Persecution & Hope

  I.      Introduction

We begin today a brand new series, and I’m always overwhelmed with the amount of wisdom that is packed into each verse of the New Testament.  We have nine verses to study today, and we could easily do an entire lesson on just the first word.  Got your bibles ready?  Let’s start at 1 Peter 1 verse 1.

II.      To God’s Chosen, 1 Peter 1:1-2

Today’s lesson is actually a very good illustration of something I’ve said numerous times; standing in front of the class to teach is not a goal of mine.  I enjoy sharing what I’ve learned, but actually standing here isn’t something I crave.  But I would say 90% of what I know about the bible has come not from listening to the Word, or even reading the Word, but from preparing to teach.  We have 9 verses to study today, but let’s just read the first two, 1 Peter 1:1-2,

Peter, an apostle of Jesus Christ,

To God’s elect, exiles scattered throughout the provinces of Pontus, Galatia, Cappadocia, Asia and Bithynia, who have been chosen according to the foreknowledge of God the Father, through the sanctifying work of the Spirit, to be obedient to Jesus Christ and sprinkled with his blood:

Grace and peace be yours in abundance.

When I first sit down to study, I read the verse once and sort of let it sink in, sometimes up to a week.  Then when I sit down to prepare, I start jotting notes down and try to arrange them in an outline that makes sense.  Here’s the notes I jotted down from the first two verses –

  • Peter the apostle. Discuss life of Christ, how Peter was selected as a fisherman, denied Christ 3 times.  In the book of Acts, he was described as “unlearned and ignorant,” yet he penned several books of the New Testament and Christ built His church upon him.
  • God’s elect, chosen through foreknowledge, free will versus God’s will, Arminianism vs Calvinism,
  • God’s exiles, sometimes translated as “temporary residents” or “aliens in a foreign land, and how believers with the Holy Spirit inside find their moral values are different from worldly values.
  • Geography, how the Christian church spread in the first century
  • Sanctifying work of the Holy Spirit, not through our own works
  • Obedience in Jesus Christ.
  • Covered by His blood, saved from our own sins by His substitutionary death.
  • Grace and peace, gifts of the Holy Spirit. And in abundance, too.

These are just the topics I identified in just the first two sentences of 1 Peter 1.  My point is, when we study the bible as a class, it is worthy and provides us knowledge, but there is no possibility that 30 minutes a week is sufficient to understand all our heavenly Father wants to teach us.    If you and I want to get closer to our God, then we must spend the time to get to know him in our own individual reading and studying.  It is a privilege for us to be able to study His Word when in so much of the world bibles are difficult to find or are banned outright.

Why were these early Christians in exile?  This world persecution of Christians goes all the way back to the first century church.  While many of the apostles like Peter showed their human weaknesses while Jesus was in their midst, every apostle except John (who died of old age) was eventually martyred proclaiming the good news of the Christ.

In the USA, we believe we see persecution of Christians.  In California, Christian adoption agencies are closing because the state forces all adoption agencies to accept same-sex parents as well as provide contraception as part of their health care for adoption agency employees.  Christian businesses are closing in several states because they won’t make cakes for lesbian couples or take wedding photos for gay men.  These are most definitely challenges and persecution of Christian values.Slide3

But in Philip Yancey’s book, “Where is God When it Hurts?”, quotes Helmut Thielicke, a German minister who survived Nazism and World War II.  Helmut was asked, “What did he see as the greatest weakness among American Christians?”.  Helmut answered, “They have an inadequate view of suffering”.

So while in Houston, Christians struggle to preserve the Ten Commandment display at a Veteran’s cemetery, OpendoorUSA reports that around the world, 322 Christians are killed for their faith every month, and 214 Christian churches are destroyed.  I saw the movie this past week called “The Insanity of God” and the story of a missionary who had traveled the world, witnessed dying children in Somalia, the imprisonment of the faithful in the former Soviet Union, and the persecution of believers in China.  As he spoke to some underground Christians in China, he noted that before the Cultural Revolution of Mao Tse Tung, there were 400,000 Christians.  Today, after decades of persecution, there are 50 million.  And the underground Christians asked the missionary, “Have they heard about Jesus outside of China yet?”Slide4

Sometimes it’s hard to grasp why God allows the persecution of His people, and I can’t begin to understand all of His purpose.  But it’s unmistakable that persecution allows demonstration of His mercies.

