The Fall of Man

  I.      Introduction

As you may have noticed, my bible is entirely electronic.  I have a traditional paper study bible, and over the years, I’ve highlighted all the significant passages.  Every word of the book is highlighted.

There are have been, for my entire life, horrible stories in the news.  Mass murderers, earthquakes, shootings.  Recently there have been stories of 500,000 refugees fleeing from Middle East countries to Europe, with predictions of up to 35 million people.  And I’m not convinced it’s entirely a refugee situation, as ISIS flags have been seen among the groups and imams saying that the refugees should breed with the Europeans in order to conquer those countries for Islam.

If God is all powerful and all good, why does he let terrible things like this?  Why doesn’t He stop it?  Nonbelievers struggle with this more than believers do, I think.  God could have created robots to be good all the time.  But is that really free will?  God created us to love him voluntarily.  And along with the freedom to love Him comes the freedom not to love Him.

As we’ve studied recently in Revelation, we know that the entire bible points to Jesus as the redeemer of mankind.  Regardless of the problem, Jesus is the solution.  Today we’re going to talk about the source of all the problems.   William Griffith Thomas, a theologian in the early 1900’s, said about Genesis 3, “This chapter is the pivot on which the whole bible turns.”  Open your bible to the cause of all of our problems in Genesis Chapter 3.Slide2

II.      The Sham, Genesis 3:1-5

While this is a familiar story, let’s study it carefully today for additional insights.  Let’s begin with Genesis 3:1-5,

Now the serpent was more crafty than any of the wild animals the Lord God had made. He said to the woman, “Did God really say, ‘You must not eat from any tree in the garden’?”

The woman said to the serpent, “We may eat fruit from the trees in the garden, but God did say, ‘You must not eat fruit from the tree that is in the middle of the garden, and you must not touch it, or you will die.’”

“You will not certainly die,” the serpent said to the woman.  “For God knows that when you eat from it your eyes will be opened, and you will be like God, knowing good and evil.”

The serpent is not identified here by name, so let’s identify him.  Who is the serpent?  Coincidentally, the last lesson I taught was from Revelation 12, which in Revelation 12:9 says,

The great dragon was hurled down (out of heaven) – that ancient serpent called the devil, or Satan, who leads the whole world astray. He was hurled to the earth, and his angels with him.

Slide4

The serpent is introduced as a created being and as one who spoke against the word of God.  We know that when God creates something, it is good and it is perfect.  So where did the serpent come from?  There are two accounts that talk about the origin of Satan, in Ezekiel 28 and Isaiah 14.  Both of these verses talk about how beautiful and pure Satan was at the beginning of Creation.  Satan was so beautiful that he believed that he himself was God.  Pride, self-generated pride, was Satan’s downfall, worshiping God’s creation instead of worshiping the Creator.

So here is the serpent, saying crafty things to Eve.  And I’m going to call her “Eve,” even though that’s not her name yet.  In the previous chapter, Adam says, “She shall be called ‘woman’ because she was taken out of man.”  It just sounds funny to me to just keep calling her “woman.”

There is a new Disney Movie coming out next year, and I happened to see the trailer for it.  It’s a live action remake of “Jungle Book” and here’s an edited clip that I think is illustrative:

Satan’s first strategy is to get Eve to question the very word of God by misrepresenting what God said.  Satan asks Eve, “Did God really say, ‘You must not eat from any tree in the garden’?”  But that’s not what God said to Adam.  God said to Adam in Genesis 2:16-17,

And the Lord God commanded the man, “You are free to eat from any tree in the garden; but you must not eat from the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, for when you eat from it you will certainly die.”

Notice how the Evil One focused on the negative.  “God is being mean to you, telling you what’s not allowed.  There are so many rules for you.  You deserve to have whatever you want.”  God’s message was generous, gracious, permissive, “You may eat from *any* tree except the ones that may harm you.”

