Rejected

I. Introduction

I think sometimes we just coast through our own lives without thinking much about it. I got up, I went there, I came back, I ate this, I went back to sleep.

But along the way, we constantly make choices. What to wear, what to eat. Who to vote for, who not to vote for. At some point in our lives, we chose whether to believe in Jesus, or whether not to believe in Jesus. And if we choose to believe, we choose a view of Jesus we want to believe. One only of love and compassion? One of deliverance? One of obedience?

Our entire lives are a series of related decisions. Already today, we have made decisions that impacted where we are right now or what we are wearing. Even the color of our shirt or dress might be influenced by another decision made earlier in the day. Some decisions have very little importance. Some have life or death consequences.

How and why and when we choose or reject Jesus impacts so many other areas of our lives. Sometimes it affects what we wear. Sometimes it affects who we vote for.

Today we are studying the early life of the ministry of Jesus, and the people of Nazareth faced a decision about Jesus. That decision will lead to consequences.

II. Context Luke 4:1-44

At this point in the life of Jesus, Jesus had been affirmed Spiritual highs often precede spiritual tests. At His baptism, Jesus was affirmed by John the Baptist, the voice of God from heaven and the Holy Spirit on Him as a dove.

Jesus was led to the desert, fasted without food or water for forty days and nights, and tempted by Satan with three tests. You are probably not surprised Jesus passed with flying colors, and immediately after, Jesus returned to His hometown of Nazareth. This may be an even bigger challenge than the devil. Jesus is challenged by people. Prideful, sinful, fallen, free-will people.

These people had known Him since he was a small boy. Jesus’ synagogue was full of familiar faces. Jesus made two broad statements we will study in more detail. First, Jesus read messianic text from Isaiah 61 and declared the prophecy to be fulfilled. The people reacted to that statement with amazement and approval.
And then Jesus reminded them that God did not accept people based on their religious heritage but by their faith. How did the people react? They flew into a furious rage and tried to kill Jesus. Sometimes people want God in their lives, as long as God is on their terms. So let’s get into the details.

III. True Identity Luke 4:16-21

Luke 4:16-17,

And Jesus returned to Galilee in the power of the Spirit, and news about Him spread through all the surrounding region. And He began teaching in their synagogues and was praised by all.And He came to Nazareth, where He had been brought up; and as was His custom, He entered the synagogue on the Sabbath, and stood up to read. And the scroll of Isaiah the prophet was handed to Him. And He unrolled the scroll and found the place where it was written:

We will get the actual Isaiah scripture soon but let us examine what Jesus was doing. In Nazareth, His childhood home, during the Sabbath, Jesus as a good Jew was there. The scripture says, “as usual” or “as was His custom.” He was there with people He probably knew since He went every week.

Now in the synagogue, members of the synagogue or sometimes visitors would be invited to read Scripture and offer any comments. These were not books like we have today; usually scripture was copied onto sheets of papyrus or parchment that were joined to make a scroll.

These scrolls were often stored in clay pots like this (***). The famous Dead Sea Scroll were stored in similar pots.

Our scripture says Jesus stood up to read, as was the custom, and the scroll containing the words of the prophet Isaiah were handed to Him. Since the scroll was given to him, we might assume this Scripture had already been designated for this week. On the other hand, He could have requested the book of the prophet Isaiah specifically. Either way, Jesus unrolled the scroll to Isaiah 61 and it says “He found the place where it was written” so Jesus is purposefully looking for this next scripture.


“The Spirit of the Lord is upon Me,
Because He anointed Me to bring good news to the poor.
He has sent Me to proclaim release to captives,
And recovery of sight to the blind,
To set free those who are oppressed,
To proclaim the favorable year of the Lord.”

These verses are from Isaiah 6:1-2, and the Jews at the time recognized this as a well-known messianic text. When we get to Luke 7, if you recall, John the Baptist later sent messengers to Jesus and asked,

Are You the Coming One, or are we to look for another?

And Jesus answered with words from this prophecy,

Go and report to John what you have seen and heard: people who were blind receive sight, people who limped walk, people with leprosy are cleansed and people who were deaf hear, dead people are raised up, and people who are poor have the gospel preached to them. And blessed is anyone who does not take offense at Me.”

In Jesus’ day, Isaiah was where people turned to hear the “good news” of the Kingdom of God – a kingdom where God will:

1. Comfort His people (Isaiah 40:1, 2, 11: 51:5; 52:9; 54:7-8; 55:7; 61:2-3),
2. Help the poor and needy (Isaiah 40:29-31; 41:17; 55:1-2),
3. Heal the sick and broken (Isaiah 42:18; 43:8-10),
4. Forgive sins (Isaiah 44:22; 53:4-6, 10-12),
5. Judge the wicked, and
6. Renew all things (Isaiah 42:9-10; 43:18-19; 48:6; 65:17; 66:22).