 

III.      Saved, Now and Forever, 1 Peter 1:3-5

Have you ever heard the phrase, “Once Saved, Always Saved?”  It was a phrase that I had heard but didn’t think about it too much.  My first thoughts are, “well, it’s not in the bible” and “if you could see the way some people live, they couldn’t possibly be saved.”  And if you continue that line of thinking, eventually you get to wondering, “Am I saved?  And if I am saved, can I lose my salvation?  What do I have to do to earn eternal life?”  In 1 Peter 1, we will find rest for our souls and comfort that our inheritance in the Kingdom of Heaven is secure.  Verses 3-5,

Praise be to the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ! In his great mercy he has given us new birth into a living hope through the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead, and into an inheritance that can never perish, spoil or fade. This inheritance is kept in heaven for you, who through faith are shielded by God’s power until the coming of the salvation that is ready to be revealed in the last time.

Are you pretty sure you’re going to heaven?  How about, unless something goes horribly wrong, there’s a good chance you’re going to heaven?  Or do you absolutely know, without a doubt, 100% guarantee, that you’re going to heaven?  God wants you to know and be absolutely confident, because there is joy and peace in this knowledge.  Let’s look at some other scripture that backs this up.  1 John 5:13,

I write these things to you who believe in the name of the Son of God so that you may know that you have eternal life.

It doesn’t say we should “think” we have eternal life.  It says we may *know* we have eternal life.  It’s not arrogance to say that I know I will go to heaven.  It’s confidence, not in my ability, but in Christ’s sacrifice.  Once a person places their trust in Jesus, God immediately and irrevocably grants that person eternal life and salvation and a guaranteed place in Heaven that can never be lost, regardless of what they do or what they don’t do.  It’s not based on you.  It’s not based on me.  It never was.  It’s entirely based on what Jesus did.

In John 5:24, Jesus says,

Very truly I tell you, whoever hears my word and believes him who sent me has eternal life and will not be judged but has crossed over from death to life.

Jesus uses several tenses of verbs to make His point clear.  When He says, “has” eternal life, Jesus uses the present tense.  Then He switches to future tense, “will not be condemned”.  Jesus says believers have it!  And if that wasn’t clear enough, Jesus says the believer “has crossed over from death to life.”  Jesus switches present tense to perfect tense, and is saying that the believer has already crossed, always will be crossed over from death to life.  We are new creations already, we don’t become new creations after we die.  We *have already* crossed over, we *have* eternal life, and *will not be* condemned.  Past, present and future.

John 3:36:

Whoever believes in the Son *has* eternal life.

John 6:47:

I tell you the truth, he who believes *has* everlasting life.

It is an irrevocable contract Jesus makes with us when we confess Him as our Lord, written here in the Good Book for us to read the fine print anytime we wish.  What does Jesus promise to do for us as our Lord?  Well, here’s the fine print of the contract:

  • Hebrews 10:17, God says, “Their sins and lawless acts I will remember no more.” You and I can’t forget, as hard as we try, but God will remember no more.  Poof, it’s as if they never happened.  With the blood covering from Jesus, we become pure in God’s sight.
  • Philippians 4, our names are inscribed in the Book of Life. Again, not *will be* inscribed.  They *are* inscribed.
  • Romans 8:1, “Therefore, there is now no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus.”   No condemnation.  Freedom.
  • Micah 7:19, “You will again have compassion on us; you will tread our sins underfoot and hurl all our iniquities into the depths of the sea.” Deeper than the Titanic, our sins are buried in the sea.
  • 1 Corinthians 6:19, “Do you not know that your body is a temple of the Holy Spirit, who is in you, whom you have received from God?” The Holy Spirit lives in us, takes up residence, and gives our conscience a kick-start.
  • Galatians 4:6, “So you are no longer a slave, but a son; and since you are a son, God has made you also an heir.” We become adopted by God, we are His children, His heirs.  We are no longer slave to sin and the death that comes with it.
  • Romans 8:31-33, God has chosen us, we are God’s elect, and if God is for us, who can be against us?
  • Ephesians 1:13-14, “Having believed, you were marked in him with a seal, the promised Holy Spirit, who is a deposit guaranteeing our inheritance until the redemption of those who are God’s possession.” Marked, sealed, identified, stamped.  Seems like every translation I read used a different word here.  Signed, sealed, delivered, I’m yours.  We are indelibly branded, permanently stamped, and guaranteed our inheritance.
  • John 10:27-28, Jesus says, “My sheep listen to my voice; I know them, and they follow me. I give them eternal life, and they shall never perish; no one can snatch them out of my hand.” Jesus becomes our shepherd, we become His sheep, He gives us eternal life, we will never perish, and no one can change that.
  • Any loopholes left in this contract? Romans 8:38, “For I am convinced that neither death nor life, neither angels nor demons, neither the present nor the future, nor any powers, neither height nor depth, nor anything else in all creation, will be able to separate us from the love of God that is in Christ Jesus our Lord.”  Looks like an absolutely iron clad contract to me, how about you?

