Stimulus Plan Kills Older People

Ok, so that’s a scare title. But not by much.

Buried deep in the so-called Stimulus Plan are new government-mandated health-care restrictions. Here are some snippets –


The bill’s health rules will affect “every individual in the United States” (445, 454, 479). Your medical treatments will be tracked electronically by a federal system.




One new bureaucracy, the National Coordinator of Health Information Technology, will monitor treatments to make sure your doctor is doing what the federal government deems appropriate and cost effective. The goal is to reduce costs and “guide” your doctor’s decisions (442, 446).




Hospitals and doctors that are not “meaningful users” of the new system will face penalties. “Meaningful user” isn’t defined in the bill. That will be left to the HHS secretary, who will be empowered to impose “more stringent measures of meaningful use over time” (511, 518, 540-541)




Hospitals and doctors that are not “meaningful users” of the new system will face penalties. “Meaningful user” isn’t defined in the bill. That will be left to the HHS secretary, who will be empowered to impose “more stringent measures of meaningful use over time” (511, 518, 540-541)




Daschle says health-care reform “will not be pain free.” Seniors should be more accepting of the conditions that come with age instead of treating them. That means the elderly will bear the brunt.




The stimulus bill will affect every part of health care, from medical and nursing education, to how patients are treated and how much hospitals get paid. The bill allocates more funding for this bureaucracy than for the Army, Navy, Marines, and Air Force combined (90-92, 174-177, 181).



I think most Americans will object to this being buried in a panic-induced overreaching deficit bill without debate. Why is our Obamanation ramming stuff like this down our throats without debate? If these are so important, why can’t they be voted on individually so each portion can be judged on its own merit?

Please, government, stop helping us. We can’t afford it. Just put the checkbook down, back away, and nobody will get hurt. We don’t need a “stimulus” plan. It’s that’s sort of government “help” that got us into this mess in the first place.

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Feverish Dreams

I’m a little under the weather. Whatever *that* phrase means. Aren’t I always under the weather?

I came down with a cold or flu right after wearing those colonial clothes in my last post. Nothing major; sniffles, running nose, occasionally cough. My eyes burn and my scalp is tender. I may have a low grade fever that comes and goes.

I didn’t eat much yesterday, and drank a 20 oz bottle of Diet Coke in the afternoon. I think the lack of food, the excess caffeine, and the shot of Nyquil I took before bedtime gave me weird, weird dreams. I don’t feel like I slept, though I’m sure I did. My brain felt active all night, stumbling across weird images, propositions, conversations.

My dreams are always active; it’s like going to the movies. Usually, there’s some sort of plot or esoteric meaning (or perhaps only some regurgitated bell pepper) in my dreams, but last night was just random stuff. I’ll give you a sampling; tell me if it makes your brain go *pop*.

I’m dreaming that my laptop is on the fritz; no matter what application I’m using, pressing the F1 “Help” key pops up pictures of random zoo animals. I take it to, where else, a hospital, to have my laptop looked at.

While I’m waiting for my turn to see a doctor, Tom Cruise comes in. Apparently, he’s had some sort of stroke, but before the doctors medicate him, he wants somebody to call his fiancée. Except he now has an odd lisp, and it comes out “fiance-pay.” The doctor asks what the heck a fiance-pay is. Since I have a laptop, I thought I’d google the entertainment news to see if Tom Cruise is actually engaged, but I can’t get Internet Explorer to come up.

As an alternate, I decide to look up “fiance-pay” to see if that’s a real word, but my Microsoft Word aborts with an error. I press F1 for Help, and a drawing of an aardvark pops up on my screen, and the doctor asks me why I’m looking at aardvarks at a time like this.

I think the word “aardvark” sounds funny, so I repeat it 3 times. Aardvark, aardvark, aardvark… and wake myself up laughing at the word aardvark.

Awake yet again, I roll over, and start the next random Nyquil-and-caffeine-induced dream sequence. And I thought of stuff just like this all night long.

Today, I’m very tired. And sniffly. And drinking another Diet Coke.

Review: The Case for the Real Jesus

Medium ImageChristian apologetics books can be pretty dry, but Lee Stroble makes it warm and personable. Instead of lecturing the reader on such topics as “Did the church alter early gospels to suit a political purpose?” and “Was Jesus married to Mary Magdelene,” the author instead takes you on a journey to visit world renowned archaeologists and historians. These sources are not necessarily Christian; Strobel is looking for sources that believers and non-believers can respect.

Then Strobel narrates his visits with these experts, asking tough questions while describing the chair he’s sitting in and the hospitality of his experts and how refreshing the hot tea they serve.

One thing is clear from his research – most of the questions raised in major madia and fiction such as Dan Brown’s work are easily debunked. Historical inaccuracies and a misunderstanding of Jewish culture abound in the “alternative” gospels; in most cases, it is possible to trace these other books to gnostics, Syrians, and other groups trying to push an agenda.

That still goes on today, doesn’t it?

If you’d like to read an excerpt, Zondervan has made one available at The Case for the Real Jesus. Whet your appetite; I think you’ll find it’s an excellent addition to an apolgetic’s library.