and I’ll strike you down and cut off your head. This very day I will give the carcasses of the Philistine army to the birds and the wild animals, and the whole world will know that there is a God in Israel. All those gathered here will know that it is not by sword or spear that the Lord saves; for the battle is the Lord’s, and he will give all of you into our hands.”

David knew the Lord’s will because he sought God’s will, and then when the challenges came, David was able to trust in the Lord and stand fearless.

E. David Had a Thankful Heat

David was thankful to the Lord through both good times and bad. Psalm 26:6-7,

I wash my hands in innocence,
and go about your altar, Lord,
proclaiming aloud your praise
and telling of all your wonderful deeds.
David’s life was marked by periods of victory and prosperity, but also loneliness and despair. But David, never ever forgot to thank the Lord through it all. Psalm 100,
Shout for joy to the Lord, all the earth.
Worship the Lord with gladness;
come before him with joyful songs.
Know that the Lord is God.
It is he who made us, and we are his;
we are his people, the sheep of his pasture.
Enter his gates with thanksgiving
and his courts with praise;
give thanks to him and praise his name.
For the Lord is good and his love endures forever;
his faithfulness continues through all generations.

F. David Had a Repentant Heart

Despite David’s heart for God, he was still human and still sinned. Faced with temptation when he spied Bathsheba from his roof, David didn’t turn from sin or flee from temptation. David instead called to her and committed adultery. When Bathsheba became pregnant, David arranged to have her husband murdered. It says in the final verse of 2 Samuel 11:27,

‘The thing David had done displeased the LORD”.

The prophet Nathan confronted David, and David didn’t make excuses, didn’t try to justify what he had done. David humbled himself and said (2 Samuel 12:13),

“I have sinned against the LORD”

Perhaps his repentance led him to write in Psalm 51:10-12,

Create in me a pure heart, O God,
and renew a steadfast spirit within me.
Do not cast me from your presence
or take your Holy Spirit from me.
Restore to me the joy of your salvation
and grant me a willing spirit, to sustain me.

David still suffered the consequences of his sin, and the sword never left his house, but David’s heart was bowed to the Lord in humility, praise, worship, and devotion.

VI. Conclusion

When we wonder why David was considered a man after God’s own heart, we’re looking at David’s failures. To understand why David was considered a man after God’s own heart, we should look instead to David’s responses to his failures.

Because David sinned. You sinned. I sinned. And I thank the Lord that my sins do not disqualify me from an eternal life with my savior. Rather than look at David’s failures, we can try to be like David in the best ways, by being a people after God’s own heart. We don’t have to be perfect. David was a fugitive, a rotten father, an adulterer, a murderer. Yet he was also a man after God’s own heart.

Likewise, if we focus on our own sins, we miss out on being “a man after God’s own heart.” It’s not our failures that God sees, but our heart and what we do when we discover we are in sin.

God still seeks those whose hearts belong to Him. 2 Chronicles 16:9 says,

For the eyes of the Lord range throughout the earth to strengthen those whose hearts are fully committed to him.

Slide31We can take the best David had to offer and apply it to our own lives. We can have a faithful heart, a seeking heart, an obedient heart, a trusting heart, a thankful heart, a repentant heart.

We can be someone after God’s own heart.

To God be the glory. Amen.

Averted

I. Introduction

We’re continuing our study of the life of David in 2 Samuel, and today we’re in 2 Samuel 20. This lesson was challenging to me at first. I reached out to Chris and a pastor here at Second for help, but what God would say to us wasn’t entirely clear to me.

II. Disgruntled Joab

So first let’s look at our scripture today and gain an understanding of what’s happening. Our cast for today’s episode consists primarily of Sheba, Amasa, Joab and David. We’ve met David and Joab in our previous studies, but two of these names are new.

Slide2

Joab was a remarkable nephew of David, a son of David’s sister Zeruiah. Zeruiah had 3 sons who each have a role in today’s scripture. The oldest is Abishai, then comes Joab, and the youngest was Asahel.

Slide3

We first met Joab when Ishbosheth, “Man of Shame,” had assumed the throne, propped up by Abner, even though both of them knew that David had been selected by God to be the king of Israel. At a showdown between David’s army and Ishbosheth’s army, Abner tried to flee, but Joab’s youngest brother Asahel chased him down. At the last second, Abner turned and thrust his spear into Asahel, instantly killing him. Joab has just lost his youngest brother.

In a short while, a truce is called, and Abner agrees as part of this truce to serve David. When Abner walks into the city gates to assume his role under David, however, Joab assassinates him, revenge for killing his younger brother.

Sure, Joab was in charge of David’s army, and helped David win many battles, but David was afraid of him. Far too often, Joab served the king in his Joab’s way, took matters into his own hands, and was ruthless about his revenge. In 2 Samuel 3:39, David says,

“I am the chosen king, but Joab and Abishai have more power than I do. So God will have to pay them back for the evil thing they did.”

Slide4

A few weeks ago, we studied about the insurrection of Absalom. He’s the arrogant but pretty son of David with a great head of hair. Joab was still David’s commander at this time. David had asked Joab to put down the revolution of Absalom, but be gentle with Absalom himself. After all, Absalom was still David’s son. Joab wasn’t gentle, though; when Absalom got his hair caught in the branches, Joab went to see him and threw three spears into body of Absalom to kill him.

Slide5

David was unhappy with Joab’s actions, and when he went to talk to Joab about it, Joab rebuked David for mourning over his son. After all, his son had tried to overthrow David. Chris did a masterful job last week talking about David’s flaws and Chris’s failure to get straight A’s in French, and how David’s army absolutely slaughtered Absalom’s army. It’s like Joab was saying, “David! Man-up and stop grieving. You won the battle! Yeah, I killed your son, get over it already.”

Eventually, David had to remove Joab from his position as the commander of Israel’s army. He had to – Joab would win battles, sure, but he outright assassinated Abner and then killed David’s son who was hanging helpless from a tree. David chose another nephew, Amasa, son of a different sister of David’s, to lead his army. Amasa and Joab were cousins to each other.

Slide6

This didn’t sit well with Joab. Besides being rivals and cousins, Amasa had led Absalom’s army when Absalom had tried to overthrow David. Joab considered Amasa a traitor, while David considered Amasa as far easier to work with than Joab had been.

III. The Failed Revolution of Sheba

Anyway, David had successfully put down the insurrection of Absalom with Joab’s help, but lost his son Absalom when Joab killed him. Joab gets pushed out of his role as commander of the Israeli army, now headed by Joab’s cousin Amasa, who Joab hates. Y’all got all that, who hates who?

And David’s troubles aren’t over. Absalom had almost succeeded in his revolt, but a man named Sheba, a distant relative of Saul, sees an opportunity. Which brings us to our scripture today in 2 Samuel 20:1-2,

Now a troublemaker named Sheba son of Bikri, a Benjamite, happened to be there. He sounded the trumpet and shouted,
“We have no share in David,
no part in Jesse’s son!
Every man to his tent, Israel!”

Slide7

So all the men of Israel deserted David to follow Sheba son of Bikri. But the men of Judah stayed by their king all the way from the Jordan to Jerusalem.

If it isn’t one revolution, it’s another. Sheba manages to incite a great many people to follow him, though David still successfully rules Judah and Jerusalem. David then calls to his commander – no, not Joab, that other commander, Amasa, and told him to gather the troops in verse 4,

Then the king said to Amasa, “Summon the men of Judah to come to me within three days, and be here yourself.”

Slide8

Amasa might have been in charge, but that doesn’t mean he was any good at his job. Verse 5 says,

But when Amasa went to summon Judah, he took longer than the time the king had set for him.

I image David sitting at the window, checking his watch, and saying, “Where *is* that Amasa? He should have been here by now. We have an insurrection to go to that starts at 7.”

After 3 days, David tells Joab’s older brother – not Joab, but the Joab’s remaining brother Abishai– to take whatever troops are left and go after Sheba. No telling where Amasa is with the main regiment of troops. Verse 6-7,

David said to Abishai, “Now Sheba son of Bikri will do us more harm than Absalom did. Take your master’s men and pursue him, or he will find fortified cities and escape from us.” So Joab’s men and the Kerethites and Pelethites and all the mighty warriors went out under the command of Abishai. They marched out from Jerusalem to pursue Sheba son of Bikri.

Slide10

So along the way, Abishai and Joab head after Sheba, when they run into Amasa. Amasa had apparently found some rocks to stand around, I don’t really know what he was doing there, and Joab sees his opportunity to do evil:

While they were at the great rock in Gibeon, Amasa came to meet them. Joab was wearing his military tunic, and strapped over it at his waist was a belt with a dagger in its sheath. As he stepped forward, it dropped out of its sheath.
Joab said to Amasa, “How are you, my brother?” Then Joab took Amasa by the beard with his right hand to kiss him. Amasa was not on his guard against the dagger in Joab’s hand, and Joab plunged it into his belly, and his intestines spilled out on the ground. Without being stabbed again, Amasa died.

Slide13

Joab and Abishai started out on their original mission, which was to pursue Amasa, but there’s a problem: there’s a dead body in the middle of the road:

Then Joab and his brother Abishai pursued Sheba son of Bikri.
One of Joab’s men stood beside Amasa and said, “Whoever favors Joab, and whoever is for David, let him follow Joab!” Amasa lay wallowing in his blood in the middle of the road, and the man saw that all the troops came to a halt there. When he realized that everyone who came up to Amasa stopped, he dragged him from the road into a field and threw a garment over him. After Amasa had been removed from the road, everyone went on with Joab to pursue Sheba son of Bikri.

