PBS and the Separation of Church and State

When the US Government funds anything remotely Christian in nature, all sorts of “separation of church and state” groups get upset. The ACLU files a lawsuit and the “offensive” Christian material is removed.

So why is it ok for US tax dollars to be used to oppose Christianity? Shouldn’t the same standard be used? PBS, a government funded liberal and atheist propoganda tool (not that I’m opinionated on the subject) is funded by the US government and is producing a show that attacks the underlying tenets of the bible.

Among other things, this show says –

  • Abraham, Sarah and their offspring didn’t exist.
  • There is no archaeological evidence of the Exodus.
  • Monotheism was a process that took hundreds of years.
  • The Israelites were actually Canaanites.
  • The Israelites believed that God had a wife.

For me as a Christian, it’s bad enough when free speech is exercised to attack my beliefs; my right to free speech also belongs to others to say the opposite. Will my tax dollars also be used to fund a show friendly to my beliefs? Probably not; the ACLU will sue to prevent the use of tax dollars for Christian-friendly projects. So why is the government allowed to fund an attack on Christianity?

Christian Carnival CCXIX

c. 1220
Chasing the Wind is honored to host the 219th edition of the Christian Carnival II, the blogosphere’s best Christian writing. My comments on the post in italics after each entry, but I left the author’s original thoughts when he or she provided them. I included almost all posts I received; I excluded two from the same blog that were more about “the power of positive thinking” that didn’t seem to mention Christianity, and a similar post about raising children from a site mostly dedicated to gardening. Oh, and I excluded an advertisement blog for Branson Missouri. If I excluded your post and you don’t agree, email me and let me know why I erred and I’ll correct it.

Submit your blog article to the next edition of christian carnival ii using our carnival submission form. Past posts and future hosts can be found on our blog carnival index page.

Christian Carnival 208

Welcome to the 208th edition of the Christian Carnival, a weekly amalgomation of this week’s best Christian writing. Chasing the Wind is humbled to host such a fine collection of postings this week; I suggest picking a few titles below and clicking them; you won’t find a finer collection of Christian thoughts anywhere on the web.

Steven Krager presents What Kanye teaches us about culture and values posted at faithdoubt, saying, “Can Kanye West teach us about culture and values?”

FMF presents Why I Post on The Bible and Money posted at Free Money Finance, saying, “Details why a money blog posts on the Bible.”

Rodney Olsen presents Sy Rogers talks sexuality and the church posted at The Journey – Life : Faith : Family.

Renae presents Strength in Weakness posted at Life Nurturing Education.

Tia presents Seeking Contentment in a Broken World: Exploring Traumatic Countertransference posted at On Journeying with Those in Exile, saying, “Dan asks some questions about what to do with the pain he feels for the Broken world and how it relates to imitatio Christi in having cruciform love.”

ChristianPF presents Financial lessons from Solomon posted at Money in the Bible | Christian Personal Finance Blog, saying, “The Bible says that Solomon was the richest man who ever lived and also the wisest ever to live. I think that makes him qualified to give some financial advice.”

Nadege presents More shall be given posted at Clearly Envision.

Martin LaBar presents Where is God when things hurt us badly? pt. 4 posted at Sun and Shield, saying, “Why is there suffering in the world?”

William Meisheid presents Choices, Then and Now posted at Beyond The Rim, saying, “Some thoughts about choices and how they affect our spiritual maturity, both in earlier times and now.”

Leslie Carbone presents Dirty Tricks in the Land of Sacred Honor posted at Leslie Carbone.

Chris Brooks presents Experience vs Evidence posted at Homeward Bound, saying, “When should we share our personal experiences in evangelism or apologetics as opposed to offering evidence?”

Diane R. presents We Are Too!….So There! posted at Crossroads: Where Faith and Inquiry Meet, saying, “Many younger Christian leaders today are criticising the evangelical church for it’s recent history of neglecting the poor. But what do you think we’ve been doing for the past 100 years?”

Shaun Connell presents Cosmological Argument posted at Rational Christianity, saying, “Explains why the natural requires a supernatural first cause.”

Dana presents Do we need a parental rights amendment? posted at Principled Discovery.