Moreover, Isaiah is clear that this good news will be accomplished through God’s chosen, humble, spirit-filled Servant . (Isaiah 42:1-4; 45:4; 49:3-5; 52:13-53:12).

The Isaiah prophecy is written in the first person; the pronoun “me” does not refer to Isaiah. This is the future Messiah speaking, and there are multiple prophecies filled by Jesus.

• First, the Spirit of the Lord was on Him. John the Baptist in John 1:33 testified that God had told him he would see the Holy Spirit resting on the One who was coming. And then at Jesus’ baptism, the Spirit descended on Him as a dove. This verse is also one of the verses than mention God the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit at the same time. The Father anoints the Son in the presence of the Spirit.

• Second, the Isaiah Messiah declares that the Holy Spirit’s work included anointing the Messiah. The word Messiah, or Christ in the Greek language, means “Anointed One.” The sentence structure implies that the Messiah is appointed, was appointed, and will continue to be appointed. God anointed Jesus at His baptism and from that point on He was the Christ.

• Jesus’ anointing involved God’s empowerment to preach good news to the poor. The gospel would not be complete until Jesus’ death and resurrection. However, the good news of God’s initiation of salvation har arrived with Jesus and His ministry.

• While the message had special application for the poor, it was not limited to the poor. Both Old and New Testaments testify to God’s concern for the poor. In the Old Testament, God gave numerous commands in Leviticus and Deuteronomy to protect and care for the poor. Likewise, Jesus and the apostles cared for the poor throughout their ministries.

• And it says in Isaiah 61 that the purpose of the Messiah is to set free the oppressed and then again proclaim release to the captives. It is good news and a proclamation. Those who are held captive by force can find release in Christ. Those who are oppressed by hardship and shattered lived can find hope in Christ. Each of these phrases can refer to physical or spiritual conditions, and it also proclaims the way Christ sets us free from sin and its penalty. These are truly gracious words for anyone who hears them. If you are surrendering to sin, God sent Jesus to win your forgiveness. If you are oppressed, God sent Jesus to liberate you. If you are poor, blind, in debt, or have been defrauded, God sent Jesus to assure you that He will make things right. This is an undeserved gift that God, rich in mercy, had been promising since Genesis 3:15. And with the coming of Jesus – in the power of the Holy Spirit – God has kept His promise.

• The Messiah also has a ministry of recovery of sight to the blind. Jesus literally caused the blind to see on several occasions, but this ministry also has a metaphorical application related to people who were spiritually blind. Nothing illustrates this metaphor more clearly than John 9:39,

And Jesus said, “For judgment I came into this world, so that those who do not see may see, and those who see may become blind.”

• The Messiah announced the year of the Lord’s favor, good news indeed. This phrase stands in contrast the next verse in Isaiah 61:2b, “day of our God’s vengeance” which Jesus omitted in this reading. Jesus’ first coming proclaimed God’s favor. When Jesus returns a second time, He will accompany God’s judgment. That time is also called “the day of the Lord.”

Luke 4:20-21 –

And He rolled up the scroll, gave it back to the attendant, and sat down; and the eyes of all the people in the synagogue were intently directed at Him. Now He began to say to them, “Today this Scripture has been fulfilled in your hearing.”

The people must have been astonished. Jesus had performed miracles recently in Capernaum, then he arrives, reads a piece of scripture that proclaims He is the Anointed One, and then sits down, finished. No wonder they stared at Him intently. And it says in the next verse, the people were encouraged and positive about these gracious words. Scripture has been fulfilled. The Messiah had arrived and come to offer salvation.

IV. False Understanding – Luke 4:22-27

But… you knew there was going to be a “but”, didn’t you? Verse 22,

And all the people were speaking well of Him, and admiring the gracious words which were coming from His lips; and yet they were saying, “Is this not Joseph’s son?”

Up to this point, all the people were speaking well of him, but they did not understand what He meant by the prophecy being fulfilled. They thought Jesus was just a local hometown boy. The question – Isn’t this Joseph’s son? – was rhetorical. Of course this is Joseph’s son.

The absence of any reference to Joseph’s presence here or in future gospel narratives strongly suggests Joseph had died by this time. Most likely, the phrase Joseph’s son simply was a point of reference to Jesus’ family background.

Verse 23,

And He said to them, “No doubt you will quote this proverb to Me: ‘Physician, heal yourself! All the miracles that we heard were done in Capernaum, do here in your hometown as well.’”

Jesus responded to the congregation with a popular saying: Doctor, heal yourself. This proverb is not found in the Book of Proverbs but was a common saying among the Jews and other cultures, even today. The statement means the people wanted Jesus to do miracles here in Nazareth first, because He was local. The people had heard about the miracles that took place in Capernaum. From Nazareth in central Galilee to Capernaum on the north shore of the Sea of Galilee was just over twenty miles. News spread quickly. They wanted Jesus to perform a miracle in His hometown so they could see for themselves.