Does this seem callous to any of you? It does to me. But wait, the callousness is not yet over. Joab and Abishai arrive at a little town called Abel Beth Maaka. There’s a city wall, protecting the city, and Joab builds a ramp and starts battering the wall down. A woman inside the walls comes out and says, “Who’s making all the racket? You kids better stop with all that noise! You kids get off my lawn!” Here’s the verses, 2 Samuel 20:14-19,

Slide16

Sheba passed through all the tribes of Israel to Abel Beth Maakah and through the entire region of the Bikrites, who gathered together and followed him. All the troops with Joab came and besieged Sheba in Abel Beth Maakah. They built a siege ramp up to the city, and it stood against the outer fortifications. While they were battering the wall to bring it down, a wise woman called from the city, “Listen! Listen! Tell Joab to come here so I can speak to him.” He went toward her, and she asked, “Are you Joab?”
“I am,” he answered.
She said, “Listen to what your servant has to say.”
“I’m listening,” he said.
She continued, “Long ago they used to say, ‘Get your answer at Abel,’ and that settled it. We are the peaceful and faithful in Israel. You are trying to destroy a city that is a mother in Israel. Why do you want to swallow up the Lord’s inheritance?”

Joab responds, “Who, me?” I just want to kill Sheba.

The wise woman answers, “Oh, is that all you want? Well, we can cut off his head and toss it over the wall for you, if you’d like.”

Joab replies, “That’ll be fine, have a nice day.” You might think I’m making this exchange up, but that’s the way I read it.

“Far be it from me!” Joab replied, “Far be it from me to swallow up or destroy! That is not the case. A man named Sheba son of Bikri, from the hill country of Ephraim, has lifted up his hand against the king, against David. Hand over this one man, and I’ll withdraw from the city.”
The woman said to Joab, “His head will be thrown to you from the wall.”
Then the woman went to all the people with her wise advice, and they cut off the head of Sheba son of Bikri and threw it to Joab. So he sounded the trumpet, and his men dispersed from the city, each returning to his home. And Joab went back to the king in Jerusalem.

So what’s the moral of the story?

I confess, I read this section several times, studied, prayed… I asked advice from a pastor here who told me not to lose my head about it. Really.

There are no good guys in this story, no moral high ground. To me just a bunch of people doing their own thing, not trusting in the Lord, reaping the repercussions of their decision. One of my favorite sayings is, “If you can’t be a good example, then do your best to be a horrible warning.” Maybe that’s what’s going on.

IV. The Sword Will Never Leave David’s House

Or on the other hand, step back and look at the big picture. We have to go all the way back 2 Samuel 12. Chris did an excellent lesson on confession and transgressions and Psalm 32 and a study of David’s infidelity with Bathsheba, as well as forgiveness and the promise of eternal salvation if we are faithful and confess our sins. And Theresa taught us about grief and one of the phrases in her handout struck me, it said,

When we do not obey God, grief with guilt and consequences will be the canvas where the episodes of our life will be played out.

Even though David is not a big part of today’s scripture, we are seeing that in force in today’s scripture. When David had Uriah the Hittite murdered, Nathan’s prophecy to David was in 2 Samuel 12:9-10, the Lord said,

Why did you despise the word of the Lord by doing what is evil in his eyes? You struck down Uriah the Hittite with the sword and took his wife to be your own. You killed him with the sword of the Ammonites.  Now, therefore, the sword will never depart from your house, because you despised me and took the wife of Uriah the Hittite to be your own.’

The sword will never depart from your house. David was guilty of a great many things, and when Nathan confronted David about it, David confessed that he had sinned. I think that’s one of the many reasons David was a man after God’s own heart – David’s first response wasn’t, “but he deserved it” or “I deserve this,” but “I have sinned.”

And the Lord is quick to forgive, but forgiveness doesn’t erase the repercussions. Christians cannot rob a bank and expect they will avoid jail time. Christians cannot drink to excess and expect that they will avoid cirrhosis of the liver. All sins have consequences, even seemingly minor ones such as gossip. Has anybody here ever gossiped? And that’s not everyone, at least that’s not what I heard.

I was thinking about these after meeting a couple on the beach recently. My wife, being a people person, does an excellent job of starting a conversation and turning it to theological questions. We were just walking by and I don’t remember why we stopped to talk. The couple apparently had been having a discussion about religion. She was Catholic and telling the man that he had to go to church to go to heaven, and going to church with her was probably necessary if they were going to continue dating. He was working on probably his 3rd or 4th beer of the morning, saying that Jesus loved everybody and so he was going to heaven even if he didn’t go to church. True story.
And then somehow we got involved. I just wanted to pick up seashells and dip my toes in the sand.

I don’t remember the nuances of the conversation. I’m pretty sure I took the position that there was some truth in what each of them were saying. For her benefit, I told her that only by placing her faith in Jesus as her Messiah would she be saved, that church attendance had nothing to do with salvation. Nor were there any works necessary to minimize purgatory, that Jesus told the thief on the cross that today he would be with Jesus in heaven, not stop in Purgatory on the way.

For his benefit, I told him how Jesus said many would say to him, “Lord, Lord,” and Jesus would reply, “Away from me, I never knew you.” And this is where the discussion got odd. He told me of course he knew Jesus, so Jesus must know him.

So I explained that Jesus meant something deeper than a passing acquaintance, that you had to place your trust in him. And he replied that’s exactly what he was doing, he just didn’t need to go to church or read the bible to make that happen.

So then I explained from Paul’s letter to the Corinthians that our earthly works that did not further God’s kingdom would be burned, but the man would himself would be saved, he’d have that singed smell like a leftover campfire, and that our works that furthered the kingdom of God would be turned into crowns that we would then throw at the feet of Jesus.

He asked, well, what if he didn’t get a crown? I replied, well I suppose you’d at the back of the crowd, empty handed, wishing you had a crown to worship Jesus with.
He said, “I’d still be saved, though, right? I just wouldn’t have a crown?” And I said, “Yeah, probably, something like that.” He took another sip of beer and said, “I’m ok with that.”

I wasn’t sure what to do with that. My unexpressed opinion was that one could not possibly love Jesus without a desire to get to know Him better, but I realized how much of my life had been spent in just that state, trusting in Jesus, too lazy to get to know Him better.

One thing we did not discuss, though, ties into our scripture, how the sword will never leave the house of David. Or what I consider a related scripture, Exodus 34:7 (and multiple other places in scripture),

Keeping steadfast love for thousands, forgiving iniquity and transgression and sin, but who will by no means clear the guilty, visiting the iniquity of the fathers on the children and the children’s children, to the third and the fourth generation.”

Sins just don’t affect us. They affect those around us, they affect our children, they affect our children’s children. I was asked recently why God punishes our children for things we do, but that’s not really a good question. God doesn’t punish our children, and God makes this clear in scripture like Ezekiel 18:20,

“The soul who sins shall die. The son shall not suffer for the iniquity of the father, nor the father suffer for the iniquity of the son. The righteousness of the righteous shall be upon himself, and the wickedness of the wicked shall be upon himself.”

We are all responsible for our own sins, whose wages are death. But that doesn’t mean that others aren’t affected. It’s especially visible when a pastor sins – after all, pastors are people, and all have sinned. I used to read bible studies and listen to podcasts from the Mars Hill church in Seattle, Washington. The church had grown to over 12,000 people attending weekly and was considered a role model for evangelism and emerging churches.

But then the pastor published a book, and then used church money to buy all the copies of the book so the book would skyrocket to the top of the New York Times bestseller list. Pastors and congregation objected, considered it unethical, and the resulting notoriety had people looking into the actual book itself which turned out to have large sections plagiarized from other pastors. When confronted, the Mars Hill pastor went on the offensive and bullied his staff that disagreed with him. Within a year, the church – a megachurch – had disbanded and is no more. One man’s sin of pride had repercussions that affected thousands.

But God’s not punishing the congregation, no. But they are impacted by another’s sin.
Same thing in the house of David. David’s heart may have been for God, but he had plenty of actions that brought calamity upon his house. Sons that rebelled, sons that tried to overthrow him. David’s inconsistent role model set a poor example that brought collateral damage on his household, and the sword never left the house of David.
Joab probably looked at the life of David and saw an adulterer and a murderer who got away with his crimes. As a result, Joab probably saw nothing wrong with murdering David’s son Absalom, and then murdering his cousin Amasa, all to regain his position as commander of the Israeli army. And why not? David had Uriah murdered, didn’t he?

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V. Conclusion

I read no scripture when studying for this lesson that Joab had a strong faith in God, or any faith at all for that matter. He was a power hungry egomaniac with murderous intentions. He was certainly impacted by the sins of David, but David, despite his many flaws, loved the Lord. As a result of his love for the Lord, his eternal destination was secure. It was his temporal, earthy life that was so tumultuous. The sword never left his house, and family and friends alike were killed.

Our sins have repercussions. We are forgiven, for sure. When we enter the kingdom of heaven, God promises to separate us from our sins as far as the east is from the west. They are buried in the sea and forgotten.

But friends and family, children and grandchildren, are certainly left to deal what we leave behind, just as we are dealing with the sins of our parents and grandparents. None of us are perfect.

A quick look now at Romans 6:23,

For the wages of sin is death, but the gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord.

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Have you ever noticed that we earn death, but eternal life is a gift? Our father in heaven loves us despite our many flaws and sins and freed us from the penalty of sin.

Praise be to our Father in heaven for the gift of life we do not deserve, and freedom from the death we do deserve.

To God be the glory. Amen.

Deposed

I. Introduction

We’re studying the life of David as told through the book of 2 Samuel, and when we get to today’s chapter 15, things are a mess in the kingdom.