Annette presents Jim’s Sunday Sermon posted at Fish and Cans, saying, “That little word reliance ….. what does it mean to you?”

Thom presents Elder not Old posted at Everyday Liturgy, saying, “Thom writes about the differences of being an elder and being old.”

JR Madill presents Dreaming of a Brave New World posted at Theology for the Masses.

Doug Forrester presents The trinity is a paradox posted at Bounded Irrationality, saying, “I found an illustrative medieval shield that helps to explain the trinity.”

Tom Gilson presents Where Relativism Leads: Focusing the Question posted at Thinking Christian, saying, “Moral relativism’s moral absurdities”

Jennifer in OR presents Disturbing images to stop the whining? posted at Diary of 1.

Richard H. Anderson presents Rewriting Balaam posted at dokeo kago grapho soi kratistos Theophilos.

Weekend Fisher presents The God Who Blesses posted at Heart, Mind, Soul, and Strength.

Mark Olson presents Ecumenism, Creed, Conflict, and Dr King posted at Pseudo-Polymath, saying, “Small “c” catholic is a term we profess in the Creed, many of us every Sunday. What’s that have to do with Dr King’s message and ekklesia? Well, I think they are connected and offer a short essay on why.”

Jeremy Pierce presents Jesus’ Impeccability and Language Acquisition posted at Parableman, saying, “A reflection on how Jesus must have learned language and what it means for questions about whether Jesus made any mistakes.”

JR Madill presents Creating a Universe of Certainty, or, If You Remove Reason, You Remove Doubt (Part 2 of 2) posted at Theology for the Masses.

D.C. Cramer presents American Idolatry posted at Cramer Comments.

10,000 Christians a Day

Via Michelle Malkin via Weasel Zippers (no, really, that’s the name of their website) (and links from National Catholic Reporter and Asia Times, there are 111 million Chinese Christians, and every day there are 10,000 more. By 2050, China will be the third largest Christian nation behine the United States and Brazil.

Ten thousand Chinese become Christians each day, according to a stunning report by the National Catholic Reporter’s veteran correspondent John Allen, and 200 million Chinese may comprise the world’s largest concentration of Christians by mid-century, and the largest missionary force in history. If you read a single news article about China this year, make sure it is this one.

I suspect that even the most enthusiastic accounts err on the downside, and that Christianity will have become a Sino-centric religion two generations from now. China may be for the 21st century what Europe was during the 8th-11th centuries, and America has been during the past 200 years: the natural ground for mass evangelization. If this occurs, the world will change beyond our capacity to recognize it. Islam might defeat the western Europeans, simply by replacing their diminishing numbers with immigrants, but it will crumble beneath the challenge from the East.

Christian Carnival CLXXVIII

Christian Carnival 178 is up at … Chasing the Wind! I have the honor of hosting this week’s carnival, affectionately known as Christian Carnival 178, 2^89th, hexadecimal B2, or binary 10110010. Whew, and I think there were almost that many entries.
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They’re presented here in roughly the order submitted; if you’re a blog author and you don’t see you entry, I’ll be happy to modify the list below. I had to exclude 1 entry from this week’s Carnival; while “positive” in nature, it didn’t represent a Christian viewpoint. And I excluded two humanistic, scientific anti-Christian blogs for obvious reasons.
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if you’re a visitor and curious about Carnival entries, click on a few and read this week’s best Christian blogging.

Barack Hussein Obama: Self-Described Christian

Barack Obama: Self-Described Christian Barrack Hussein Obama describes himself as a Christian and the New York Times is almost besides itself with glee. Notice the picture and how holy Obama appears.

I like Christians, I really do. I happen to be one. But those people that routinely exhibit their Christian faith are routinely trashed by the New York Times. George W. Bush, for instance, would never get a glowing NY Times article abut his faith. Instead, we get scare stories about upcoming theocracies and how important the separation of church and state is. So why does Obama get special treatment for his faith? If the New York Times trashes most Christians but praises Obama, then it’s likely Obama is not like the other Christians. My hackles of suspicion are raised.

I repeat my repetition: liberals are going to try to split the conservative Christian vote by portraying themselves as Christian. Conservative Christianity is bad (separation of church and state! we don’t want a theocracy!) while liberal Christianity is good (wow, Obama is practically a saint!) according to liberal media.