So this salvation we already have.  This eternal life we already have.  Heaven is a destination where we go when our mortal chores are through, but our place there is already guaranteed.  I know if I could do something to lose my salvation, I’d have done it already.  I’ve messed up so many times and if I was given a second chance, I’d just lose it again.   Sometimes I can go for 6 or 8 hours in a row without sinning, but then I wake up and have to get out of bed.  This is great news, knowing we’re eternally saved. In order for us to lose our salvation, all the terms of the contract would have to be abolished.

  • Somebody would have to find some sort of loophole in the contract that isn’t up or down, present or future, angel or demon, and convince Christ not to love us anymore.
  • We would have to change from Christ’s sheep into a toad.
  • We would have to remove the brand He sealed onto us.
  • Somebody would have to snatch us right out of the hand of Jesus even though He chose us.
  • God’s adoption papers would have to be cancelled and He writes us out of the will.
  • Holy Spirit would have to be evicted out of His home in our heart and told to find someplace else to live.
  • We would have to dive to the very bottom of the ocean and dredge our sins back up.
  • Somebody would have to remind God of all the things He’s promised to remember no more.
  • And somebody would have to make God into a liar for putting all these promises down in writing.

Ya know, I just don’t see any of that happening.

So what about all those difficult questions about “Once saved, always saved?”  What if I claim to be a Christian, but don’t seem to be living a Christian lifestyle?  I party and drink and do drugs and sleep around and so forth – am I still going to heaven?  And what if I say I’m a Christian and I know I’m going to heaven, does that mean I can do anything I want?  Lie cheat and steal, take candy from babies or be a serial killer?  Am I still going to heaven?  How about if I say I’m Christian, but then I curse God to His face, turn my back on Jesus and says I want nothing do with those uptight religious freaks anymore?  Am I still going to heaven?  And what about when I hurt or when I’m depressed and I just don’t feel like getting up and going to church anymore?  Am I still going to heaven?

Great questions.  I hope somebody here can answer them, these were hard and I ran out of time studying.  No seriously, they are great questions, and the answers are in this same Good Book.

Number 1.  What if somebody claims to be a Christian, but doesn’t seem to be living a Christian lifestyle?  Partying and drinking and so forth?  I think it’s important to remember that eternal salvation is granted when you confess with all your heart that Jesus Christ is Lord.  God does the rest.  If we think our actions before God are better than somebody else’s actions, we have a fundamental misunderstanding of what Jesus did for us.  Romans 3:20 says,

Therefore no one will be declared righteous in his sight by observing the law.

No one, no matter how good we try to be, is good enough for God.  Any righteousness we have comes not from ourselves but from accepting the blood covering of Jesus’ sacrifice for our sins.  Ephesians 2:8 says,

For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith — and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God — not by works, so that no one can boast.

It has nothing to do with what we do.  We don’t gain eternal life because of our good performance, and we don’t lose eternal life because of our bad performance.  It’s Jesus plus nothing; it’s a gift.  The church of Galatia thought the same thing, and Paul gave them a dressing down.  In Galatians 3 Paul writes,

You foolish Galatians! […] After beginning with the Spirit, are you now trying to attain your goal by human effort?

2 Timothy 2:13 Paul says,

if we are faithless, He will remain faithful.

Getting into heaven has nothing to do with our human performance and everything to do with God’s grace.  We don’t sing Amazing Human Performance in worship for a reason, we sing Amazing Grace.  So if somebody has truly accepted Jesus Christ but doesn’t seem to be living a Christian life, they still have their admission ticket to God’s Grand Afterlife Party.

Number 2.  If our salvation is secure, does that mean we can do whatever we want?  If I’m going to heaven no matter what I do, why does it matter what I do?  Why not lie, cheat and steal?  Why not cheat on my spouse?  Why not party like it’s 1999?  I’m going to heaven!  Well, there’s a serious problem with this.   You may have that invitation to God’s Grand Afterlife Party and you are guaranteed entry, but what you do in this life has everything to do with what kind of reception you’ll get when you get there.  1 Corinthians 3:11-15 says

For no one can lay any foundation other than the one already laid, which is Jesus Christ. If any man builds on this foundation using gold, silver, costly stones, wood, hay or straw, his work will be shown for what it is, because the Day will bring it to light. It will be revealed with fire, and the fire will test the quality of each man’s work. If what he has built survives, he will receive his reward. If it is burned up, he will suffer loss; he himself will be saved, but only as one escaping through the flames.