Notice also how Satan talked to the woman instead of the man.  Some studies make a big deal out of how God provided the instructions to the man, how it was his job to protect the woman, and while that may be true, I want to focus instead on how Adam had received the knowledge first hand, and Eve relied on what somebody told her God said.  Adam talked to God, but Eve had talked to Adam.  It’s important in our spiritual life that we are communicating directly to God through His Word and through prayer.  Going to church and listening to Dr. Young has tremendous benefits and is good, but it cannot replace personal study.  We want to be able to respond to any challenge with, “The bible says…”, not “my pastor says…”.  In this case, Eve may have found it easier to ignore God’s commands because she didn’t hear it firsthand.

Eve’s response to the serpent reveals a lot of subtle shifts.  While God said, “You are free to eat from any tree,” Eve phrases it defensively, “We may eat fruit from the trees.”  God doesn’t sound so generous the way Eve phrased it.

Eve also overstated how restrictive God had been with her.  Eve says that Gold told Adam, “You must not eat fruit from the tree that is in the middle of the garden, and you must not touch it.”  God didn’t say anything about not touching it.  Probably not a good idea to touch it, but God didn’t prohibit them from touching it, just from eating from it.

God’s Word is precisely and absolutely true.  Satan twists God’s word to get Even to question what God says.  In verse 4, the serpent says, “You won’t die.”  This is a direct contradiction to what God said.  This is the very first heresy in the bible, that sin is not punishable by death.  Romans 6:23 states it clearly, “For the wages of sin is death…” We can still hear this heresy today.  How can a loving God send people to Hell?  God wants us to enjoy life, so you should do whatever you want.  It doesn’t matter how destructive it is to your lives and the lives of those around you as long as you are enjoying yourself.

Satan goes on to say in verse 5, “For God knows that when you eat from it your eyes will be opened, and you will be like God, knowing good and evil.”  Listen to how mean God is.  Do you want to spend the rest of your life with eyes closed, or do you want to be like God?  Satan tells us that God is restrictive, God won’t punish sin, God is looking out for himself.  Genesis 1 and 2 tells us that God has provided everything necessary for the good of man, and that’s God’s true motives are looking out for man’s best interests, but Satan’s half-lies and half-truths says that God is just looking out for his own interests by withholding the best parts of the garden unfairly.

The scam is complete.

III.      The Shame, Genesis 3:6-7

Eve, tempted by the serpent, now justifies her sins.  Verses 6,

When the woman saw that the fruit of the tree was good for food and pleasing to the eye, and also desirable for gaining wisdom, she took some and ate it.

God has given Eve desires that are in line with His creation.  It is good to be satisfied with food that God has provided.  It is good to appreciate God’s beautiful creation, things that are pleasing to the eye.  It is good to gain in knowledge and wisdom.  But the things of this world will cause us to stumble if we do not satisfy them in a way that pleases the Lord.  It’s like Eve is saying to herself, “God wants me to be happy, and these things will make me happy.  So even though God says ‘no,’ I’m going to do them anyway because I know what is best for me.”

But this justification isn’t in line with God’s word.  It say the tree was good for food.  But was there other fruit in the garden that was good for food?  Of course there was, and God said they could eat from any of it.  Was there anything else in the garden that was pleasing to the eye?  Are you kidding?  They were in the Garden of Eden, *everything* was pleasing to the eye.  God had provided for everything man and woman needed.  But Eve was deceived, and believed by sight – not by faith – that she should have this forbidden fruit.  She deserves this forbidden fruit, and it’s not fair that God should withhold it from her.  How does she know God is telling the truth unless she experiences the fruit for herself?

Failure to appreciate God’s goodness leads to distrust of His goodness.  Distrust leads to dissatisfaction, dissatisfaction leads to disobedience.  Admiring the beautiful fruit was not a sin.  Even touching it was not a sin.  But disobeying God by eating of the fruit led to spiritual death.