Verses 24-27,

But He said, “Truly I say to you, no prophet is welcome in his hometown. But I say to you in truth, there were many widows in Israel in the days of Elijah, when the sky was shut up for three years and six months, when a severe famine came over all the land; and yet Elijah was sent to none of them, but only to Zarephath, in the land of Sidon, to a woman who was a widow. And there were many with leprosy in Israel in the time of Elisha the prophet; and none of them was cleansed, but only Naaman the Syrian.”

Jesus would not allow their misunderstanding of His nature or purpose to push Him into doing the very thing Satan had tried in vain to make Him do. He would not misuse His divine powers for personal advantage. He understood that no prophet is accepted in his hometown. They’re likely thinking, “that’s not God, that’s just Jesus from down the street.”

But Jesus went on to give two examples of how God worked outside of popular expectations. He reminded them of Elijah’s days. Elijah prophesied during the ninth century before Christ. His ministry was primarily in the Northern Kingdom under Ahab and Ahaziah. The famine that came over all the land resulted from God’s word through Elijah to King Ahab. You can read about this in 1 Kings 17. During the three years and six months that followed, no rain fell as the sky was shut up. Jesus pointed out that there were many widows in Israel during this time. But God did not send relief to the widows in Israel.

After declaring the coming catastrophe, Elijah fled from Ahab for fear the king would kill him. At first, the prophet hid by the brook Cherith. He drank the water and was fed by ravens (1 Kings 17:3-6). When the brook dried up due to drought, God sent Elijah to a widow at Zarephath. This small town was on the coastal area near the Mediterranean Sea near the larger city of Sidon. The point of Jesus’ statement was that God did not send Elijah to the widows of Israel but directed him north, beyond the borders of Ahab’s kingdom. This statement was received as an insult to the Jews’ national pride.

Then Jesus offered an even stronger analogy by referring to the healing of Naaman. Naaman was commander of the Syrian armies during the ministry of Elisha, who followed Elijah as prophet in Israel. You can read about this in 2 Kings 2. A Hebrew slave girl told Naaman’s wife about the prophet’s power to heal. After being humbled and submitting to Elisha’s direction to wash in the Jordan River, Naaman was healed. There were many in Israel who had leprosy, but not one of them was cleansed. Jesus’ pointed out that God chose to heal a Gentile while not healing Jewish lepers. This story was also received as an insult to the Jews’ national and religious pride.

The Nazarenes basically ignored God’s grace as Jesus announced it. Now Jesus confronts them with the full truth of the situation: they are rejecting Him, and His salvation blessings will go to others. It is not a truth they want to hear.

As God’s humble Servant, Jesus knows He will be “despised and rejected by men” (Isaiah 53:3). He had come “to his own, and his own people did not receive him” ( John 1:11). One of the ironies of Scripture is that Jesus’ rejection at home opens the way for God’s salvation for gentiles like us. Indeed, this was God’s plan. Jesus understood this, He taught it to his apostles, and they preached it continually (Luke 9:22; 24:7; Acts; Romans 9-11).

Through His rejection, death, and resurrection, Jesus is the “cornerstone” of God’s Kingdom, which consists of people from every tongue, tribe, and nation (Revelation 5:9). It matters not where a person comes from, only whether they receive Jesus. For some people, Jesus is a stone of stumbling and offense (Luke 20:17-18; Romans 9:32-33; 1 Peter 2:8), for others, He is the rock on which a new life is built (Luke 6:47-48; Acts 4:11-12; Psalm 118:22; 1 Peter 2:6-7).

We all have to examine what we think we believe about Jesus. When churches teach only part of the character of Christ, they’re not teaching Jesus. Yes, Jesus is love, and Jesus is forgiveness, but he’s also judgement and obedience and righteousness. These hometown Jews thought they knew Jesus. They had watched Him grow up. Even if He had become some kind of miracle worker, they probably thought He should know His place and show some respect. Jesus’ sermon shook their ideas about His identity. They didn’t understand that Jesus did not come to fulfill their purpose – Jesus came to fulfill God’s purpose.

V. Misguided Response, Luke 28-30

Luke 4:28-30,

And all the people in the synagogue were filled with rage as they heard these things; and they got up and drove Him out of the city, and brought Him to the crest of the hill on which their city had been built, so that they could throw Him down from the cliff. But He passed through their midst and went on His way.

Everyone in the synagogue was enraged when He challenged their prejudices. People who are emotionally invested in a belief often become enraged if that belief is opposed. The people were indignant, wrathful, their emotions were fierce. The people did not get mad when Jesus claimed that He fulfilled Isaiah’s messianic prophecy. That was good news to them.

Instead, they became enraged when they heard the two stories about Elijah and Elisha. They liked having a miracle worker for the Messiah as long as this Messiah did what the people wanted, to fulfill their national and religious ambitions. Jesus said God’s favor would come to people outside of Israel. It struck at the deepest core of the Jews’ bigotries.