The foundation is Christ, and with our mortal lives we build on that foundation.  We can build on it with long lasting stuff – obedience, servant hood, prayer, humility, or we can build on it with disobedience, arrogance, and selfishness.  The choice is up to us.  But there will come a day of Judgement where we stand before Christ, and all our earthly deeds will be exposed for what they are.   Everything bad or worthless will be burned away, and if there’s anything left, there’s a reward.  What kind of reward?  I don’t know – I’m guessing something made of chocolate.  All I know if there’s a line forming to collect a reward from the almighty God, I want to be in that line.  What if your building is all gone?  Well, you don’t get any chocolate, but you yourself will be saved.  You’re not in heaven because of the building, you’re in heaven because of the foundation.

Number 3.  What if somebody turns their back on Jesus, renounces God, becomes an atheist.  Are they still going to heaven?  Let me tell you a story about Robert Robinson, a young teen who lived in London from 1735 to 1790.  He was a delinquent teen, but at 17 took his gang to an open air revival service where George Whitfield was preaching to “laugh at the poor deluded Methodists.”  Two and a half years later, Robert Robinson gave his life to Christ.  He felt the call to preach, was appointed by John Wesley to pastor the Calvinist Methodist Chapel in Norfolk England, writing powerful sermons and hymns, and at the age of 23 wrote this powerful hymn:

Come, Thou Fount of every blessing, Tune my heart to sing Thy grace;

Streams of mercy, never ceasing, Call for songs of loudest praise.

Teach me some melodious sonnet, Sung by flaming tongues above.

Praise the mount! I’m fixed upon it, Mount of Thy redeeming love.

Slide21Beautiful hymn, and 250 years later we still praise our Lord with these words.  But these words were a spiritual, prophetic autobiography.  Robert Robinson did not stay in the fold of Christianity, eventually dismissed by the church and he returned to his sinful ways, eventually turning his back on Christianity and became Unitarian who does not believe Jesus was the only Son of the Father.  In his later years, while taking a stagecoach ride, and in a non-Christian condition, a female passenger offered to share a poem with him, that it might help him as it had helped her, and she began to read “Come Thou Fount” to him, and when she got to the third stanza,

Prone to wander, Lord, I feel it, Prone to leave the God I love;

Here’s my heart, O take and seal it, Seal it for Thy courts above.

Robert Robinson broke down and cried and said, “Madam, I am the poor unhappy man who wrote that hymn many years ago, and I would give a thousand worlds, if I had them, to enjoy the feelings I had then.”  Robert Robinson never did return to Christianity, and died denying the deity of Christ.

So what happened?  We can’t know for sure, can we, because we can’t ever know Robert Robinson’s heart.  But we do know this – if he ever truly trusted Christ, then yes, Robert Robinson is in heaven.  Even if we are faithless, God is faithful.  In Matthew 21:18-19, Jesus tells us what happens to people like this.

Early in the morning, as Jesus was on his way back to the city, he was hungry. Seeing a fig tree by the road, he went up to it but found nothing on it except leaves. Then he said to it, “May you never bear fruit again!” Immediately the tree withered.

Slide23In order to produce fruit, you have to be connected to the sap of the Holy Spirit.  If you’re not connected, the best you can produce is leaves, and Jesus says if you’re not connected to the sap of the Holy Spirit, the sap of the church of a body of believers, you wither.  You become bitter and angry.  I’ve never met a person who has accepted Christ and then turned his back on him that was a joy to be around.  They’re hurtful, mean, selfish people.  But when you’re connected to the sap, you produce fruit.  So when you meet a person like this, either they never truly gave their heart to Jesus, or they did give their heart, but through circumstance, weakness, persecution, suffering, whatever, they turned their back on Jesus.  It’s not for us to determine, but the Lord knows their heart, and if they truly gave their heart, they’re in heaven.  But not in the chocolate line, they’re in the … carob line.

Number 4.  What if I just don’t feel saved?  What if I don’t feel connected to the Holy Spirit, or connected to the church.  Am I still going to heaven?  One of Satan’s tricks in our materialistic secular humanistic society is the “do what feels good” philosophy.  Feel bad about debt?  Go shopping until you feel good.  Feel bad about weight?  Eat until you feel better.  Don’t like your spouse?  Get a divorce.  And you look at our society and see what happens to us when we let our feelings determine our direction.   When our feelings are at the wheel, we don’t have any idea what direction we’re headed.

I know exactly firsthand what happens when you let feelings rule.  I have let my feelings drive me right off a cliff.  But you know what?  Christ caught me.  Now instead of trying to get happy and going in whatever direction I wanted to, I let Christ take the wheel and let Him determine the direction, and I ended up far happier than when I was trying to be happy.  Matthew 6:33,

But seek ye first the kingdom of God, and his righteousness; and all these things shall be added unto you.