Eve has been deceived by the serpent that this is God’s desire for her.

Then the verse goes on to say,

She also gave some to her husband, who was with her, and he ate it.

If Eve was deceived, Adam’s response was rebellion.  Adam knew firsthand that God had withheld the fruit of this tree from him.  Adam was not deceived; Adam sinned with understanding.  Man wants to be independent, to be in control of our own destiny, to make decisions for ourselves.

I spoke to someone at work this week about some of our past work experiences; he told me about working at a nuclear facility.  The US government decided that everyone that had been working there less than 5 years had to take a psychological profile, and since he had only been there 4, he had to take the test.  There were a lot of yes/no responses, and if you didn’t get them all right, you had to see the psychologist and explain your response.  The question that got him in trouble was, “Someone is in control of my life, true or false.”

He answered “true.”  And in my head, I’m also thinking “true.”  God is in control of my life, and He is most definitely someone.  My colleague’s response was “true” for a different reason.  He was in control of his own life, and he was someone.

Of course, it dawned on me that both his response and my response would probably land us on the psychiatrist’s couch.

I think this independence, to say to God, “You’re not the boss of me,” is pride, pure and simple.  If I am my own boss, then nobody else can tell me what to do, including God.  To take a step further, pride will lead me down a path that I can tell God who He is and what He can do.  God can’t tell me what the truth is about sexual immorality, about gluttony, and judgmentalism.  I know what is best for me.  I am worshipping God’s creation, me, instead of worshipping the awesome powerful God who created me.  It’s the same pride that had Satan cast out of heaven.

When Adam’s rebellion led him to sin against God, the entire human race from that moment on fell.  The apostle Paul makes this clear in Romans 5:12,

Therefore, just as sin entered the world through one man, and death through sin, and in this way death came to all people, because all sinned.

Because of this sin, in verse 7 it says,

Then the eyes of both of them were opened, and they realized they were naked; so they sewed fig leaves together and made coverings for themselves.

Knowledge of good and evil necessarily requires us to have knowledge of evil.  I was not a particularly rebellious kid, I made good grades in school, I didn’t get into much trouble with the law.  My police record is clean, though Mr. McIntyre in 5th grade said he would be making notes in my permanent record.  But in my 30’s I got a wild streak that led to indiscretions, and let’s just say I’m glad that iPhone cameras were not available back then.

My point is that during this wild period, I saw man’s depravity up close, in those around me and in myself.  My phrase for that period in my life can be summed up by the phrase, “what was once seen cannot be unseen.”  As I work out my salvation with fear and trembling, I long for days of innocence where there were some things I was happy I didn’t know.  Have you ever felt the same way, perhaps after watching a movie or reading a news article about some horrific crime?  I can tell you that in my case, I am not edified or built up for God’s purpose.

Adam and Eve surely felt the same.  Before, they freely walked in God’s garden; after the fall, they covered themselves in leaves and shame.

IV.      The Blame, Genesis 3:8-13

Let’s continue with verses 8-13,

Then the man and his wife heard the sound of the Lord God as he was walking in the garden in the cool of the day, and they hid from the Lord God among the trees of the garden.  But the Lord God called to the man, “Where are you?”

He answered, “I heard you in the garden, and I was afraid because I was naked; so I hid.”

And he said, “Who told you that you were naked? Have you eaten from the tree that I commanded you not to eat from?”

The man said, “The woman you put here with me—she gave me some fruit from the tree, and I ate it.”

Then the Lord God said to the woman, “What is this you have done?”

The woman said, “The serpent deceived me, and I ate.”

In verse 7, they sewed fig leaves together to cover their nakedness, but I’m guessing that fig leaves aren’t a very efficient form of covering because they’re still naked.  Not only is there shame, but now there is also guilt.  And with guilt, we hide from the Lord.  Have you ever tried to sin while reading the bible?  We all have temptations we are dealing with, and we all fall short of God’s glory, but for just a second, think of your own personal struggle, and when you knowing did something shameful.  Were you hiding from God at that time, like Adam?  Do you think that when God asks, “Where are you?” that He doesn’t already know the answer?