They rushed at Jesus. They wanted to destroy Him. They drove him out of town. They possibly grabbed His arms to force Him out.

Nazareth was located in the Galilaen highlands which make up the southern ridge of the Lebanese mountain range. The town was built on a hill that had a steep slope. From there, the mob was intending to hurl him over the cliff. Their religious fervor was leading them to do a very ungodly deed.

Similarly, in today’s world, many religious zealots use their religious beliefs as an excuse to impose their faith by violence and to attack anyone who challenges them.

This was not to be the time, place, or manner for Jesus’ death. He did not fear death, but His mission had only begun. Many miles lay ahead. He miraculously escaped from them and went on his way.

And Jesus went back to Capernaum, where He continued His miraculous ministry of healing the sick, casting out demons, and preaching the gospel of the kingdom.

Rejection of Jesus does not change who Jesus is. People may refuse to believe in Christ, but their lack of faith affects them, not Him. Sometimes we feel rejected by people because we follow Jesus. He warned His disciples that in doing so, such people are not really snubbing us, they are rejecting Him (Matt. 10:22). We should not expect any better treatment. Like Paul the apostle, we can count it joy to suffer for Christ’s sake (Matt. 5:10-12; Acts 5:41). We can go on in faith, trusting to see His victory (1 Pet. 3:14).

VI. Conclusion

There are three major takeaways from Jesus’ Sabbath proclamation in his hometown. Choices along our way in this life –

First, reject the “Nazareth Way.” Jesus’ hard-hearted Nazarene neighbors had several major problems, including

1. They think Jesus is just like them. They know him as “Joseph’s son,” a local boy. But Jesus is the “radiance of God’s glory and the exact expression of his nature, sustaining all things by his powerful word” (Hebrews 1:3). Modern people sometimes make the mistake of thinking Jesus is a slightly better version of themselves. That’s Nazarene thinking. Jesus is God in the flesh.

2. They think they deserve VIP treatment from Jesus. Because they have known Jesus for years, they expect Him to do special miracles for them. In their hearts, they exalted themselves before Jesus and as a result they are humbled (Luke 14:11). The best title anyone will ever claim before God is not VIP, but “unworthy servant” (Luke 17:10).

3. They care more about external signs than internal realities. The Nazarenes miss the meaning of Jesus and the Scriptures because they keep everything on the surface level. They ignored the perilous condition of their hearts because they are looking for a spectacle. We should guard against this temptation too. No external sign can accomplish what God’s word can do in a human heart (Luke 16:31).

4. They are quick to anger, judge, and condemn. It is astonishing how quickly the Nazarene’s go from speaking well of Jesus to attempted murder. Human hearts are fickle, and people who are prone to “fits of anger” live in a dangerous place. They will not inherit the Kingdom of God (Galatians 5:21). This is why Scripture commends not judging others harshly (Luke 6:37) and being slow to anger ( James 1:19) – this is Godly character.

Second, do not reject Jesus! As bad as the Nazarene’s problems appear, God can forgive them all through Jesus Christ. This is possible because the “day of God’s vengeance” is still “not yet.” We live in the “year of the Lord’s favor,” when forgiveness is offered to everyone, and salvation is announced around the world! Salvation is a glorious reality of hope, peace, purity, and joy in the present, with an even greater expectation for the future. Someday, Christ will return to bring God’s vengeance on everyone who rejects Him, but as long as it is “today” we must “not harden” and reject Jesus (Hebrews 3:7-19)

Finally, do not fear rejection – from God or from people. Here is why:

1. God does not reject you. He sent Christ to pay for your sins so that you could be united to Jesus (Romans 6:5), adopted into His family (Ephesians 1:5), chosen, holy, loved, and forgiven (Colossians 3:12-13). Moreover, Jesus himself promised that whoever comes to Him He will never cast out ( John 6:37). Finally, the Holy Spirit is given to every believer as a sign and seal of God’s acceptance (Ephesians 1:13). If you have called Jesus your Lord, you need never fear His rejection (1 Corinthians 12:3).

2. Jesus endured human rejection on your behalf. As we have seen, Jesus was rejected by people. He did it to bring us to God (1 Peter 3:18). The Apostle Peter also argues that Jesus’ rejection and suffering gives us an example for our own trials which lead to greater holiness and the spread of the Gospel (1 Peter 4:1-6).

3. The Holy Spirit will empower you to withstand human rejection. Jesus promises that His followers will sometimes be rejected for His name’s sake (Matthew 5:11; John 16:33). He gives Christians the Holy Spirit so that they will be able to stand boldly in the face of all opposition (Acts 4:13; Ephesians 6:10). If you have a Bible, then you have God’s Holy Spirit inspired words. That is the perfect weapon for answering all human rejection (Luke 12:12; Ephesians 6:17-18).