“Be strong and have courage, for I am with you wherever you go,” Mr. Obama said in paraphrasing God’s message to Joshua.

Now, I’m all in favor of liberals quoting scripture. In fact, I’m all in favor of liberals quoting the entire bible. I think liberals (and conservatives, for that matter) that selectively quote scripture to support their position ought to be challenged by scripture the candidate doesn’t like.

As a presidential candidate, Mr. Obama is reaching out to both liberal skeptics and committed Christians. In many speeches or discussions, he never mentions religion. When Mr. Obama, a former constitutional law professor, does speak of faith, he tends to add a footnote about keeping church and state separate.

What I’ve seen in the news recently is more than just a challenge to church and state; it’s a downright hostility to any public policy that mirrors faith. The recent decision by the Supreme Court to uphold partial birth abortion – a decision Obama “strongly disagrees” with – was decided 5-4 justices. All the justices that upheld the ban had Catholic upbringing; those that voted against it did not. This same New York Times that praises the most holy Barack Obama also decries the influence of Catholics in the partial-birth abortion ban. As if any belief that a Christian might hold is automatically suspect, and Christians are OK only if they actively vote against Christian principle in order to demonstrate their progressiveness.

Color me unimpressed with the New York Times hypocrisy.

Blog Against Theophobes

Ah. A lightbulb goes off. I read several posts this Easter weekend about the dangers of forming a theocracy. The Houston Chronicle linked to one at Feet to the Fire:

The banwitdth devoted to the dangers of Church to State is enormous. Being righteous lefties that analysis comes easy to us. As a lefty who is also believer, I also see the other side of that equation and the dangers run in both directions.

I thought this would be interesting. (P.S. to the author of “Feet to the Fire” if you follow a trackback here – run your post through a spell checker) A lot of the post I agree with, but then there’s a hard left turn at the end –

So, what am I saying in this blog against theocracy? I am saying that when we resist the improper influence of clergy and church in secular affairs, we are saving some arrogant and benighted men (usually), and their followers, from themselves. The kingdom they seek cannot be legislated , cannot be built on the bodies of “unbelievers”. That way lies not heaven on earth, but hell.

This has first the supposition that “righteous righties” actually want a theocracy. We are called to be good citizens of our society, and along with that is a responsibility to resist those laws that oppose God. I can’t imagine a more intense “hell on earth” than to live in a society with *no* Christian influence. Murder is ok, sure. Sleep with your neighbor’s wife, see if I care. Nah, not my kind of society.

But I passed on participating; I thought it was just an outlier post. But then I read another, and then another… what the heck? A whole bunch of lefties suddenly start preaching against forming a theocracy?

Ah. It was an organized blogswarm against theocracy. I’ll make another note that the lefties do not want to lose the 2008 election to Christians so they’re going to do their best to supporting Christianity at the same time they oppose any Christian influence.

Evangelical Outpost has a reasoned response to the blogswarm –

The theophobes, however, are a bit unique in that they embrace an infantile brand of libertarian socialism.* Like other leftists, they tend to advocate for collectivist government solutions. But their support ends when government interferes with their “rights” to do as they please. This is why they hate–and hate is not too strong a word–people who refuse to keep their religious beliefs in the closet. Christians, in particular, are considered a group that is always trying to impose their bourgeois standard of morality on society despite how it makes some people feel.

There’s no doubt about it – Christianity makes people uncomfortable because God’s law is perfection that is a light on our darkness. It convicts us of our sin. That makes us feel guilty and helps lead us to the way, the truth, and the life. But lefties don’t like that sort of judgement, and they prefer to see only the God of love. But the God is also Righteous Judgement, and that’s the part lefties don’t like. In other words, I believe they often worship an incomplete God.

This is why it is impossible to take these people seriously. Their crack-pot conspiracy theories rarely bear any resemblance to reality. Do they seriously think that a country with a thriving abortion industry, a pornified pop culture, and where even speaking ill of homosexuality is considered déclassé is in danger of becoming a theocracy?

I recommend reading the entire Evangelical Outpost article. And don’t forget that the lefties will be practicing their technique all the way to the 2008 election to split the Christian vote.