God gave Adam and Eve a chance to confess their sins, but instead they get tripped up by admitting they knew they were naked.  Busted, now they know that God knows they’ve eaten the forbidden fruit.  But rather than confess, the rationalizations and the finger pointing begins.

Adam’s first response it to blame both Eve *and* God.  “The woman, who *you* put here, gave the fruit to me.  I’d have never sinned if you hadn’t have given me a woman.”  And the woman blamed it on the serpent.  And the serpent, well, he didn’t have a leg to stand on.

Adam accused both the woman and God for his transgressions.  This is the first accusation in the bible, and it came immediately after the serpent appeared in the Garden.  Revelation 12:10 says that Satan is the accuser of all Christians, accusing us before our God day and night.  Accusation, lies, name calling, shifting blame, even if it is true, comes from Satan.

  V.      The Fall, Genesis 3:14-21

God is holy, and His holiness demands that all sin and evil must be eliminated.  There are repercussions for sin.  Psalm 46:6-7 says,

Your throne, O God, will last for ever and ever;

    a scepter of justice will be the scepter of your kingdom.

You love righteousness and hate wickedness

In the account of Creation, God provided 3 blessings.  In Genesis 1;22, God blessed the great creatures of the sea and the air and told them to be fruitful and multiply.  And in Genesis 1:28 after creating man and woman, he blessed them and told them to be fruitful and multiply.  And in 2:3, God rested on the 7th day, blessed it and made it holy.

As the result of the fall, though, there are now 3 curses.  The first curse is given to the serpent in verses 14-15,

So the Lord God said to the serpent, “Because you have done this,

“Cursed are you above all livestock

    and all wild animals!

You will crawl on your belly

    and you will eat dust

    all the days of your life.

And I will put enmity

    between you and the woman,

    and between your offspring and hers;

he will crush your head,

    and you will strike his heel.”

The serpent will suffer physical changes and lifestyle changes, crawling in the dust for the remainder of its days.  I know some people keep snakes as pets, and I personally don’t have a problem holding one of touching one, but I can’t say I’d ever want to cuddle up with one.  They’re not exactly lovable creatures, and I’m sure a large part of that is the result of the serpent’s deception.  But let’s look at the second half of this.  Some commentaries see nothing more than ongoing hatred between man and snakes.  But the phrasing indicates more than this is going on – it extends to the offspring of the woman and the offspring of the serpent.

The offspring of the serpent could refer to the one who possessed the serpent, Satan, the Evil One.  And the offspring of the woman, literally “her seed” may refer to the virgin birth of Jesus since the verse does not say “their seed.”  This verse contains the masculine, third-person singular “he” in the phrase “he will crush your head.”  A seed of the woman will crush the head (i.e. provide a fatal blow), not to the descendants of the serpent (we don’t expect all snakes to be killed by mankind), but by the one who started all of this, Satan himself.

This is the first prophetic promise that God already knows the problem created by man’s sin, but has already begin a plan to redeem mankind from his sin.   In Romans 16:20, Paul writes that the God of Peace will soon crush Satan under your feet.  There is a continual struggle of each generation for the good to overcome the evil while the evil tries to overcome the good.  Until our Redeemer, the Messiah, the Seed of the Woman, finally defeats Satan and in Revelation 20:10 throws Satan in the lake of burning sulfur.

We’ll get to more of this in a moment, but let’s discuss the other two curses first.

The second curse belongs to the woman –

To the woman he said,

 “I will make your pains in childbearing very severe;

    with painful labor you will give birth to children.

Your desire will be for your husband,

    and he will rule over you.”

The relationship between the wife and her husband were changed forever.  Judgement fell on Eve and her offspring in what was uniquely hers as a woman.  While death has entered the world, life will continue, but the pain of childbirth will be a continuing reminder of Eve’s role in bring the fall to all mankind.