To God be the glory.

The Promised Messiah

Zechariah title  I.      Introduction

We’re continuing our study of the minor prophets, and these minor prophets have stark messages.  These messages display God’s glory and how God communicates both His love and His wrath, and how they are both consistent with His character, that our God is a consuming fire that loves us gently, and He has given us what we need for service in this world and eternity with our Lord forever.

Through the minor prophets, we learn 3 things about God –

  • God is sovereign.   He alone is God.  He alone is King.  He alone is the Creator.  He alone has the right to judge what is right and wrong.  He alone is the great I AM.
  • God is holy. He is perfect, He is all that is good.  His holiness is untainted by evil, there is no sin in His presence.  His wrath will destroy all that is evil, judged with perfect justice, revenge belongs to Him alone.
  • God is love. His wrath is withheld so that no one may perish, but have everlasting life.  He has given us His one and only son as a perfect sacrifice, not because of anything we have done, but simply because He loves us.

Zechariah is one of the more difficult of the minor prophets, not just for the Jews living under the Law at the time, but for us Christians today.  Many of the verses are full of symbols and imagery; there are lampstands and menorahs, olive trees, flying scrolls, and a woman in a basket.  Fortunately, there’s an angel speaking to Zechariah that explains much of the imagery, but it’s still a challenging book to understand.

Zechariah imagery

Zechariah was a young man when he began his ministry; some scholars suggest he may have been as young as 16 years old.  He was a contemporary and friend of the prophet Haggai, and while Haggai encouraged the people of Jerusalem to rebuild the temple, Zechariah encouraged the people with the hope of a coming messiah and reign of glory.

The Book of Zechariah is divided primarily in 2 “advents.”  The word “advent” means the arrival of something important, especially something that has been awaited.  The first 9 chapters, which we’ll study today, prophecy the advent of Jesus Christ in Jerusalem.

Let’s take a peek at our key verse today Zechariah 9: –

Zechariah 9:9

Rejoice greatly, Daughter Zion!
Shout, Daughter Jerusalem!
See, your king comes to you,
righteous and victorious,
lowly and riding on a donkey,
on a colt, the foal of a donkey.

This is the 1st advent, a prophecy of Jesus’ arrival in Jerusalem 500 years after Zechariah, of Jesus riding into town on a donkey, what we now call Palm Sunday.  Coincidentally, or perhaps not, today is Palm Sunday, so I think it is so very appropriate that we’re studying this today.

The second half of the book of Zechariah concerns itself with the 2nd advent, or the 2nd coming of Jesus.

Zechariah 14:3-4,9

Then the Lord will go out and fight against those nations, as he fights on a day of battle.  On that day his feet will stand on the Mount of Olives, east of Jerusalem, and the Mount of Olives will be split in two from east to west, forming a great valley, with half of the mountain moving north and half moving south.  The Lord will be king over the whole earth. On that day there will be one Lord, and his name the only name.

Revelation tells us that one day every knee will bow to our Lord Jesus Christ, but there are certain benefits to bending our knee voluntarily.

Today, as we look forward to Easter on this Palm Sunday, we are going to focus on the 1st advent, Zechariah’s prophecy of a messiah for Israel.

II.      Examine the Prophecy

Most people who study Old Testament prophecy can point to the book of Isaiah for prophecy about Jesus the Messiah.  Verses like …

  • Will be born of a virgin (Isaiah 7:14)
  • Will have a Galilean ministry (Isaiah 9:1,2)
  • Will be an heir to the throne of David (Isaiah 9:7; 11:1, 10)
  • Will have His way prepared (Isaiah 40:3-5)
  • Will be spat on and struck (Isaiah 50:6)
  • Will be disfigured by suffering (Isaiah 52:14; 53:2)
  • Will make a blood atonement (Isaiah 53:5)
  • Will bear our sins and sorrows (Isaiah 53:4, 5)
  • Will voluntarily accept our guilt and punishment for sin (Isaiah 53:7,8)
  • Will be silent before His accusers (Isaiah 53:7)
  • Will be buried in a rich man’s tomb (Isaiah 53:9)

These are not the only prophecies about Jesus, of course.  The Books of Daniel, Zechariah, Malachi, Ezekiel – indeed, the entire Old Testament points to a Messiah who will suffer and die for us, taking away all of our sins.

The Jews understood – intellectually, at least – these prophecies of a messiah.  This messiah would be a mighty king of both victory and peace.  In Zechariah 9:9, the messiah is king –

Zechariah 9:9

Rejoice greatly, Daughter Zion!
Shout, Daughter Jerusalem!
See, your king comes to you,
righteous and victorious,
lowly and riding on a donkey,
on a colt, the foal of a donkey.