Of course, God knows everything, and he told the people of Israel the kingdom would be a mess. Way back in 1 Samuel 8, when the prophet Samuel was still alive, the people asked for a king. The motivation of the people? 1 Samuel 5b,

“now appoint a king to lead us, such as all the other nations have.”

All the other cool nations have a king, we want one, too. Samuel tried to talk them out of it with sound doctrine: Samuel said you already have a king, the Lord God. But the people continued to protest. Samuel warned the people the king would draft their husbands into the army and take a tenth of everything they owned. And also warned the people in 1 Samuel 8:18,

“When that day comes, you will cry out for relief from the king you have chosen, but the Lord will not answer you in that day.”

Slide3Well, that day has come, and kingdom is a mess, and the people finally have their prayers answered, like it or not.

II. The Sword Will Never Depart

While King David may have been a brilliant warrior and a man after God’s own heart, David’s family life was a mess. David had many wives and concubines and at least 19 sons and 1 daughter that I could find in the scriptures. This set up a power struggle within David’s family since only 1 son could inherit the throne when David passed on.

Early on as a king, David commits adultery with Bathsheba, and worse, then tries to cover it up by having her husband Uriah murdered. When the prophet Nathan confronts David, David repents of his sin. And like each one of us, when we repent of our sins to the Lord, the Lord is just and merciful and forgives us of those sins. However, the Lord also tells us that in this life, we are responsible for the sins we commit, and we bear the consequences of those sins. Somebody that robs a bank, for instance, may come to Christ while in prison. But that doesn’t mean his jailers are going to open the doors and set him free. His freedom from his sin comes in the next life, and he may freely lay that burden down at the feet of Jesus. Here are the verses on forgiveness and consequences addressed to David in 2 Samuel 12:10-14. The Lord said to David through the prophet Nathan –

Slide5

Now, therefore, the sword will never depart from your house, because you despised me and took the wife of Uriah the Hittite to be your own.’

“This is what the Lord says: ‘Out of your own household I am going to bring calamity on you. Before your very eyes I will take your wives and give them to one who is close to you, and he will sleep with your wives in broad daylight. You did it in secret, but I will do this thing in broad daylight before all Israel.’”

Then David said to Nathan, “I have sinned against the Lord.”

Nathan replied, “The Lord has taken away your sin. You are not going to die. But because by doing this you have shown utter contempt for the Lord, the son born to you will die.”

Slide6.JPGOur scripture today centers on the 3rd son of David, named Absalom. Ironically, Absalom’s name comes from the Hebrew meaning “father of peace,” and Absalom most definitely didn’t live up to his name. Absalom instead was central to the prophecy that the sword would never depart from the house of David.

The trouble started a few chapters back, when another son Amnon violated his half-sister Tamar as Theresa taught us last week on a wonderful lesson about grieving and the consequences of sin. Absalom, furious about this violation to his sister, waited two years and then setup an ambush to kill Amnon, then Absalom flees to Geshur and goes into hiding for three years.

David is, of course furious at Absalom, but eventually David’s heart begins to thaw. Absalom may have killed David’s son Amnon, but Absalom, too, is David’s son. David has Absalom brought back to Jerusalem, but it still takes another two years before David is willing to look at Absalom face to face.

III. Absalom the Demagogue

But Absalom aspired to ascend to the throne. He’s the oldest surviving son and heir to the throne, but Absalom is impatient and full of pride. One bible study commentary called Absalom a “demagogue.” Now, I confess my vocabulary limitations here. I don’t know how many stories or newspaper articles that called somebody a demagogue, and I guess I’ve always been too lazy to look up the definition. Well, no more. According to Random House Unabridged Dictionary,

Demagogue, noun, [dem-uh-gog, -gawg]
a person, especially an orator or political leader, who gains power and popularity by arousing the emotions, passions, and prejudices of the people.

Slide7Or as another put it,

One who preaches doctrines he knows to be untrue to men he knows to be idiots.Slide8

David might have been a mighty warrior, but Absalom was pretty. He’s described in 2 Samuel 14:25-26,

In all Israel there was not a man so highly praised for his handsome appearance as Absalom. From the top of his head to the sole of his foot there was no blemish in him. Whenever he cut the hair of his head—he used to cut his hair once a year because it became too heavy for him—he would weigh it, and its weight was two hundred shekels by the royal standard.

Two hundred sheckels is about 5 pounds of hair. I tried to find a picture of what 5 pounds of hair looks like for an illustration, and the closest I could find was this –

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Source.

This is only 3.5 pounds of hair, so Absalom had even more. And Absalom spent his days campaigning for the hearts of the people. Look at 2 Samuel 15:1-6,

In the course of time, Absalom provided himself with a chariot and horses and with fifty men to run ahead of him. He would get up early and stand by the side of the road leading to the city gate. Whenever anyone came with a complaint to be placed before the king for a decision, Absalom would call out to him, “What town are you from?” He would answer, “Your servant is from one of the tribes of Israel.” Then Absalom would say to him, “Look, your claims are valid and proper, but there is no representative of the king to hear you.” And Absalom would add, “If only I were appointed judge in the land! Then everyone who has a complaint or case could come to me and I would see that they receive justice.”

Also, whenever anyone approached him to bow down before him, Absalom would reach out his hand, take hold of him and kiss him. Absalom behaved in this way toward all the Israelites who came to the king asking for justice, and so he stole the hearts of the people of Israel.

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So Absalom would greet the people and tell them that of course they are right, and whatever dispute they have should be settled in their favor. It’s flattery and pandering, but people are so swayed when they hear the words they want to hear. Reminds of me 2 Timothy 4:3,

For the time will come when people will not put up with sound doctrine. Instead, to suit their own desires, they will gather around them a great number of teachers to say what their itching ears want to hear.

And when anybody bowed down to Absalom as though he were a king, he’d take their hand and kiss them. And the people loved him for it.

IV. Absalom the King

Absalom did this for four years, about as long as the typical presidential election cycle, winning the hearts and minds of the people and undermining David’s rule by implying David wasn’t doing a good job. And after four years, Absalom made his move to overthrow David. 2 Samuel 15:7-10,

At the end of four years, Absalom said to the king, “Let me go to Hebron and fulfill a vow I made to the Lord. While your servant was living at Geshur in Aram, I made this vow: ‘If the Lord takes me back to Jerusalem, I will worship the Lord in Hebron.’”
The king said to him, “Go in peace.” So he went to Hebron.
Then Absalom sent secret messengers throughout the tribes of Israel to say, “As soon as you hear the sound of the trumpets, then say, ‘Absalom is king in Hebron.’”

Slide13And so the coup, the overthrown of King David by his own son Absalom begins. I note here that Absalom is using a religious pretext to begin the revolution. As far as David knew, this was going to be a religious feast in Hebron, but Absalom used religion as a cover for his sins.

As soon as Absalom was ready, the trumpets sound and the messengers quickly spread the word: “Absalom is king and reigns in Hebron!” The war has begun. Knowing that the first move in overthrowing the kingdom is to kill the old king, David moves quickly in verse 14,

Then David said to all his officials who were with him in Jerusalem, “Come! We must flee, or none of us will escape from Absalom. We must leave immediately, or he will move quickly to overtake us and bring ruin on us and put the city to the sword.”

Slide14David brings his personal bodyguards, and abdicates the throne. David is protecting the inhabitants because he knows that Absalom will kill everybody in resistance. Who will fight for David? The hearts of Israel were with that pretty demagogue from Hebron, Absalom.

But David has a miraculous army provided to him. David has visitors from out of town, 600 Gittites led by Ittai. David tells Ittai, sorry about the mess but you know how children are, why, just look at this place, and I’m sorry it’s time for you to go in 2 Samuel 15:19-21,

The king said to Ittai the Gittite, “Why should you come along with us? Go back and stay with King Absalom. You are a foreigner, an exile from your homeland. You came only yesterday. And today shall I make you wander about with us, when I do not know where I am going? Go back, and take your people with you. May the Lord show you kindness and faithfulness.”
But Ittai replied to the king, “As surely as the Lord lives, and as my lord the king lives, wherever my lord the king may be, whether it means life or death, there will your servant be.”

Slide15I find this interesting, David is the true king of Israel, but rejected by his people. The Gittites are gentiles, people outside Israel, that rally to the king with devotion. Like Jesus, rejected by His own as the true king of Israel. And like the Gittites, we are the gentiles that form the church that follow Him. Ittai of the Gittites expresses a commitment that should be a model for all Christians. “As surely as the Lord lives, and as my lord the king lives, wherever my lord the king may be, whether it means life or death, there will your servant be.”

David goes to the Mount of Olives and weeps for Absalom, his son. All those years of his son being in exile, and the beginnings of a reconciliation, but not once did Absalom ever ask for forgiveness of his sins for killing his brother Amnon. Instead, using religion as an excuse, Absalom plotted the overthrown of his father and now occupies Jerusalem. By fleeing the city, David has spared Jerusalem a bloodbath, but now David is in danger. What is the future of the kingdom of Israel and God’ covenant with David?

V. The Fall of Absalom

But despite David’s failings, the Lord was with him. Absalom was full of pride and ambition, and we all know that prides goes before the fall. Absalom assembles an army to destroy David, but David has his army of gentiles led by his captain, Joab. David still loves his son, despite his son’s evil ambitions, and tells his captain Joab in 2 Samuel 18:5,

The king commanded Joab, Abishai and Ittai, “Be gentle with the young man Absalom for my sake.”

Slide16The pain that David must have been going through, overthrown by his murderous son, yet… it’s still his son.