Also, her desire will be for her husband, and he will rule over her.  There are several possible meanings here, but the one that seems true to me and is in line with the New Testament is that wife will seek to dominate the relationship and will no longer intuitively submit to her husband as his “helper.”

The third curse belongs to Adam, all mankind, and to the earth –

To Adam he said, “Because you listened to your wife and ate fruit from the tree about which I commanded you, ‘You must not eat from it,’

 “Cursed is the ground because of you;

    through painful toil you will eat food from it

    all the days of your life.

It will produce thorns and thistles for you,

    and you will eat the plants of the field.

By the sweat of your brow

    you will eat your food

until you return to the ground,

    since from it you were taken;

for dust you are

    and to dust you will return.”

While Eve was deceived, Adam rebelled, and it is this sin of pride and rebellion that draws the most severe discipline.  No longer will Adam and his wife be able to stroll through the garden and eat of the many fruits, but now Adam will have to work his entire life.  The world is no longer beautiful and pristine, but now tainted by sin.  The world itself has fallen.  Romans 8:20-22 puts it this way,

For the creation was subjected to frustration, not by its own choice, but by the will of the one who subjected it, in hope that the creation itself will be liberated from its bondage to decay and brought into the freedom and glory of the children of God.  We know that the whole creation has been groaning as in the pains of childbirth right up to the present time.

The world is in bondage to decay and death, just as all man, through the sin of one man, is in bondage to decay and death.  I want to point out a subtle change in the words of scripture – Genesis 1:26 says, “Let us make man in our image, in our likeness.”  But after the fall, Adam and Eve have sons Cain, Abel, and Seth.  Look at how Genesis 5 begins –

This is the written account of Adam’s family line.  

When God created mankind, he made them in the likeness of God.  He created them male and female and blessed them. And he named them “Mankind” when they were created.

When Adam had lived 130 years, he had a son in his own likeness, in his own image; and he named him Seth.

While we are all made in God’s image, we also carry the genetics of sin with us.  Seth was not just made in God’s image; now the scripture say Seth was made in Adam’s image.  God’s perfect image has been corrupted and that corrupted images and likeness were passed along to the descendants of Adam.  Nobody teaches us to sin.  Because of our corrupted nature, we know all too well how to sin on our own.  We do not teach our children to lie, somehow they already now.  We have to teach them to tell the truth.  The sinful worldly self comes naturally.  The self that longs to be good must be trained and taught.

We long for the day we can again has a relationship with our Father in Heaven without the stain of sin separating us.  But on our own, we have no solution, we have to strategy of success, we have no hope.  How do we live when we are banished from Paradise with our Father?   Let’s look at the rest of Genesis 3 and see if there is a hint of the hope yet to come.

Adam named his wife Eve, because she would become the mother of all the living.

 The Lord God made garments of skin for Adam and his wife and clothed them.  And the Lord God said, “The man has now become like one of us, knowing good and evil. He must not be allowed to reach out his hand and take also from the tree of life and eat, and live forever.”  So the Lord God banished him from the Garden of Eden to work the ground from which he had been taken.  After he drove the man out, he placed on the east side of the Garden of Eden cherubim and a flaming sword flashing back and forth to guard the way to the tree of life.

“The man has become like one of us, knowing good and evil.”  God in His omniscience, has all knowledge of good and evil, and he didn’t have to commit evil.  Man committed a sin to learn this knowledge.  It’s like a doctor and a patient diagnosing an illness.  Our understanding of that illness is different.  Our understanding of good and evil is both like God’s understanding and unlike it.  Now man will seek to make decisions based on a poor understanding of good and evil, a problem that plagues all of us today.  God has perfect divine understanding of good and evil and He asks us to trust him.  Sometimes we do.  Most of the time we want to do it our own way.