The messiah king would usher in a new day for Jerusalem.  The days of captivity would finally be behind them, they would be free to worship and serve the king of the Jews.  The Jews had not had a king since Babylon destroyed the temple, and this verse told the people that a king of impeccable character, righteous and victorious, was coming for them.  A day to rejoice, a day to shout with triumph, a day to celebrate the arrival of their king.

In Zechariah 9:10, they knew the Messiah would be a man of peace –

I will take away the chariots from Ephraim
and the warhorses from Jerusalem,
and the battle bow will be broken.
He will proclaim peace to the nations.
His rule will extend from sea to sea
and from the River to the ends of the earth.

The Jews understood the coming Messiah to bring peace among men, among distant lands, from Jerusalem to the promised land of Abraham and his descendants to the very ends of the earth. His kingdom would be peaceful, because the Messiah was a victorious conqueror.  There would be no need for weapons for the Messiah to establish His rule.

In the next two verses, Zechariah 9:11-12, the Messiah would be a man of victory –

As for you, because of the blood of my covenant with you,
I will free your prisoners from the waterless pit.
Return to your fortress, you prisoners of hope;
even now I announce that I will restore twice as much to you.

The Messiah would be a mighty conqueror.  Nothing would be able to withstand the might and power from heaven to rescue His daughter Zion from those that would persecute her.  Those that had been captured by evil and confined to darkness would be rescued and set free, given hope and a stronghold in the Lord.

Zechariah often refers to the Lord as the “LORD of hosts”, as in chapter 1 verse 3.   It could also be translated, “LORD of armies.”  This is a powerful name of God, Jehovah, Leader of an army of angels and our strong and mighty tower.  There is no need to fear with such a mighty leader of armies on the side of Zion.

When would this messiah come and rescue them?  We have to look to other Old Testament prophets to get the whole picture, but a key prophecy is found in Daniel 9:25.

Know and understand this: From the time the word goes out to restore and rebuild Jerusalem until the Anointed One, the ruler, comes, there will be seven ‘sevens,’ and sixty-two ‘sevens.’ It will be rebuilt with streets and a trench, but in times of trouble.  After the sixty-two ‘sevens,’ the Anointed One will be put to death and will have nothing.

These “sevens” would have been very familiar to the Jews; each “seven” is a period of seven years, and the end of each seven years the Jews had a Sabbath year.  And for the phrase “from the time the word goes out to restore and rebuild Jerusalem,” we have go back to Nehemiah 2.  Remember just a couple of months ago when we studied this?  Nehemiah was the cupbearer to the king Artaxerxes, and the in the twentieth year of King Artaxerxes, the king asked Nehemiah why he looked so sad.  Nehemiah had been praying for that moment, and he asked the king to let him rebuild the city.

Well, now it’s simple math to determine when the messiah comes.  Artaxerxes came to power in 474BC.  The twentieth year of his rule was 455 BC.  “Seven ‘sevens’” is 49 years, and “sixty-two ‘sevens’” is another 434 years, so the Messiah arrives in 29AD.  And since the Messiah is foretold to be in the temple, when the Romans destroyed the temple in 70 AD, Jews know the Messiah was to have come between 29AD and 70AD.

Zechariah prophecy

The timing of the Messiah has since come and gone, and Jews do not accept Jesus as the Messiah.  But if not Jesus, then who?  I read several rabbinical letters on this subject.  Through the years, the Jews have put their hope in a Messiah on several people through the years such as Bar Kokhba in 132 AD.  Bar Kokhba fought a war against the Roman Empire, defeated the Tenth Legion and retook took Jerusalem. He resumed sacrifices at the site of the Temple and made plans to rebuild the Temple.  He established a provisional government and began to issue coins in its name. Ultimately, however, the Roman Empire crushed his revolt and killed Bar Kokhba. After his death, the Jews said, “well, I guess he’s not the messiah, either.”  Today, the Jews still wait for a messiah.  They believe he didn’t come at the prophesied time because the Jewish people weren’t ready.  The Jewish people will either have to be so good that they deserve a messiah to rule over them, or so bad that they deserve to have a messiah to rule over them.

How did the Jews miss the arrival of their messiah?  They were looking for a mighty warrior.  They were looking for a man of peace.  They were looking for a king in the year 29AD while Jerusalem was occupied by Roman forces.  And then, Jesus came riding to the temple on a donkey.

On one hand, I’m sort of glad the Jews missed the coming of the messiah.  It’s because God knew the Jews would reject His one and only son that the offer was then extended to the gentiles, and gentiles like me have an opportunity to accept this offer of salvation.  God’s not done with the Jews yet, they are still His chosen people.  Following the tribulation, things will be different, and the Jewish leaders will receive Jesus’ love in their heart.

Ezekiel 36:26 –

I will give you a new heart and put a new spirit within you; and I will remove the heart of stone from your flesh and give you a heart of flesh.