Scripture says David’s army marched out to the forest of Ephraim to meet Absalom’s army. It was a rout. David’s men slaughtered 20,000 of Absalom’s men, and Absalom, well, scripture tells this best, 2 Samuel 18:9-11,14.

Now Absalom happened to meet David’s men. He was riding his mule, and as the mule went under the thick branches of a large oak, Absalom’s hair got caught in the tree. He was left hanging in midair, while the mule he was riding kept on going.
When one of the men saw what had happened, he told Joab, “I just saw Absalom hanging in an oak tree.”
Joab said to the man who had told him this, “What! You saw him? Why didn’t you strike him to the ground right there? Then I would have had to give you ten shekels of silver and a warrior’s belt.”
Joab said, “I’m not going to wait like this for you.” So he took three javelins in his hand and plunged them into Absalom’s heart while Absalom was still alive in the oak tree.

Slide17Absalom’s pride did him in, hung by his own hair. The battle was over, and when David hears that Absalom is dead, 2 Samuel 18:33,

The king was shaken. He went up to the room over the gateway and wept. As he went, he said: “O my son Absalom! My son, my son Absalom! If only I had died instead of you—O Absalom, my son, my son!”

VI. A Father’s Love

Was David’s affection misplaced? Absalom was wicked, unrepentant, prideful, a manipulator, a demagogue, and a control freak. And that was on his good days. In many ways, this is the exact opposite of the parable of the prodigal son. The son demanded his inheritance and then spent it all, and with his tail between his legs, took himself back home, hoping to be a servant in his father’s house. To his surprise, his father rand out to greet him with open arms and held a banquet for his son.

Absalom never put his tail between his legs to come home. All accounts seem to indicate he was unrepentant to the end and died by his own pride.

And if we’re honest with ourselves, that’s our destiny without our savior. We are wicked, unrepentant, prideful, a manipulator, a demagogue and a control freak, destined to be undone by our own pride. Romans 3:23 says,

for all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God

And yet, for all our sinful pride, our Father in heaven loves us. Romans 5:8 says,

But God demonstrates his own love for us in this: While we were still sinners, Christ died for us.

Slide21Understanding who we are in Christ also means understanding who we are without Christ. Without Christ, we are like Mephiboseth, lame in both feet and living in poverty and shame. Without Christ, we are enemies of God. Without Christ, we choose a destination of destruction.

VII. Conclusion

David, despite his many flaws, loved his son no matter the cost.

The very thing that David was willing to do – but could not do – was to save his son Absalom. Absalom chose his own way, a way of destruction not only to him but to thousands around him. But what David could not do, God has done for us through His son.

Even if David has his prayers answered, to die for Absalom, it would not have benefited Absalom. But God can do what we cannot, and God sent His only son to pay for our pride, our vanity, our demagoguery.

Psalm 103:13 –

As a father has compassion on his children,
so the Lord has compassion on those who fear him;
Our father in heaven loves us with a love beyond our understanding.

Slide23To God be the glory. Amen.

Valued

I.    Introduction

We are continuing our study of 2 Samuel, and we’re up to chapter 9. Let’s recap some history to remember where we are. God, through the prophet Samuel, had selected David to be the future king of Israel. The previous king Saul was a mixed bag of nuts, sometimes trying to love David, most of the time trying to kill him, so David spent much of his early years hiding in the desert.

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David’s best friend was Jonathan, the son of King Saul. King Saul perished in a fight at Mount Gilboa against the Philistines, and King Saul’s son Jonathan also perished in that battle. David soon became king over Israel after a few skirmishes with Abner and Ishbosheth.

II.    Jonathan

You probably have a friend. I would hope so. Some of you with active Facebook accounts might have over 2000 friends. But you probably only have 1, maybe 2 or 3 people you consider to be close friends. A friend that’s been there through the best times, but also the worst. A friend you’ve had an awful fight with and yet stayed friends.

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Some people can make new friends at the drop of a hat. Me, I don’t know how to do that. At work, when I’m assigned to a new project, it’s almost like going to work for a new company. Most of the people on the team have never met each other.

It takes me about 6 months to feel like I’m integrated, part of the team, and able to relax my guard, show a little humor, make some work friends. You may have noticed it here in this class, when you first started attending and met me for the first time, thinking I’m way too stiff and formal. Give it 6 months. Then instead of stiff and formal, you’ll realize I’m goofy.

My 2 closest friends I’ve had for a long time. I met Sean in high school, went to Texas A&M with him and after some separation due to travel, we both ended up back in the Houston area. We’ve had a couple of issues that drove a wedge between us temporarily, but only temporarily. As soon as he realizes I was right all along, we get along.

And Dean I met at my first real job while I was still in college. We’ve both grown in faith over the years. Funny how we went from bar-hopping together to doing bible studies together.

The point is, I’ve known Sean for 42 years, and Dean for 36 years. I will never ever have a chance to make a friend and keep them for 40 years, so I’m keeping the ones I have.

David and Jonathan were best of friends from the time David, as a young boy, slew Goliath. Jonathan realized that David’s faith and courage were the same characteristics Jonathan admired, and both trusted in the Lord. And Jonathan was the son of King Saul, heir to the thrown by birthright! And yet Jonathan recognized God’s favor on David as the future king. Many times, Jonathan interceded to save David from Saul’s anger. How easy it would have been for Jonathan to step aside, let Saul kill David, and then inherit the throne! But Jonathan knew the will of the Lord was for David to be king, and spent his life seeking the Lord’s will.

No doubt, when Jonathan perished with his father Saul at the hands of the Philistines, David grieved for his best friend.

III.    David’s Compassion for Jonathan

Years go by, Jonathan thinking about his old friend, when he begins to wonder if there’s anybody left on that side of the family. He knows Saul and all Saul’s sons have perished, but maybe there’s still some family member still alive. He ponders in 2 Samuel 9:1,

David asked, “Is there anyone still left of the house of Saul to whom I can show kindness for Jonathan’s sake?”

Slide6Turns out that Jonathan had a son named Mephibosheth. Why don’t we give our children classical names like Mephibosheth anymore?

This wasn’t his original name, though. 1 Chronicles 8:34 says the son of Jonathan’s name was “Merib-Ba’al.” Remember our lesson about Saul’s youngest son Ishbosheth and how his original name was Esh-ba’al? The name “ba’al” had at one time been a generic term for “god” but eventually the formal name Ba’al was used for the pagan god Ba’al who the Philistines renamed Beelzebub. Esh-ba’al meant “man of the Lord,” but Israel no longer wanted to utter the name of Ba’al, they changed Es-ba’al to Ish-bosheth which translated as “man of shame.” Hardly an improvement, I know.

Same sort of thing is going on with Merib-ba’al which originally mean “fights for the Lord.” Since they no longer wanted to utter the name of a pagan god, they changed his name to “Mephibosheth” which means “Son of Shame.” Still not an improvement, in my opinion.

Slide8

Anyway, Mephibosheth started life off under a great deal of hardship. Back when King Saul and Jonathan died, well, let’s look at 2 Samuel 4:4,

Jonathan son of Saul had a son who was lame in both feet. He was five years old when the news about Saul and Jonathan came from Jezreel. His nurse picked him up and fled, but as she hurried to leave, he fell and became disabled. His name was Mephibosheth.

Slide9A tough life indeed. Once part of a royal family, son of Prince Jonathan, heir to the King of Israel, now Mephibosheth is disabled, living in poverty. Probably still living in hiding, in fear that King David might try to wipe out what’s left of Saul’s family to protect the throne.

IV.    David Seeks Mephibosheth

But David, as we’ve heard, was a man after God’s own heart. In 2 Samuel 9, David is not remembering the times Saul tried to kill him. He’s remember how the son of Saul, Jonathan, tried to save him. And he asks,

David asked, “Is there anyone still left of the house of Saul to whom I can show kindness for Jonathan’s sake?”

A former servant of Saul tells David that there is one person left, a grandson of Saul’s, son of Jonathan, named Mephibosheth, living in poverty, lame and unable to walk. David sends for him to be brought to the king.

I wonder what Mephibosheth was thinking at this point. Certainly nothing good, to be summoned before the king. Mephibosheth had spent his whole life in fear of being killed, in poverty, unable to walk, and now suddenly King David himself sends for him.

V.    Greeting the King

In 2 Samuel 9:6-8, here is how the two greet each other:

When Mephibosheth son of Jonathan, the son of Saul, came to David, he bowed down to pay him honor.

David said, “Mephibosheth!”

That’s not a sneeze, by the way, “Mephibosheth!”

“At your service,” he replied.

“Don’t be afraid,” David said to him, “for I will surely show you kindness for the sake of your father Jonathan. I will restore to you all the land that belonged to your grandfather Saul, and you will always eat at my table.”

Mephibosheth bowed down and said, “What is your servant, that you should notice a dead dog like me?”

Mephibosheth was in no position to demand anything. Compared to David, Mephibosheth considered himself the worth of a “dead dog.” And David owed Mephibosheth nothing, he was the king over all Israel.

In fact, if we understand the times of David and Mephibosheth, it was common for the new king to kill the family of the old king. Mephibosheth was in line for the throne of the old King Saul; perhaps Mephibosheth feared that King David would have him run through with a sword, just to end the dynasty of King Saul.

But David didn’t follow tradition. David didn’t follow culture. David listened to the Lord.

All the blessings Mephibosheth were received were a gift. Mephibosheth wasn’t a great warrior, wasn’t a rich man, wasn’t anything of significance. And yet, the king bestowed blessings unmerited on him. In this Old Testament history lesson, David demonstrates the compassion of Christ. And before accepting Christ, all of us are Mephibosheth, hungry, lame, and in need of a savior.