And this sinful self must not be allowed to live forever.  An eternal, sinful life of separation from God would be, literally, a living hell.  But God’s grace provides a solution.  He allows us to die so that we may then live.

Notice how Adam and Eve’s fig leaves have been replaced with animal skins.  Because of their transgressions, an innocent life was shed for man.  This, too is a prelude for what is to come.  No matter what the sin, how rebellious and prideful our decisions are, God is willing to make whatever sacrifice is necessary so that we may have hope.

VI.      Conclusion

We all inherit a sinful nature from Adam and Eve, and we might think this is unfair to be blamed for something one man did thousands of years ago.  But we are not punished for Adam’s sins, we inherit his nature.  We each have our own sins.  We didn’t chose to have a sinful nature, but let’s be honest, we would have.  Adam was the perfect man, created by God, and placed him in the perfect environment, the Garden of Eden.  And every day, God walked with Adam in the cool of the day to instruct Adam and draw closer to him.  And even with this perfect man, perfect environment, perfect relationship, Adam still sinned.  Through Adam, death entered the world.  We are fooling ourselves if we think we could do better.  We choose our own sin.

But just as we choose our own sin, we also choose our salvation.  God has begun a sacrificial system where an innocent life may be sacrificed as an atonement for sin.  If we try to work off our debt by trying to be good, we will fail. Because of our sinful nature, we are no longer suitable sacrifices for our own sin.  We need a savior.  We need a suitable sacrifice for our sins. Earlier I read from Romans 6:23, but I only read the first half of it.  Here is the entire verse:

For the wages of sin is death, but the gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord.

For God so loved the world.  For God so loved you.  For God so loved me, that He gave his only begotten son, that whoever believes in Him shall not perish but have everlasting life.  And that is the one and only solution to the fall of man and our sin.  Jesus Christ.

To God be the glory.

Tower of Babel

Even though lunch today is at Fajita Flats, I brought along a suggestion from a restaurant I was recently visiting called La Place in Hengelo, The Netherlands. Here’s also a list of today’s specials; I can highly recommend the voorgerecht.

(Other handouts go here: the complete menu, shopping flyers, German newspaper, Dutch newspaper, French airport guide. If you’re reading this online, you’re out of luck.)

One of the toughest things about traveling is the language barrier between us and the country. It’s rewarding and exciting to travel outside of the touristy areas, but the further you get away, the more language becomes a problem.

About a year and a half ago, Diane accompanied me on a business trip to Europe, and one of the places we stayed at was a little French town of Honfluer in lower Normandy. It was quaint, a little fishing village of about 8000 people. Diane and I had just arrived in France earlier that day and driven in from Paris and were sitting down to our first meal. We chose a little outdoor café where we could watch the sights and the people and enjoy the sunshine. The waitress came by to drop off some menus and I asked, “English menus?” and she shook her head no. Diane and I stared at the words in French.

So, like a gentleman, I offered to order for Diane. When the waitress came back, I pointed at Diane and said, “She’ll have” and then pointed at the menu, “this, this, and this.” Then I pointed at me and said, “I’ll have that, that, and that.” The waitress wrote it down, smiled, and walked off.

Diane asked me what I had ordered. “For you, I ordered this this and this. For me, that that and that. Pay attention.” I had little idea what I had ordered. I recognized a few words from previous trips, so I was fairly certain I had ordered some sort of chicken with potatoes, but I may have ordered snails with motor oil.

Communication is very difficult when there is a language barrier. You know, I’ve discovered that, even when we all speak English, communication is difficult. We say one thing, our spouse hears another. Our spouse says one thing, we hear something else. Why is communication so difficult? Let’s turn to Genesis 11 and study the chapter on scrambled communication, The Tower of Babel. Genesis 11:1-9:

Now the whole world had one language and a common speech. As men moved eastward, they found a plain in Shinar and settled there. They said to each other, “Come, let’s make bricks and bake them thoroughly.” They used brick instead of stone, and tar for mortar. Then they said, “Come, let us build ourselves a city, with a tower that reaches to the heavens, so that we may make a name for ourselves and not be scattered over the face of the whole earth.”