III.      Prophecy is true

How many prophecies did Jesus fulfill?  The easy answer is “all of them.”  It’s hard to determine an accurate count of the prophecies, but one study I read counted them at 365 prophecies foretelling the coming Jewish Messiah, of which 109 that *only* Jesus could have fulfilled.

http://bibleprobe.com/365messianicprophecies.htm

Today, we know that Christ died for us on a tree, our sins upon Him and bearing the wrath of God on our behalf, that we may have everlasting life with Him.  It is so obvious, nobody can miss it.

Or can they?  I know people that have accepted Christ, but I know far more that haven’t.  Some might even say they are Christian, but based on their fruit, they would be hard to recognize as believers.  And others are agnostic, unsure of any belief.  And some are atheistic, certain there is no God.  And some follow other gods of their own making.

IV.      Jesus came for us

Why did the Jewish people miss the 1st Advent of Christ?  Or better yet, why do some of us still miss the signs of Jesus in our lives?

John 5:36-40,

“I have testimony weightier than that of John. For the works that the Father has given me to finish – the very works that I am doing – testify that the Father has sent me.  And the Father who sent me has himself testified concerning me. You have never heard his voice nor seen his form, nor does his word dwell in you, for you do not believe the one he sent.  You study the Scriptures diligently because you think that in them you have eternal life. These are the very Scriptures that testify about me, yet you refuse to come to me to have life.”

Jesus must be in our hearts, not just in our heads.  Studying God’s Word is important, but it doesn’t provide salvation.  Evangelizing is important, but it doesn’t provide salvation.  Compassion, good works, attending church, prayer is important, but it doesn’t provide salvation.

The Jewish religious leaders studied the Old Testament diligently.  To them, salvation came with knowledge.  If you understood the word, you were given a place in the kingdom of heaven.  If you didn’t study, you were doomed.

John 7:49 –

The Pharisees said, “But this crowd which does not know the Law is accursed.”

2 Corinthians 3:15 –

But to this day whenever Moses is read, a veil lies over their heart.

But it’s not what you know in your head that counts, but rather faith that trusts Jesus as the Messiah – something these Jewish leaders were unwilling or unable to do.  But we are to believe with our heart, not just our head –

Romans 10:9

If you confess with your mouth Jesus as Lord, and believe in your heart that God raised Him from the dead, you shall be saved.

  V.      Conclusion

Today, in Zechariah 9, we’ve learned that the Messiah was a king, victorious, peaceful, righteous, and humble.

Matthew 21:1-9 –

As they approached Jerusalem and came to Bethphage on the Mount of Olives, Jesus sent two disciples, saying to them, “Go to the village ahead of you, and at once you will find a donkey tied there, with her colt by her. Untie them and bring them to me.  If anyone says anything to you, say that the Lord needs them, and he will send them right away.”
This took place to fulfill what was spoken through the prophet:

“Say to Daughter Zion,
‘See, your king comes to you,
gentle and riding on a donkey,
and on a colt, the foal of a donkey.'”

The disciples went and did as Jesus had instructed them.  They brought the donkey and the colt and placed their cloaks on them for Jesus to sit on.  A very large crowd spread their cloaks on the road, while others cut branches from the trees and spread them on the road.  The crowds that went ahead of him and those that followed shouted,

“Hosanna to the Son of David!”
“Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord!”
“Hosanna in the highest heaven!”

Jesus speaks to us even now.  We must be in His word to hear him, or we miss the message He has for us. We must walk in His ways to see Him at work.  We must be with believers to see His love in action.

Isaiah 53:3-6 –

He was despised and rejected by mankind,
a man of suffering, and familiar with pain.
Like one from whom people hide their faces
he was despised, and we held him in low esteem.
Surely he took up our pain
and bore our suffering,
yet we considered him punished by God,
stricken by him, and afflicted.
But he was pierced for our transgressions,
he was crushed for our iniquities;
the punishment that brought us peace was on him,
and by his wounds we are healed.
We all, like sheep, have gone astray,
each of us has turned to our own way;
and the Lord has laid on him
the iniquity of us all.

Our Messiah has arrived during this celebration of Palm Sunday.  Hosanna to the Son of David.  Blessed is He who comes in the name of the Lord.  Hosanna in the highest heaven.  Thank you for coming for us, king of victory, king of peace, king of righteousness.  King of kings.

Zechariah Palm Sunday

To God be the glory.

Christian Carnival CCLXXVIII

Welcome to the CLXXVIII edition of the Christian Carnival. Whoa, CLXXVIII. That’s a lot of Roman letters just to say it’s the 278th edition.

My apologies for the late edition. Real life, as always, got in the way. No excuses, I’m just late.

This week’s best Christian writing is presented for your intellectual perusement and enjoyment.

Yolanda Lehman presents I RECOMMEND JESUS posted at Ain’ta That Good News?!, saying, “Yolanda Lehman shares an evangelical tool that will help you share Jesus with those you love. In simple, plain language she explains the GOOD NEWS found in scripture! Only God can fill the hole in your heart friends–I recommend Jesus!”