Feelings aren’t supposed to be driving your around; feelings are supposed to be in the passenger seat.

So do your feelings determine whether you’re going to heaven?  Does John 3:16 read,

For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life,

as long as he feels like it?  John 5:24 says,

I tell you the truth, whoever hears my word and believes him who sent me has eternal life and will not be condemned; he has crossed over from death to life.

How do your feelings change that?  John 10:28,

I give them eternal life, and they shall never perish; no one can snatch them out of my hand.

Unless, of course, they’re unhappy?

Where do feelings come into play?  Our feelings are something we do, and nothing we do will gain or lose our salvation.  I think we try to make this complicated, but it’s almost too simple to believe.  God gives us the gift of salvation, and we say “thanks.”  That’s it, and nothing we do or feel or say will change that.  No performance evaluation, no report card.  Just grace.  Our destiny is already safe, already secure, we are already eternal beings.  And when we are eternal, when we are not afraid to die, then we are not afraid to live.

IV.      Rejoice Always, 1 Peter 1:6-9

This is indeed cause for celebration.  In 1 Peter 1:6-9, Peter goes on to say,

In all this you greatly rejoice, though now for a little while you may have had to suffer grief in all kinds of trials.  These have come so that the proven genuineness of your faith – of greater worth than gold, which perishes even though refined by fire – may result in praise, glory and honor when Jesus Christ is revealed.  Though you have not seen him, you love him; and even though you do not see him now, you believe in him and are filled with an inexpressible and glorious joy, for you are receiving the end result of your faith, the salvation of your souls.

Peter says praise be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, that our inheritance awaits us and to rejoice.  Rejoice!  Again I say, rejoice!  I rejoice because despite the persecution of the church, those who have place their faith in Christ Jesus are already receiving the result of our faith: the salvation of our souls.  We already belong to him and nothing, not death nor life, not angels nor demons, not the present nor the future, nor any powers, not height nor depth, nor anything else in all creation, will be able to change that one teeny bit.  Our destiny is safe.  Today is the day that the Lord hath made.  Let us rejoice and be glad in it.  And let nothing steal that joy, for Christ Jesus loves us so much that He gave His very life for us.  And nothing, absolutely nothing that the world, others, or even ourselves can do, can take that away from us.  We are saved, permanently, now and forever.

Once Saved, Always Saved?  It really is that simple.  Don’t complicate it with man-made judgments and opinions.  Salvation is a gift through Jesus that is eternally secure.  To receive it, all we have to do is ask.  And all we have to do to keep it is… nothing.

  V.      Conclusion

Peter tells us that through Christ Jesus we have come into an inheritance that can never spoil or fade, and that this inheritance is kept in heaven and protected by our all-powerful God.  Let us have no more doubts, no more fears.  Absolutely knowing that there’s not a thing I can do to mess this gift from the Lord brings me peace and inexpressible and glorious joy.  I have been set free.  The salvation of my soul is secure, kept in heaven for me and shielded by God’s power.

To God be the glory.

The Second Coming of Christ

             I.      Introduction

My first thought, when I was asked to teach from 2 Peter, was, “Whoa…. There are *two* Peters?”

Today we’ll study 2 Peter 3; this letter from the Apostle Peter was addressed to persecuted Christians.  During the first few years after the death of Jesus, Christians were considered a sect of the Jewish religion and led by James, the brother of Jesus.  But when the Jews stoned James to death in 62 AD, that cemented hostilities between the Christians and the Jews. The Romans withdrew official protection from the Christians two years later, and then Nero blamed the great fire of Rome on the Christians and outright persecution began.  Peter writes his letter to the church in 95AD to reassure Christians about our eternal life and how we should live while we wait.

The persecution that Peter mentions in 2 Peter 3 is probably better translated as “sufferings,” the letter was probably written to churches outside of Rome who weren’t fed to lions as they were doing in Rome.  Instead, Peter is writing to the surrounding churches as far away as Corinth.  While some persecutions of Christians existed, probably due to governors sympathetic to Nero, it was more likely these Christians were subjected to antinomianism, the belief that grace is so sufficient, that morality is of no use.  As Paul says in Romans 5, , “Where sin increased, graced increased all the more.”  We are saved, dudes, and there’s nothing we can do to lose it, so let’s party.  But this is Christian anarchy.

Even today, this very liberal view of Christianity is very widespread.  “If God loves me and I cannot lose my salvation, then why not party?  God will forgive me.”  But this is like an engaged woman saying, “He loves me and he’s going to marry me, no matter what I do.  Why not play the field a while longer?”  It shows a one-sided love.  It shows God’s love for us, but it also shows we don’t truly love God back.