But the LORD came down to see the city and the tower that the men were building. The LORD said, “If as one people speaking the same language they have begun to do this, then nothing they plan to do will be impossible for them. Come, let us go down and confuse their language so they will not understand each other.”

So the LORD scattered them from there over all the earth, and they stopped building the city. That is why it was called Babel — because there the LORD confused the language of the whole world. From there the LORD scattered them over the face of the whole earth.

I had to look up the pronunciation since I’ve heard it pronounced “babble” and “BAY-bell.” Turns out the correct pronunciation is “buh-BELL.”

Verse 1, “Now the whole world had one language and a common speech.” When did this take place? Some scholars look back a chapter at Genesis 10 verse 5, 20, and 31 which tell us that Noah’s offspring had their own language. For instance, in Genesis 10:5 it says, “From these the maritime peoples spread out into their territories by their clans within their nations, each with its own language.” So it seems reasonable that the building of the tower took place soon after the flood and before Noah’s offspring had completely left to populate the earth. This makes sense; in Genesis 9:7 as God was placing His rainbow in the sky, God told Noah, “As for you, be fruitful and increase in number; multiply on the earth and increase upon it.” And Genesis 10 tells us that Noah had a son named Ham who had a son named Cush who had a son named Nimrod and that Nimrod was a mighty hunter before the LORD, and Genesis 10:10 says Nimrod founded Babylon in the plain of Shinar. Instead of these sons of Noah spreading out and populating the earth, though, men thought they knew better than God. Instead of spreading out, they found a plain in Shinar and settled there. Huh. Direct disobedience to what God told them to do. Of course, *we* would never do that, would we?

Genesis 11:3-4 says,

They said to each other, “Come, let’s make bricks and bake them thoroughly.” They used brick instead of stone, and tar for mortar. Then they said, “Come, let us build ourselves a city, with a tower that reaches to the heavens, so that we may make a name for ourselves and not be scattered over the face of the whole earth.”

Where’s God in this decision? Let us make bricks, let us build ourselves a city, so that *we may make a name for ourselves* and not be scattered over the face of the whole earth. We see man deciding that he knows better than God. When we go against God’s instruction, it is always evil. It is always sin. It is the same sort of sin that has tempted man since the Garden of Eden. We know better than God what we need. We know better than God what’s important. So here we see Godly men, mighty hunters before the LORD, giving way to their own desires again.

The evil in this case is in numbers; the safety in numbers is a flawed concept when compared to being in the safety of God, but these men wanted to make a name for themselves. Perhaps with the flood still fresh in their minds, they wanted to build a tower of safety. Instead of trusting God’s rainbow, they will trust themselves. This is the beginning of secular humanism, thousands of years before we gave it a name. Safety in numbers does not provide safety in the world. Safety in the world is obtained by trusting in God. Correct worship of God is in trust and obedience in Him.

This secular humanism, trusting man instead of God, continues today. While we can blame our secular society for teaching to trust in man, in separation of church and state, it continues inside each and every one of us. We give lip service to trusting in God, but when we find some instruction from God in God’s Word that we don’t like, we trust ourselves first. Oh, I’m not going to do that, certainly God can’t mean that. Or, I know that God says that, but he doesn’t understand our difficult that is, so I’m going to do it my way. This secular humanism, this trusting in ourselves, leads to pride. If we’re going to trust ourselves, then we must promote ourselves until we are on equal footing with God. Or we must bring God down to our level so that we seem better than we are. These descendents of Nimrod are saying, “let us build a tower so that we may make a name for ourselves.” Trust in ourselves leads us to inflate our own egos. Let us not be fooled; we are not God. Making a name for ourselves is not God’s plan. Fellowship with our Lord and giving praise to God’s name is His plan.