Rosalind P. Denson presents Let It Go posted at A Fruitful Life, saying, “Dr. Denson encourages readers to remember that Jesus taught us to pray, “and forgive us our debts, as we forgive our debtors.” She encourages people struggling with an unforgiving heart to simply “let it go” following the example of Christ.”

NtJS presents Book Review: 7 Steps to Becoming Financially Free posted at not the jet set, saying, “I recently received the book 7 Steps to Becoming Financially Free by Phil Lenahan from the Catholic Company. I was not sure what I would think about this book since I have read so many personal finance books. Could I really learn something new?”

Cecille Carmela presents How Does God Talk To You? posted at Rightful Living, saying, “How does God talk to you? Find out by searching through His deepest desires, through meditation, Bible scriptures and forgiveness.”

Jim DeSantis presents Christian Dating: Four Ways To Find Your Spiritual Match. posted at On Line Tribune | Spiritual Matters, saying, “The Christian faith, most faiths for that matter, teach that we are not to be unequally yoked. In lay terms this simply means we are to be wise when seeking a relationship to avoid future spiritual conflicts that can result in heart break. Here are four ways to find the mate matched to your beliefs.”

FMF presents Is It Ok for a Pastor to Earn $600k a Year? posted at Free Money Finance, saying, “Should there be a limit on how much a pastor makes?”

ChristianPF presents Extravagant Giving posted at Money in the Bible | Christian Personal Finance Blog, saying, “This is a story of some extravagant giving that I have recently been the recipient of…”

Rick Schiano presents Discipline Your Child a Biblical Perspective posted at Ricks Victory Blog.

Rani presents Prayer of the Week for Children- Allowance posted at Christ’s Bridge, saying, “This prayer is a part of my new series of children’s prayers.”

Keith Tusing presents How to Partner with Parents and Protect Kids in Our Culture posted at CM Buzz, saying, “CM Buzz is a site dedicated to encouraging, and providing resources for Children’s and Family Ministers.”

Dana presents Something to be proud of posted at Principled Discovery.

Dana presents A game of catch, a game of life posted at Simple Pleasures.

michelle presents Isaiah 55:8-11 posted at Thoughts and Confessions of a Girl Who Loves Jesus….

Tracy Dear presents Not Condemned posted at New Mercy, saying, “I try to give God glory while I stumble through a difficult marriage. I want to polish the monuments of the things He’s teaching me.”

Shannon Christman presents Why Don’t More Faith Communities Emphasize Simple Living? posted at The Minority Thinker.

Barry Wallace presents ?Angels and Demons? ? Fact, Fiction, Reviews, Questions posted at who am i?, saying, “I ask some questions about the new movie “Angels and Demons” and receive some thoughtful replies.”

Chris DeMarco presents Tears Over Lost Sheep posted at The “C” Branch.

Weekend Fisher presents The gospel: how central is Jesus’ death and resurrection? posted at Heart, Mind, Soul, and Strength, saying, “Weekend Fisher continues a series on what the gospel is and isn’t.”

Rey of The Bible Archive asks serious questions about the method of Christ’s atonement in Theological
Necessity for a Physical Resurrection.

Fiona Veitch Smith presents Christian Speculative Fiction – a ‘lost’ genre? posted at The Crafty Writer.

Chris DeMarco presents Tears Over Lost Sheep posted at The “C” Branch.

Barry Wallace presents ?Angels and Demons? ? Fact, Fiction, Reviews, Questions posted at who am i?.

Weekend Fisher presents The gospel: how central is Jesus’ death and resurrection? posted at Heart, Mind, Soul, and Strength.

Sue has several articles; technically, that’s against the rules, but I’m listing all three anyway –

Sue Roth presents “Like sands through the hourglass, so are the days of our lives…” posted at IN HIM WE LIVE AND MOVE AND HAVE OUR BEING, saying, “A reflection on abandoning self to God.”

Sue Roth presents If he hadn’t risen from the dead, he’d be turning over in his grave. posted at IN HIM WE LIVE AND MOVE AND HAVE OUR BEING, saying, “On the need for Christian unity”

Sue Roth presents Gianna Jessen: she survived “choice” and lived to tell about it. posted at IN HIM WE LIVE AND MOVE AND HAVE OUR BEING, saying, “Read the amazing story of Gianna Jessen, a young woman who survived her abortion. She is an eloquent spokesman for life. And be sure to click the link for her home page. You’ll be able to hear her sing… with the voice of an angel.”

NC Sue presents The unforgivable sin? Or the unanswerable question? posted at IN HIM WE LIVE AND MOVE AND HAVE OUR BEING.

That concludes the CLXXVIII edition of the Christian Carnival. Want to participate? Submit your blog article to the next edition of christian carnival ii using our
carnival submission form.
Past posts and future hosts can be found on our

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