Of course antinomianism is not true Christianity – Paul addresses this in Romans 6, “What shall we say, then? Shall we go on sinning so that grace may increase?  By no means! We are those who have died to sin; how can we live in it any longer?”  Antinomianism is a false teaching, and it is likely the Roman immorality and paganism was embraced by these false Christian, perhaps to better fit in with the Roman culture, who then either taunted or lured Christians away from their life of purity.  And it is in this setting that Peter writes to the church about our hope in Jesus forever.

          II.      Resist and Rest, 2 Peter 3:1-7

So let’s open to 2 Peter 3 and look at the first 7 verses –

Dear friends, this is now my second letter to you.  I have written both of them as reminders to stimulate you to wholesome thinking.  I want you to recall the words spoken in the past by the holy prophets and the command given by our Lord and Savior through your apostles.

 

Above all, you must understand that in the last days scoffers will come, scoffing and following their own evil desires.  They will say, “Where is this ‘coming’ he promised?  Ever since our ancestors died, everything goes on as it has since the beginning of creation.”  But they deliberately forget that long ago by God’s word the heavens came into being and the earth was formed out of water and by water.  By these waters also the world of that time was deluged and destroyed.  By the same word the present heavens and earth are reserved for fire, being kept for the day of judgment and destruction of the ungodly.

Ok, in verse 3 we are warned that in the last days, scoffers will come.  And what will the scoffers be doing?  They will be scoffing.  I am certain I have never called anybody a scoffer, it just sounds funny.  Robitussen Scoff Medicine.  I’d use ridiculing, making fun of… I guess my vocabulary is more limited.  You can scoff at me if you wish.

These scoffers are essentially saying that Jesus isn’t coming.  There’s no evidence.  The world today is the same as it was yesterday and will be the same tomorrow.  God doesn’t change the world, it’s been this way ever since He created it.  The second coming of Jesus can’t be possible because that would be a big change in the way God treats the world.

Peter responds that the scoffers are deliberately misleading.  God has intervened in the history of the world and made major changes.  The first major change was creation itself.  What was the world before God created it?  It was nothing, a void.  Then God spoke, and the universe was created.

Since then, God made another change at the time of Noah.  He flooded the earth to remove the unrighteousness.  Destroyed every living creature except those rescued in the ark.  Afterward, you may recall, God put a rainbow in the sky as a promise to Noah that He would never again destroy the world by water.   But He will destroy it by fire.  In Psalm 50:3, David said,

Our God comes

    and will not be silent;

a fire devours before him,

    and around him a tempest rages.

He summons the heavens above,

    and the earth, that he may judge his people:

“Gather to me this consecrated people,

    who made a covenant with me by sacrifice.”

And the heavens proclaim his righteousness,

    for he is a God of justice.

So not only are the scoffers wrong, but they know they’re wrong.  God has indeed judged the world before, and He will judge the world again.  And to the true Christians listening to Peter, don’t believe the scoffers.  Resist the call of the scoffers to party like it’s 1999, and rest instead on truth.

And what is the truth?  The truth is that Jesus will come again.  Peter’s writings are an introduction to eschatology, which is the study of the end of time, a study of the end of the world.  Christian eschatology is the study of the destiny of humankind as revealed by the bible, including death and the afterlife, Heaven and Hell, the Second Coming of Jesus, the Resurrection of the Dead, the Rapture, the Tribulation, Millennialism, the end of the world, the Last Judgment, and the New Heaven and New Earth of the World to Come.

The word eschatology comes from two unpronounceable Greek words eschatos (ἔσχατος) which means “last,” and logy (λογία), which means “the study of.”  They’re even harder to write down.  It’s like Greek to me.

Before the resurrection of Jesus, there were two main Jewish viewpoints on what happens to people after death.  The Sadducees recognized only the Torah, which are the first five books of the Old Testament.  According to the historian Josephus, the Sadducees believed that the soul is not immortal; there is no afterlife, and there are no rewards or penalties after death.  One just ceased to be.

This was a major point of contention with the Pharisees, who accepted not only the Torah, but also the Oral Law which eventually became the Mishna and the Talmud.  The Pharisees accepted, for instance, the Book of Daniel, and in Daniel 12:2 it says, “Multitudes who sleep in the dust of the earth will awake: some to everlasting life, others to shame and everlasting contempt.”

Even today, not all Christians have the same beliefs in the afterlife.  Seventh Day Adventists teach that upon death, the soul sleeps and is reawakened at the Resurrection.  Catholics teach that one enters into heaven either immediately or through a purification known as Purgatory, or immediately into Hell.  Most Protestants believe that Christ removed all obstacles and there is nothing we can add or take away, Christ paid for all of our sins and we enter directly into the presence of God after death.  Regardless, Peter emphasizes that there will indeed come a day of judgment and destruction of the ungodly.  Even though scoffers may ridicule them and party like there’s no tomorrow, Christians can be confident in Jesus’ return.  And today, Christians are still surrounded by the ungodly, by partiers, by pagans and New Age type beliefs.  When is this day of judgment going to come?  What is God waiting for?