VI.    Lovingkindness

When David considered the family of Jonathan, here is the verse from 2 Samuel 9:1 again –

David asked, “Is there anyone still left of the house of Saul to whom I can show kindness for Jonathan’s sake?”

I want to spend some additional time on the word kindness to show the motivation of David. The word used for “kindness” here is the Hebrew word “checed” or some spellings are “hesed,” and it’s usually translated at “lovingkindness,” sort of an archaic term. More modern translations seem to favor the word “love” or “mercy” which is less precise.

Slide13I also learned while studying for this lesson that “checed” is related to the Hebrew word “chasidah” which is their word for the white stork. Ever wonder where we get those fables about storks bringing babies? The Hebrews noted how well the chasidah cared for it’s young, and named it after “checed,” or lovingkindness.

Slide14

The Hebrew word “checed” refers to both love combined with action and also an implication the love is part of a promise or covenant to fulfill. In other words, love in action because it’s the right thing to do. It’s used 248 times in the Old Testament, with over half of them in the book of Palms.

In the book of Genesis, you might remember Joseph being tossed in a well by his brothers, rescued by a caravan, taken to Egypt where he rises in power and responsibility in Pharaoh’s service. Eventually Joseph’s father Jacob and Joseph’s brother come to Egypt because of a famine and lived in Egypt with Joseph.

When Joseph’s father’s life is coming to an end, he wants to be buried in Israel, not Egypt. God had promised Abraham that land, and Jacob wants to be buried there. In Genesis 47:29-30, Jacob says,

When the time drew near for Israel (Jacob) to die, he called for his son Joseph and said to him, “If I have found favor in your eyes, put your hand under my thigh and promise that you will show me kindness and faithfulness. Do not bury me in Egypt, but when I rest with my fathers, carry me out of Egypt and bury me where they are buried.”

Slide15The word “kindness” here is the same word word “checed”. It’s love in action, to do something extraordinary because it’s the right thing to do.

We’re more familiar with the Greek word “agape” when it comes to love, but agape is different. Agape is self-sacrificing love for the benefit of another. Checed implies something more, fulfilling a covenant agreement and putting love in action.

It’s one of the many reasons our God is worthy of worship. He fulfills His promises. God has entered into a New Covenant with us, bound by the blood of Christ, to provide eternal forgiveness and salvation. We can trust in Him because God considers this “checed,” fulfillment of a covenant love by putting it into action. It is this “checed,” this unconditional lovingkindness to His people that distinguish our God from every other world religion and cult. Our Father fulfills His every promise.

VII.    The Gifts of the King

So David ponders in 2 Samuel 9:1,

David asked, “Is there anyone still left of the house of Saul to whom I can show kindness [checed] for Jonathan’s sake?”

David had promised his lifelong friend Jonathan they would look after each other all of their days. David felt “checed” lovingkindness and an obligation toward Jonathan and whatever remained of his family. And when he finds that Jonathan’s son is alive, David adopts Mephiboseth as his own. David fulfills his promise with lovingkindness, love in action. And what does Mephiboseth receive? 2 Samuel 9:7,

“Don’t be afraid,” David said to him, “for I will surely show you kindness for the sake of your father Jonathan. I will restore to you all the land that belonged to your grandfather Saul, and you will always eat at my table.”

David provides everything Mephiboseth could dream of. It’s as if he’s been adopted by David, to sit at David’s table. Mephiboseth did nothing to deserve this, it’s entirely a gift from David to fulfil his checed.

Our heavenly Father does the same for us. The gifts from our Father in Heaven are many, here are 11 of them –

1. The gift of a Savior, Matthew 1:21 –

“And she will have a son, and you are to name him Jesus, for he will save his people from their sins.”

2. The gift of God’s love, Jeremiah 31:3 –

“I have loved you, my people, with an everlasting love. With unfailing love I have drawn you to myself.”

3. The gift of God’s grace, Ephesians 2:8-9 –

“For by grace you have been saved through faith, and that not of yourselves; it is the gift of God, not of works, lest anyone should boast.”

4. The gift of God’s peace, John 14:27 –

“I am leaving you with a gift—peace of mind and heart. And the peace I give is a gift the world cannot give. So don’t be troubled or afraid.”

5. The gift of God’s Holy Spirit, Acts 1:8 –

“But you will receive power when the Holy Spirit comes upon you…”

6. The gift of a new life, 2 Corinthians 5:17 –

“Therefore, if anyone is in Christ, he is a new creation; old things have passed away; behold, all things have become new.”

7. The gift of freedom from bondage and sin, Romans 8:1-2 –

“So now there is no condemnation for those who belong to Christ Jesus. And because you belong to him, the power of the life-giving Spirit has freed you from the power of sin that leads to death.”

8. The gift of supernatural strength, Philippians 4:13 –

“I can do all things through Christ who gives me strength.”

9. The gift of purpose, Jeremiah 29:11 –

“For I know the plans I have for you says the Lord, plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future.”

10. The gift of prayer and direct access to God, 1 John 5:14-15 –

“And this is the confidence which we have before Him, that, if we ask anything according to His will, He hears us. And if we know that He hears us in whatever we ask, we know that we have the requests which we have asked from Him.”

11. The gift of hope, Romans 15:13 –

“I pray that God, the source of hope, will fill you completely with joy and peace because you trust in him. Then you will overflow with confident hope through the power of the Holy Spirit.”

And through the checed, the covenant love through Christ Jesus, these gifts are irrevocable. They have been given to us for eternity, Romans 8:29 –

for God’s gifts and his call are irrevocable.

And what did we do to deserve to sit at the Lord’s table? Nothing. Just accept the invitation.

VIII.    Conclusion

Like Mephiboseth, we are lame. We have nothing of our own to offer the Lord, nothing except the spiritual gifts that the Lord gave us so that we may give back. How wonderful that God has done it all for us, given us a place at His table, and had adopted us forever as His adopted children.

We spoke today about friendship – a lifelong eternal friendship with Jesus. We spoke about unmerited favor from the Lord and the good gifts He gives His children. And we spoke about checed, a lovingkindness provided by our Father in heaven that is irrevocable, lovingkindness that we can depend on because God never fails.

2 Corinthians 9:15,

“Thanks be to God for His indescribable gift.”

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To God be the glory. Amen.

Messy People

I.      Introduction

Sometimes I read the bible and the message is so easy.  Just one God, honor your Ma and Pa, don’t take things that ain’t yours, that sort of thing.  Other times, the message is obscure and difficult to plow through.  Ever sat down to read the bible and read it cover to cover?  How many of us got stuck in the begats, as in “Adam begat Seth, Seth begat Enos, and Kenan and Mahaleel and hundreds of other unpronounceable names?”

Today’s study sort of starts that way, the message in the Word seemed esoteric, and I’m not even sure what “esoteric” means.   For instance, here’s our first study verse for today in 2 Samuel 3:8 –

Then Abner was very angry over the words of Ish-bosheth and said, “Am I a dog’s head that belongs to Judah? Today I show kindness to the house of Saul your father, to his brothers and to his friends, and have not delivered you into the hands of David; and yet today you charge me with a guilt concerning the woman.

My first thought when I read this was, “what?”  But the key to understanding scripture is context, or as a pastor I heard put it, “location, location, location.”  I think we need some background before we can begin to understand this verse.

II.      Background of Messy People: David

So just in this first verse, I see at least 4 people discussed by name.  There’s Abner, Ish-bosheth, Saul, and David.  There’s also a woman mentioned, as well as brothers and friends of Saul.  I read ahead over the next several scripture verses – sometimes I do that when I’m studying – and there are several more people that will be mentioned later.  There’s another woman named Michal, a man named Paltiel the son of Laish.  And there’s at least two names that aren’t mentioned, Jonathan and Joab, that influence the events in today’s scripture. 

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Of all the names listed, David is probably the most familiar.  He’s also one of the most complicated.  David was a horrible failure and David was a wonderful success.  David committed murder in his later years and had an affair with Bathsheba.  And yet, David was described as a man after God’s own heart.  Sometimes when I read stories on David, I wonder what I’m missing. 

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But I think a key to understanding David is to recognize the sinner in all of us.  Are we a people after God’s own heart?  We might look at our own lives and say, well, no, It doesn’t look like I’m not a man after God’s own heart.  Look at all the things I’ve done that are bad.  If they could see who I really am, they would know me for what I am.  A sinner.  Just like David.

But God teaches us that what is important is not so much what we do, but what’s inside.  Back in 1 Samuel 16, the prophet Samuel was seeking a king over Israel.  The Lord sent him to Bethlehem because the Lord had selected a son of Jesse to be king.  When Samuel got there, he saw Jesse’s son Eliab who apparently looked like Thor and said, “whoa…

“Surely the Lord’s anointed stands here before the Lord.”

But the Lord answered in verse 7,

“Do not consider his appearance or his height, for I have rejected him. The Lord does not look at the things people look at. People look at the outward appearance, but the Lord looks at the heart.”

Slide4And there’s the answer.  David’s heart, despite his sinful nature, was always pointed at the Lord.  When confronted about his sin, David didn’t just confess his sins, he repented and went to the Lord for forgiveness.  When faced with overwhelming odds like when he faced Goliath the giant, David trusted in the Lord.  David meditated on God’s word and wrote over half of the Psalms.

       III.      Background of Messy People: Saul

So the Lord chose David to be king of Israel, but like I said, people are messy.  There was already a king in Israel, his name was Saul.  Saul also demonstrated successes and failures like David, but there was a big difference.  Even when Saul knew what the Lord’s will was, he often would do something else.  Including trying to kill David because of Saul’s jealousy. 

