Two Year Blogiversary

birthday cake One year ago, Chasing the Wind was one year old. One year later, Chasing the Wind is one year older. Do the math. 🙂

Last year, 764 posts and 54,000 visitors since April 27, 2004 making 2,825 comments.

This year, 1,237 posts and 5,077 comments, 162,279 visitors. Wheee doggy! I’ve enjoyed each and every one of you, even the Dale earnhardt fans and those looking for pictures of ugly kittens.

I take time this morning to thank God for the many blessings, including this way of expressing my opinions and feelings. And I thank God for you since you sometimes listen to me. 🙂

Separation of Church and State

Here’s an early Christmas present; thanks to CADRE Comments for the tip.

The Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals upheld Mercer County’s right to display in a court house the Ten Commandments along with the Mayflower Compact, the Declaration of Independence, the Magna Carta, and the National Motto (“In God We Trust”). American Civil Liberties Union of Kentucky v. Mercer County, No. 03-5412 (6th Cir. December 20, 2005). The best part, though, was the smackdown the Court gave to the ACLU:

The ACLU makes repeated references to “the separation of church and state.” This extra-constitutional construct has grown tiresome. The First Amendment does not demand a wall of separation between church and state. Our nation’s history is replete with acknowledgment and in some cases, accommodation of religion. After all, we are a religious people whose institutions presuppose a Supreme Being….

We will not presume endorsement from the mere display of the Ten Commandments. If the reasonable observer perceived all government references to the Deity as endorsements, then many of our Nation’s cherished traditions would be unconstitutional, including the Declaration of Independence and the national motto. Fortunately, the reasonable person is not a hyper-sensitive plaintiff. Instead, he appreciates the role religion has played in our governmental institutions, and finds it historically appropriate and traditionally acceptable for a state to include religious influences, even in the form of sacred texts, in honoring American legal traditions.

Barbra Streisand Shows She Misunderstands the Constitution

I’m about to enter a period of extended hours at work, so I’m going to flood y’all with opinions today. 🙂

Barbra Streisand is calling for the impeachment of President Bush.

If there was ever a time in history to impeach a President of the United States, it would be now. In my opinion, it is two years too late. We should have done this before the election to spare the country the misjudgment, the incompetence and the malfeasance of this administration.

A couple of questions for the politically inept Barbra:

  • Did you know your first name is misspelled?
  • Wait, here’s a better question: to impeach somebody, there must have been a law broken. Bush hasn’t been indicted for anything, nor is there any hint an indictment is on the way. What law do you think Bush broke?
  • Clinton committed perjury. Now there’s something impeachable. Did you support the impeachment of Bill Clinton?
  • Why don’t you allow comments on your website?

I understand you’re disgruntled, Ms. Streisand. But “Disgruntling Barbra Streisand” isn’t an impeachable offense.

Thank god the media and the American public are finally waking up and asking the tougher questions now.

It’s the Almighty God with a capital “G”, Ms. barbra with a small “b”. And these “tougher questions” have been asked ever since we toppled Saddam Hussein and answered several times. Thank God that you’re not in charge of our judicial system where officials can be impeached for disagreeing with you.