       III.      Be Aware and Behave, 2 Peter 3:8-13

I’m glad you asked that, because Peter addresses that in the next few verses.  In 2 Peter 3:8-13,

But do not forget this one thing, dear friends: With the Lord a day is like a thousand years, and a thousand years are like a day.  The Lord is not slow in keeping his promise, as some understand slowness.  Instead he is patient with you, not wanting anyone to perish, but everyone to come to repentance.

 

But the day of the Lord will come like a thief.  The heavens will disappear with a roar; the elements will be destroyed by fire, and the earth and everything done in it will be laid bare.

 

Since everything will be destroyed in this way, what kind of people ought you to be?  You ought to live holy and godly lives as you look forward to the day of God and speed its coming. That day will bring about the destruction of the heavens by fire, and the elements will melt in the heat.  But in keeping with his promise we are looking forward to a new heaven and a new earth, where righteousness dwells.

We like the idea that God judges the guilty, as long as it’s other people he’s judging.  We’re less enthused about God judging us, and we know we’re not innocent people.  Thankfully, we have a Savior.  Since we’re saved, we should have no fear of the Day of the Lord.  So what is God waiting on?  We’re surrounded ungodly everywhere we turn.

The answer is found in God’s unfailing love.  God’s love begins with the very first definition of love found in 1 Corinthians 13:4.  Love is patient, love is kind.  God so loved the world that He gave his only begotten son.  God made man in His image.  And God withholds the Judgment of the Day of the Lord so that no one will perish.

Remember Abraham trying to bargain with God not to destroy Sodom?  The Lord said that their sin was so severe that He was going to destroy Sodom.  Abraham said, “Will you kill the righteous with the wicked?”  God said to Abraham, “If I can find 50 righteous people in the entire city of Sodom, I will spare them.”

Abraham started dealing.  “How about forty-five?  Thirty’s a good number.  Twenty is even better.  How do you feel about only ten righteous people?”  But when Abraham arrived in Sodom, all he found was wickedness.  He couldn’t find even 10 righteous people.  It was only then that God destroyed Sodom.

And how about the story of Noah and the Flood?  God saved Noah and his righteous family, then sent a flood to wash the world of its wickedness.  Afterward, Noah plants a vineyard, gets drunk, and passes out naked.  And he was the righteous one.  Can you even imagine the wickedness that was washed away?

Eventually, God’s perfect love and patience will eventually be overcome by His perfect justice.  He cannot let evil prevail.  And on that day, we won’t have any warning.  The Day of the Lord will come like a thief.

Peter uses the phrase “Day of the Lord” which was an Old Testament phrase for the final judgment.  Isaiah used it, Isaiah 13:9 –

See, the day of the Lord is coming

    —a cruel day, with wrath and fierce anger—

to make the land desolate

    and destroy the sinners within it.

And in Joel 2,

Blow the trumpet in Zion;

    sound the alarm on my holy hill.

Let all who live in the land tremble,

    for the day of the Lord is coming.

And then again in Zephaniah 1:14  and Malachi 4:5.  But Amos 5:18-24 seems especially apropos, directed at the so-called religious who were not living righteously –

Woe to you who long

    for the day of the Lord!

Why do you long for the day of the Lord?

    That day will be darkness, not light.

It will be as though a man fled from a lion

    only to meet a bear,

as though he entered his house

    and rested his hand on the wall

    only to have a snake bite him.

Will not the day of the Lord be darkness, not light—

    pitch-dark, without a ray of brightness?

I hate, I despise your religious festivals;

    your assemblies are a stench to me.

Even though you bring me burnt offerings and grain offerings,

    I will not accept them.

Though you bring choice fellowship offerings,

    I will have no regard for them.

Away with the noise of your songs!

    I will not listen to the music of your harps.

But let justice roll on like a river,

    righteousness like a never-failing stream!

So for the non-righteous Jews, for the antinomians who abused their freedom in Christ, the Day of the Lord is the day God’s righteous anger punishes evil.

When will this happen?  Only God knows when this will be.  God created the universe, and one day He will bring it to an appropriate end.  Jesus told us this day would come (Matthew 24:14), that we should watch for the signs (Matthew 24:29-30), and the timing will be according to God (Matthew 24:36).  It’s been 2000 years since Jesus, and that seems like a long time, but God doesn’t exist in time the way we do.  God is outside of time, and “With the Lord a day is like a thousand years, and a thousand years are like a day .”