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Saul had 4 sons and 2 daughters.  Of the sons, Jonathan was the oldest; then came Abinadab, Malchishua and Ish-bosheth.  There’s some confusion that in 2 Samuel 21:11, 7 sons of Samuel are put to death, but those include grandchildren because at least one of them was a son of Jonathan.  And the two daughters, Merab and Michal.

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Saul’s jealousy was complicated; he seemed to alternate between loving David as a son and trying to kill David as an enemy.  David was close to Saul’s family; David’s best friend as a child was Jonathan, and Saul’s daughter Michal was in love with David.  In 1 Samuel 18:17, Saul promised to give his oldest daughter Merab to David as a prize for killing Saul’s enemies.  But Saul double crossed David and gave Merab to some other man. 

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But since Saul was jealous of David and knowing David was in love with the younger daughter Michal, Saul promised David he could have Michal if David attacked the Philistines.  Saul was hoping David would be killed in the attack, but David won, so Saul had to give Michal to David for his wife.

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Saul tried to kill David outright at this point, but David’s wife Michal helped David escape.  That apparently made Saul mad, David not dying like he was supposed to, escaping with the help of his daughter.  Saul declares the marriage null and void, then Saul then gave Michal to different man, and Michal was married to Paltiel, son of Laish.

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Despite Saul trying to kill him, David didn’t retaliate against Saul.  If David was aware of the New Testament (which he wasn’t), he might have considered this verse, Romans 13:1-2,

Every person is to be in subjection to the governing authorities. For there is no authority except from God, and those which exist are established by God.  Therefore whoever resists authority has opposed the ordinance of God; and they who have opposed will receive condemnation upon themselves.

David may have been selected by God to be king, but David respected the office of King Saul.  David spent years hiding in deserts and caves while Saul hunted him.  One of my favorite stories about David is in 1 Samuel 24.  Saul is hunting David, and had to stop and tinkle.  So he went into a cave, but David was already hiding there.    While Saul is tinkling in a corner, David sneaks up and cuts a corner off of Saul’s robe to prove that David could have killed Saul but didn’t.  What I find funny about that story is that David feels guilty about it.  He should have never cut a piece of garment off of the king’s robe, that’s just wrong, even if the king is trying to kill him.

David had another chance to kill Saul in 1 Samuel 26.  Saul is hunting David, again, but Saul gets tired, so that night Saul lays down to sleep, but he has a bodyguard, Saul’s cousin Abner.  David sneaks into Saul’s camp, finds Saul sleeping next to a spear.  He could have easily killed Saul with Saul’s own spear, but instead David takes the spear, runs over to the next hill and taunts the bodyguard.  “Hey Abner!  Is that how you guard your king?  I could have killed him, but instead, I have his spear!  Neener neener neener!”

This goes on for many years, Saul hunting David and David hiding, but Saul has another set of enemies, the Philistines, and there’s a big battle brewing between Saul and the Philistines at Mount Gilboa.  Saul of course seeks spiritual advice, but Saul believes the Lord has stopped talking to Saul, probably because Saul is trying to kill the Lord’s anointed king, David.  So Saul consults a witch instead.  I’m going to suggest that if for some reason you cannot hear the Lord speaking to you, then spend time in the Word until you do.  Don’t consult a witch, ok?  In fact, let’s take a quick look at 1 Chronicles 10:13-14,

Saul died because he was unfaithful to the Lord; he did not keep the word of the Lord and even consulted a medium for guidance, and did not inquire of the Lord. So the Lord put him to death and turned the kingdom over to David son of Jesse.

Slide24So, don’t consult a witch, ok? 

 IV.      Background of Messy People: Abner and Ish-Bosheth

So Saul is dead, and David is finally king, right?  I told you people are messy.  Abner, Saul’s cousin and bodyguard, is very well-connected.  David becomes king over the tribe of Judah, but Abner takes Saul’s remaining son Ish-bosheth, and makes Ish-bosheth king.  Abner is able to get the other 11 tribes to unite around Ish-bosheth.  And I wish Ish-bosheth had an easier name to pronounce because saying Ish-bosheth several times in a row is a real tongue-twister.

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Actually, Ish-bosheth does have another name.   When Ish-bosheth was born, his name was Eshba’al which means “Man of the Lord.”)  Here’s a rabbit hole we’re going to follow for just a wee little bit: the definition of “ba’al” means “lord,” or alternatively “master” or “husband.”  The word had been around in early Hebrew as a generic term, but in later years the Canaanites started using “Ba’al” as the proper name of their pagan god.  The Philistines eventually started worshipping Ba’al but changed his name to Beelzebub.  In later Old Testament scripture, “Beelzebub” became known as a major demon, and Christians know the name Beelzebub as another name for the prince of demons.  In the year 1818, Jacques Auguste Simon Collin de Plancy wrote a book called “Dictionnaire Infernal” or a book on demonology who described Beelzebub as having the ability to fly.  He then became known as “The Lord of the Flyers,” or later, “The Lord of the Flies.”

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Anyway, yuck.  That’s enough of that rabbit trail.  Back to Eshba’al, Saul’s remaining son established by Abner as king over 11 tribes of Israel, the Northern Kingdom couldn’t bear to call him Eshba’al because it sounded like a profanity, being ruled by man of demons.  So they changed his name to Ish-bosheth which translates as “man of shame.”  Not exactly a flattering name, “man of shame,” but better than sharing the name of a demon.

Anyway, Ish-bosheth was sort of a puppet king over 11 tribes of Israel, controlled by Abner, and between them continued to wage war against David, the king of Judah.

I think they got tired of fighting so often.  In 2 Samuel 2, Abner’s men meet David’s men, led by David’s captain named Joab, at the pool of Gibeon, and they decide rather than everybody fight, each side would select 12 people to fight each other.  It says in 2 Samuel 2:16,

Each one of them seized his opponent by the head and thrust his sword in his opponent’s side; so they fell down together.

It sounds to me like everybody died, but commentaries say that David’s captain Joab won the battle.  Abner and his men run away, and David’s men start to chase.  Joab has a brother named Asahel who spots Abner and chases him, but when he catches up to Abner, Abner abruptly stops and kills Asahel with a spear.  Joab is inconsolable and vows to kill Abner some day, but for now, Abner escapes back to safety.  These two sides fight for the next 2 years with David’s army generally winning and Abner’s side generally losing.

So Abner gets back to Ish-bosheth, and Ish-bosheth makes an accusation.  The old dead king Saul, Ish-bosheth’s father, had a concubine named Rizpah.  Apparently Rizpah belongs to Ish-bosheth now, but Ish-bosheth accuses Abner of having an affair with Rizpah.  All of this background information just to bring us to the first scripture we’re supposed to study today, 2 Samuel 3:8 which we looked at earlier:

Then Abner was very angry over the words of Ish-bosheth and said, “Am I a dog’s head that belongs to Judah? Today I show kindness to the house of Saul your father, to his brothers and to his friends, and have not delivered you into the hands of David; and yet today you charge me with a guilt concerning the woman.

Slide2Ah, now I have a better understanding of what’s going on.  Location, location, location.  Abner has spent his life playing political games, first with Saul and then propping up Ish-bosheth as the so-called king.  And this is how Ish-bosheth repays him, by accusing Abner of having an affair with Rizpah the concubine?  Abner is furious. 

I re-read this scripture several times and couldn’t help but notice Abner said he was innocent of the charges.  He’s just mad that he’s been accused.  In fact, Abner is so mad, he tells Ish-bosheth that he’s going to give the 11 tribes of Israel to David so David can finally be the king over all Israel, just like the Lord said he would. 

And Ish-bosheth is too scared to say anything.  What could he say?  Abner had all the power, Ish-bosheth was just a puppet.

             V.      Background of Messy People: David and Michal

So Abner goes to David and tells David, “hey, let’s stop fighting.  You agree not to kill me, and I’ll agree to give you the rest of Israel.”  David goes, “hmmm…. Let me think.”

And David agrees, on one additional condition.  Remember Michal?  Saul’s youngest daughter than Saul gave to David for his wife, then took Michal away and gave to another man named Paltiel?  David wants her back.  Abner can come work for David, and all David wants is all of Israel and his wife Michal back.

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Abner agrees.  I mean, it’s not like Abner is giving away anything of his own, right?  David sends a message to Ish-bosheth, and without Abner telling him what to do, Ish-bosheth doesn’t know what else to do.  Of course David can have Michal.  I mean, it’s not like Ish-bosheth is giving away anything of his own, right?  2 Samuel 3:15-16,

Ish-bosheth sent and took her from her husband, from Paltiel the son of Laish.  But her husband went with her, weeping as he went, and followed her as far as Bahurim. Then Abner said to him, “Go, return.” So he returned.

Aww. People can be pretty messy.  David might have loved Michal, but Michal had a new husband, and Paltiel loved her very much and followed her like a lovesick puppy until Abner stopped him and told Paltiel to go back home.

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All David’s conditions are met, Abner has surrendered, David has Michal back as his wife, and our study scripture for today ends in 2 Samuel 3:20-21a,

Then Abner and twenty men with him came to David at Hebron. And David made a feast for Abner and the men who were with him.  Abner said to David, “Let me arise and go and gather all Israel to my lord the king, that they may make a covenant with you, and that you may be king over all that your soul desires.”

And David finally becomes king of all Israel, fulfilling the Lord’s selection as king.  I thought this was kind of a weird spot to end or story today, though.  Most soap operas continue week after week after week, but we get about 30 minutes, and we have a lot of unanswered questions.  Did they all live happily ever after?