We’re aware this day is coming.  The Rapture, the Great Tribulation, the Book of Revelation describes it in great detail.  So what do we do in the meantime?   We live with the expectancy that this day could come at any time.  Peter tells us to live holy and godly lives.  Why is that important?

I think first of all, living a holy life enables the Holy Spirit to work within us.  We’re here, each and every one of us, for a purpose that only we can fulfill.  When we live in the Spirit, we’re attuned to God’s direction; it’s easier to obey because it’s easier to listen.  We find it easier to understand that it’s not happiness that God wants from us, but righteousness.  But when we seek first His righteousness, then all these things, including happiness, will be given unto us.  Living a holy life demonstrates the Spirit lives within us.

And when the Spirit lives within us, then we demonstrate to others the spirit lives within us.  We demonstrate that righteous living brings godly blessings; we exhibit the fruits of the Spirit of love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness and self-control.  And we do this to draw others to Christ, because God does not want anyone to perish, but for everyone to come to repentance.

         IV.      Work and Watch Out, 2 Peter 3:14-18

While waiting for the Day of the Lord, we must work at being a pure people, guarding against erroneous ideas.  In the last part of 2 Peter 3, he says,

So then, dear friends, since you are looking forward to this, make every effort to be found spotless, blameless and at peace with him.  Bear in mind that our Lord’s patience means salvation, just as our dear brother Paul also wrote you with the wisdom that God gave him.  He writes the same way in all his letters, speaking in them of these matters.  His letters contain some things that are hard to understand, which ignorant and unstable people distort, as they do the other Scriptures, to their own destruction.

 

Therefore, dear friends, since you have been forewarned, be on your guard so that you may not be carried away by the error of the lawless and fall from your secure position.  But grow in the grace and knowledge of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. To him be glory both now and forever! Amen.

These scoffers and false teachers will be with us to the end of the age.  Our best defense is a good offense.  And the best offense against false teaching and antinomianism is to continually seek God’s will.  When we read the bible, we read first-hand how God treats his people, how God expresses His love for us, and what thoughts, words, and actions please Him.

Is it possible to live a spotless, blameless life?  Of course not, but that’s not what Peter says.  He says, “make every effort.”  Of course we’re going to make mistakes, we’ll take the blame for something.  We won’t be spotless, we’ll get spots.  But that’s ok.  It’s because we are fallible that we also know we need a Savior.  We’re not perfect; that’s too high of a bar for us.  But if we make every effort, we can be at peace because we know the Lord is pleased at our righteousness.

Sometimes we stumble here – somehow thinking this obedience is required to earn our salvation.  That is absolutely false – we cannot earn our salvation.  If we think we must somehow earn our salvation, we start to travel down the road of legalism.

No, we obey the Lord because it pleases Him.  It’s our love returned to God.  In 1 John 2, the author says,

My little children, I am writing these things to you so that you may not sin. And if anyone sins, we have an Advocate with the Father, Jesus Christ the righteous;  and He Himself is the satisfaction for our sins; and not for ours only, but also for those of the whole world.

 

By this we know that we have come to know Him, if we keep His commandments.  The one who says, “I have come to know Him,” and does not keep His commandments, is a liar, and the truth is not in him;  but whoever keeps His word, in him the love of God has truly been perfected. By this we know that we are in Him: the one who says he abides in Him ought himself to walk in the same manner as He walked.

The reason we read the bible?  To grow in the grace and knowledge of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ.   Because we cannot keep His word if we do not know His word.  Because we cannot resist false teaching unless we know what the truth is.  We must be on our guard, because our enemy prowls around like a roaring lion looking for someone to devour.  Christ will come again, and when He does, we want to be safe and secure in His arms.

            V.      Conclusion

What have we learned today?  We’ve learned that there are big words like antinomianism we’ve never heard of before.  And we’ve learned that Greek is a really hard language.

But we’ve also learned that we can have faith that Jesus will come again.  He’s prepared a place for us, and someday He will take us there.  We learned that the secular world around us will make fun of us, scoff at us for these beliefs, but they do not know the Lord.  Our Lord is full of perfect love and patience, but there will come a day where the Lord’s perfect justice will rule, and the unrighteous will be destroyed by fire.  We don’t know when that will be, a day or a thousand years, but we know that day is coming.  And while we wait, we are to strengthen ourselves with knowledge of His Word and obeying the Lord’s will, not out of fear or obligation, but because we love the one who first loved us.

And then we will spend an eternity in the presence of the One who loves us.  That’s something good to hope for.

To God be the glory.  Amen.