          VI.      They All Lived Happily Ever After.  Not.

Short answer:  No.  Not really.

Michal was not happy to be returned to David.  In the years they were apart, David wasn’t exactly pining away for her.  During the years they were separated, David took a 2nd wife and then a 3rd, each time making political marriages to secure money and supplies.  While David was living in the dessert, Michal’s affection for David began to fade.  When Abner sent for he and gave her back to David, Michal pleaded to stay with Paltiel, the lovesick puppy. 

By all accounts, Michal and David never regained intimacy; the scripture says that Michal remained childless.  The last time we hear about Michal is after she and David fight when the Ark of the Covenant is brought back into Jerusalem, and scripture doesn’t mention her again.

Abner probably had aspirations of becoming a powerful figure under David, but those aspirations were unfulfilled.  Joab, David’s captain, had been away during this time, but when he returns and finds Abner at the city gate immediately kills Abner in revenge for killing Joab’s brother Asahel.

Joab stayed in Israel for many many years, serving King David, until later in David’s life.  David’s son Solomon is set to inherit the title of King from his father David, but Joab offers his allegiance to David’s oldest son Adonijah and eventually flees, assassinated years later and buried somewhere in the wilderness.

Ish-bosheth was assassinated shortly by two of his own army captains shortly after Abner gave away Israel to David.  David honored Ish-bosheth as a king and had him buried in Abner’s grave.

       VII.      Conclusion

There are lots of little lessons in todays scripture.  Perhaps you saw something in one of those characters that resonated with you.  Broken dreams of love.  Aspirations of power to rule.  Revenge against those who hurt you.  I wanted to focus just on the history today, just to lay a groundwork of how messy people can be. 

Probably what I found so compelling is that everybody was messy, everybody had problems, everybody made mistakes.  And yet, our of all thes dysfunctional people, David was considered a man after God’s own heart. 

And it occurred to me that a good summary could probably be the same thing the Lord told the prophet Samuel when David was selected over his older brother Eliab.  People look at what we say and what we do.  The Lord look at our heart.  It doesn’t matter if we succeed or fail, the Lord loves us for who He created.

David did indeed become king of all Israel.  David begat Solomon, and then a great many begats occurred in Matthew chapter 1 until approximately 1000 years later, our Lord Jesus Christ was born to show us how non-messy people are supposed to live.  And He has invited us to invite Him in, so that we are not defined by our own failures, but by the sacrifice of the Lord Jesus Christ who lives within us.

I don’t know if I’m as messy as David or Abner or Michal.  I know I make my own messy mistakes.  But praise be to Jesus that I’m not defined by what I made, but by what He made.

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David was a man after God’s own heart, and received an earthly crown.  If we seek Jesus, we too receive a crown.  Scripture mentions the joy of receiving these crowns, the Crown of Righteousness, the Crown of Victory, the Crown of Life, the Crown of Glory, the Crown of Rejoicing.  In the times yet to come, the book of Revelation tells us we joyfully throw these crowns at the feet of Jesus when we all get to heaven.

When we all get to heaven

What a day of rejoicing that will be

When we all see Jesus

We’ll sing and shout the victory

To God be the glory.  Amen.

Blind to Sin

David and Bathsheba
David and Bathsheba
Today we’re going to study a familiar story of David and Bathsheba. One of the questions I’ve had is “Why is David considered a man after God’s own heart,” especially after reading this story of David’s adultery. Why is David held in so much esteem, yet Saul is not? I think we’ll get a better picture of God’s perspective after we see the way David approaches the sin in his life.

First, though, we need to ask ourselves what sin is. I have an article from USA Today Religion section from earlier this year. According to a poll by Ellison Research, 87% of US adults believe in the existence of sin, which is defined as “something that is almost always wrong, particularly from a religious or moral perspective.” I’m a little disturbed that 13% don’t believe in sin, but let’s focus on the 87% that do. Given a list of sins, 81% believe adultery is a sin. 74% believe racism is a sin. But premarital sex? Only 45%. The story goes on to explain that people have a situational view of sin, and that the secular world has taught us to redefine the word “sin” to fit whatever we believe.

But that’s not what God says sin is. Sin is “missing the mark” for God’s will in our lives. Sometimes sin is an evil thing we think or do. Sometimes it’s a sin of omission – God has a plan for us, but we’re not following it. It’s not that we’re doing evil, it’s just we’re not doing the good that God wants.

It is true that we are forgiven for our sins. Praise the Lord, Halleluiah. But that doesn’t mean God doesn’t see the sin, and it doesn’t mean there aren’t repercussions from sin. The bible is clear; God hates sin. As Christians, we should hate sin, too. But too often we justify that a certain amount of sin is ok, and we use secular reasoning to do it. Too often we rationalize a certain amount of sin as ok, as we are all sinners and God will forgive us. And too often the sin is so deeply embedded that we don’t even notice it anymore. We become blind to the sin in our lives that God hates.

What’s amazing is that if you have become blind to your own sin, you don’t even know you are blind. Let’s try an experiment to see if you have a blind spot. Here’s a figure from a website called “Idle Theory.”

Hold the sheet of paper (or the screen) about 3 to 4 times as far as the red line. Close your left eye, and look at the black dot with your right eye. Keep your head motionless, look at each character, one at a time, until the black circle vanishes. At about a 20° angle, the dot should disappear. And the older we get, the bigger this blind spot becomes.

What’s totally amazing about our blind spot is that our brain fills in the missing information so we don’t even know something is missing. Look at this second figure:

Do the same exercise; close the left eye, hold your head still, and look at each character until the black dot disappears. But when the dot disappears, the line appears solid. There’s no gap. And green background is solid. Your brain has simply filled in what it thinks is there.

Now you’re probably wondering, just like I am, how this relates to David and Bathsheba. Let’s turn to 2 Samuel 11.

David has so far been a great king for Israel. He has consolidated Israel and Judah into a single kingdom; he’s made Jerusalem the capital. The Amorites and other enemies have been pushed back. And now, while David’s men are fighting a war, David is home, sleeping late. In 2 Samuel 11:2, David goes for a walk. And we see a cascading series of little decisions that lead to big sins. Would somebody like to read 2 Samuel 11:2-5?

One evening David got up from his bed and walked around on the roof of the palace. From the roof he saw a woman bathing. The woman was very beautiful, and David sent someone to find out about her. The man said, “Isn’t this Bathsheba, the daughter of Eliam and the wife of Uriah the Hittite?” Then David sent messengers to get her. She came to him, and he slept with her. (She had purified herself from her uncleanness.) Then she went back home. The woman conceived and sent word to David, saying, “I am pregnant.”

It appears that, at least at first, that both David and Bathsheba are innocent. David is simply going for a walk on his roof, and Bathsheba is taking a ceremonial bath. But both are already on the slippery slope. Why is Bathsheba bathing in a place seen by the palace roof? If David knows he can see into the bath from the roof, why is he taking a stroll up there?

EXPOSED TO SIN

The first step to committing sin is placing ourselves in a position where we have the opportunity to sin. If David was following the Lord’s will, he should have been with his men fighting for Israel. Instead, he’s lollygagging around the palace doing the peeping tom thing over the women’s bathroom.

You know what they say about idle hands? That idle hands are the devil’s workshop? One sure way to resist the temptation to sin is to keep busy with the Lord’s business. Since David isn’t doing anything for the Lord, Satan finds something for him to do. Paul tells us in 1 Corinthians 6:18 that we are to flee from sexual immorality. David’s not fleeing. He’s probably even justifying it with, “Well, I was just going for a walk. I’m innocent.” Just like we Christians are innocent when we watch “Desperate Housewives” or “Sex and the City.” We think we’re innocent, but we’re not. We’ve simply turned our head so that the sin is in our blind spot.

SIN COMMITTED

Remember last week when Fred taught us the ABC’s? Attitude first, leads to behavior, and then consequences? David’s attitude is that he doesn’t treat sin with the same contempt that God does. He’s tolerated a little peek into the women’s bathroom. Since his attitude isn’t right, neither is his behavior. After spying on Bathsheba, next David asks about her. Then David invites her to the palace. Then David seduces her.

Now come the consequences. Bathsheba is pregnant. Because of David’s position, this is an inconvenience. The average man may panic that he’s having a child out of wedlock that will expose his adultery, but because David is king, he’s able to maintain the blind spot of sin. In verse 6-8, he calls Bathsheba’s husband, Uriah, back from the battle. David makes small talk about the battle, then sends Uriah home to spend the night with his wife. Nobody will know that the child is David’s; Uriah will think the child is his.

Except Uriah’s sense of duty won’t let him go home. Since Uriah’s men are in battle, Uriah decides to sleep at the entrance to the palace with other servants of the king. Then in verse 10, David asks “What is WRONG with you? Go HOME you fool!”

Uriah says he can’t in good conscience go home when his men are camped in open fields. David tries again, this time by getting Uriah drunk, but again, Uriah didn’t go home.

What do you think is going through David’s mind? I believe he’s worried he’s about to get caught in his sin. He’s not worried about sinning against God; he’s worried about getting caught. 2 Corinthians 7:10-11a says,

Godly sorrow brings repentance that leads to salvation and leaves no regret, but worldly sorrow brings death. See what this godly sorrow has produced in you: what earnestness, what eagerness to clear yourselves, what indignation, what alarm, what longing, what concern, what readiness to see justice done.

David has worldly sorrow. He knows he’s messed up big time, but instead of concern to right the wrong, David is trying to cover it up. As so often with a single sin, a multiple of sins are committed trying to hide the first sin. David sends Uriah back into battle and directs him to go where the fiercest fighting is, and worse, writes a letter to the commanding officer that when the fighting was at its peak, he is to withdraw and let Uriah die.

Christians tend to think that it’s non-believers that are entangled in sin, but it’s not true. We may no longer be slaves to sin, but it doesn’t mean we are not tempted nor fall into sin. California recently voted to define marriage as between one man and one woman. Christians believe that, and further say that homosexual marriage is an affront to God. We vote this way, we say, to maintain the sanctity of marriage. We say this with a monumental amount of hypocrisy, as though the sanctity of marriage was intact. The divorce rate among Christians make as much of a mockery of the sanctity of marriage as homosexual marriage does. Premarital sex makes a mockery of Christian marriage. Adultery makes a mockery of Christian marriage. We watch R-rated movies where actors have sex right in front of us, all the while claiming that sex should only be between a husband and a wife. We’re hypocrites. We have a blind spot, and we don’t even know we’re blind.

Where has God been during all this? God’s letting man exercise his free will. Max Lucado said, “If there are a thousand steps between us and God, he will take all but one. He will leave the final one for us. The choice is ours.” But there will come a time when God’s mercy must be balanced with God’s justice. Let us remember that God hates sin, and if we have a blind spot, God will eventually expose it in order to eradicate it. God isn’t interested in our worldly sorrow. God doesn’t care if we get caught. God wants us to live righteous, holy lives. When we are in darkness, God wants us to walk in the light. And so God sends word to David in order to bring godly sorrow and repentance.

SIN CONFRONTED

2 Samuel 12:1-4,

The LORD sent Nathan to David. When he came to him, he said, “There were two men in a certain town, one rich and the other poor. The rich man had a very large number of sheep and cattle, but the poor man had nothing except one little ewe lamb he had bought. He raised it, and it grew up with him and his children. It shared his food, drank from his cup and even slept in his arms. It was like a daughter to him.
“Now a traveler came to the rich man, but the rich man refrained from taking one of his own sheep or cattle to prepare a meal for the traveler who had come to him. Instead, he took the ewe lamb that belonged to the poor man and prepared it for the one who had come to him.”

Jesus used parables frequently to tell the truth. Parables are earthly stories with heavenly meanings. When we hear the parable, we make a judgment, and the judgment condemns us. It opens our eyes to that blind spot we have. David has progressively committed sins, first lust, then adultery, then murder. The prophet Nathan delivers the truth to David.

How does God communicate the truth to us today?

How did Nathan’s visit reveal God’s grace?

SIN PERSONALIZED

2 Samuel 12:5-6,

David burned with anger against the man and said to Nathan, “As surely as the LORD lives, the man who did this deserves to die! He must pay for that lamb four times over, because he did such a thing and had no pity.”

How did David respond to the story? Parables judge the listener, and David correctly judges the sin. Did you notice how quickly and harshly David judges the sin of others? Exodus 22:1 requires 4 sheep in compensation for the rich man’s greed, but David thinks the man should also die for his sins.

And then Nathan brings the point of the story home. David has judged himself. Nathan says in verses 7 that David is the rich man in the story. “You’re the man!” he says. Nathan tells David that God has made David king, delivered him from Saul, given him a wife and given him the houses of Israel and Judah, if this was too little, God would have given him even more.

David essentially condemns himself. Why is it important to personalize our sins? It’s because in the abstract, we condemn sin. When it comes to our own sin, we rationalize it. Jesus gave us a list of sins that come from the heart in Mark 7:21-22; evil thoughts, sexual immorality, theft, murder, malice, and more. In the abstract, we condemn these sins and we know they’re wrong. Personalized, we turn a blind eye. Theft? Of course we know to steal is wrong. Ever taken a pencil from the office that didn’t belong to you? It’s ok, though, because pencils are cheap, right? Ever steal some time from your company to work on personal business? Debauchery is wrong in the abstract, but have you ever sent an improper email to a friend? Hatred and discord are wrong in the abstract, but our own road rage is ok, isn’t it? After all, they’re probably a jerk, right?

We turn a blind eye to our own sins at our own peril. Yes, we are indeed forgiven, but our sins still displease God. It is our obedience that pleases God. Paul gives us a similar list of sins Galatians 5:19-21; “The acts of the sinful nature are obvious: sexual immorality, impurity and debauchery, idolatry and witchcraft,” and more. The very next sentence, Paul writes, “I warn you, as I did before, that those who live like this will not inherit the kingdom of God.” Paul is not writing these words to heathens and the secular world. Paul is writing these words to the church of Galatia, Christians who have a blind eye to their own sins.

SIN JUDGED

There are indeed consequences for our sin. If our hearts are not right, then it leads to behavior that has consequences. In 2 Samuel 12:9-12, the judgment of the Lord comes to David –

Why did you despise the word of the LORD by doing what is evil in his eyes? You struck down Uriah the Hittite with the sword and took his wife to be your own. You killed him with the sword of the Ammonites. Now, therefore, the sword will never depart from your house, because you despised me and took the wife of Uriah the Hittite to be your own.’
“This is what the LORD says: ‘Out of your own household I am going to bring calamity upon you. Before your very eyes I will take your wives and give them to one who is close to you, and he will lie with your wives in broad daylight. You did it in secret, but I will do this thing in broad daylight before all Israel.’ “

1. How did David’s punishment fit his crime?
2. What is the significance of the contrast between secret and daylight?
3. How might David had acted differently if he had seen the consequences of his sin ahead of time?

Sometimes the sin affects the innocent. It is David and Bathsheba that sin, but David’s family that suffers the consequence. It’s one of sin’s most terrifying realities. David’s sinful behavior toward Bathsheba and Uriah has long lasting repercussions and sadness within David’s own family. David’s newborn son conceived in sin will die, and as a result of David’s negative example, his other children suffer violent tragedies, death, and rebellion.

SIN CONFESSED AND FORGIVEN

In 2 Samuel 12:13-14,

Then David said to Nathan, “I have sinned against the LORD.”
Nathan replied, “The LORD has taken away your sin. You are not going to die. But because by doing this you have made the enemies of the LORD show utter contempt, the son born to you will die.”

A few weeks ago, when we studied 1 Samuel 15, Saul was told to wait 7 days for Samuel to arrive, then to destroy the Amalekites completely. Saul instead spared the king and the cattle and livestock. God didn’t want the sacrifice nearly as much as He wanted Saul’s obedience. What Saul did seemed harmless enough, to save the life of the king and livestock. But when we do not completely obey, we miss the mark, we sin.

When Samuel arrived, he asked, “What is this bleating of sheep and this lowing of cattle that I hear?” He exposed the sin of Saul, just as Nathan exposed the sin of David. Saul responded with a good excuse – Saul claimed he saved the cattle to sacrifice to the Lord.

I think we get a glimpse into why David was a man after God’s own heart. What was David’s reaction to his judgment? David repented. David offered no excuse, no justification, no rationalization. He simply said, “I have sinned against the Lord.” In Hebrew, David said just two words, “chata’ Y?hovah.” David wrote Psalm 51 in response to Nathan’s message; your homework, should you choose to accept it, is to read Psalm 51, a beautiful tribute to God for His mercy in the face of David’s disobedience. David begins “Have Mercy on me, O God,” continues with “surely you desire truth in the inner parts, you teach me wisdom in the inmost place” and “Create in me a pure heart, O God.”

God wants us to see our sins as He sees them. Hebrews 6:6 says that the unrepentant sin of a Christian is like crucifying the Son of God all over again. Our sins give God’s enemies opportunities to blaspheme God. It turns us into poor witnesses for Him. It spoils the fruit we are to have for Him. God wants us to confess our sins to Him, He wants us to repent and turn from our sins and turn towards obedience. Instead of confession, though, we deny our sin. We leave the sin in our blind spot because then we don’t have to personalize it, confess it, or turn from it. Because we don’t believe it exists.

How do we overcome this blind spot? Again, we can learn from David. In Psalm 139:23-24, David writes,

Search me, O God, and know my heart; test me and know my anxious thoughts. See if there is any offensive way in me, and lead me in the way everlasting.

Like practically everything else God tries to teach us, we are not to lean on our own understanding. If there is sin in our blind spot, ask God to search you. How do we ask God to search us? Romans 3:20b says that through the law, we become conscious of sin. Hebrews 4:12 tells us the Word of God is a double-edge sword that judges the thoughts and attitudes of the heart. As you search the scriptures, ask God to search you. Once God reveals our character to us, then we can confess that we are missing the mark. Then we can turn to the life that God would have us lead. Eventually, God will confront us about the hidden sins we cling to. Ask God to search you for hidden sin. Recognize it, confess it, and despite forgiveness, expect consequences.

1 John 1:8-10 –

If we claim to be without sin, we deceive ourselves and the truth is not in us. If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just and will forgive us our sins and purify us from all unrighteousness. If we claim we have not sinned, we make him out to be a liar and his word has no place in our lives.

God held that David was a man after God’s own heart. Not because David was perfect or righteous or never sinned. Rather, when David finally took off his blinders and saw the sin in his own life, he hated the sin as God hated the sin. We all sin. If you can’t see your own sin, ask yourself if you’re in denial. Pray to God to show your sin to you. And once you identify the sin, don’t pretend it isn’t there. Confess it, and then turn away from it. If you don’t, God will eventually show it to you anyway, and possibly with painful consequences. God hates the sin. God will offer forgiveness for the sins you confess.

Amazing Grace, How Sweet the Sound
That saved a wretch like me.
I once was lost, but now I’m found
Was blind, now I can see

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