Is God pleased by pride? Genesis 11:5-7,

But the LORD came down to see the city and the tower that the men were building. The LORD said, “If as one people speaking the same language they have begun to do this, then nothing they plan to do will be impossible for them. Come, let us go down and confuse their language so they will not understand each other.”

While men believed they were building a tower that reached to the heavens as a monument to themselves, from God’s perspective, this was a puny little project. Whatever they were trying to build for themselves, these people had no claim to greatness. When people begin to rely on people and we inflate our own egos and we begin to act like we are gods, nothing seems impossible. But look at our track record as people independent from God. Have we ended war? Have we ended poverty? Have we ended hunger? Have we ended sickness or disease or global warming or pollution or overpopulation or illegal immigration or child abuse or murder or stealing or anything else? Is there anything man has accomplished apart from God?

This puny tower did not threaten God’s sovereignty. This puny tower was only huge in the eyes of the people that created it. I don’t believe God took the building of the tower as a threat, but God did take the sin of pride that led to the building of the tower seriously. God’s plan was for man to spread out and populate the earth, and instead, man has staked a spot in the desert and is building a monument to himself. This is a step along the path to disobedience and the resulting consequences. Whenever we attempt to be our own God, God will confuse our plans. God already has a plan and doesn’t want us to make our own plans independent from Him. The common language of the people led to achievement, which led to prideful disobedience. They substituted their own purposes for God’s purposes.

Discussion questions –
If we believe we can accomplish anything, is that right or wrong? Why?
What things do people do today that show they trust themselves more than they trust God?

I think of how powerful and omniscient and holy God is, looking down at this pitiful little tower and seeing man placing their faith in their own accomplishments. How little it takes for us to develop pride in ourselves. Apart from Him, we can do nothing, but often we think we can do anything we want without repercussions. God could have easily toppled the tower, just given it a little tap and knocked it over. But I think we’d be like some sort of human ant colony, we’d start scurrying around and swarming and rebuilding the monument to ourselves. Instead of using brick instead of stone, and tar for mortar, we’d delude ourselves by upgrading the building material. We’d build towers out of steel and glass, skyscrapers reaching to the sky to demonstrate the power of man. It’s still all self-delusional accomplishments. It pales next to the creations of God.

God does something more amazing than knocking over an anthill; He confuses their language. While Nimrod and the people have this wonderful idea to band together to worship themselves, God effortlessly stops them. Nimrod’s idea to unite the world in one religion of secular humanity depended on effective communication. With the inability to communicate effectively disabled, Nimrod’s idea still gave birth to alternative worship, alternative man-made gods, that we still are dealing with today. Nimrod may have failed at creating a single unified counterfeit religion, but he still created the basic idea of a counterfeit religion. Even now, man’s belief in his own superiority leads to confusion, conflict, wars, and often based on counterfeit, man-made religion. All because man attempted to create a plan independent of God.

The sin of pride in man’s own accomplishment no doubt led to the first of God’s Ten Commandments, “Thou shalt have no other gods before me.” God acts here to prevent man from establishing a counterfeit, uniform worship that would disrupt God’s plan of redemption. By confusing their language, man could no longer find adequate safety in numbers. With communication problems, now they become suspicious of each other, sometimes angry at each other when communication is impossible. They had tried to band together to show they could unite in rebellion against God, but now, effortlessly, God made that impossible.

Lastly, in Genesis 11:8-9,

So the LORD scattered them from there over all the earth, and they stopped building the city. That is why it was called Babel — because there the LORD confused the language of the whole world. From there the LORD scattered them over the face of the whole earth.

It’s ironic; they find themselves doing God’s will, whether they want to or not. They wanted to proclaim themselves free of God, able to do their own will, but God scattered them all over the face of the earth. Where they once had freedom to go where they wanted to and fulfill the Lord’s command to populate the earth, now the Lord simply scattered them. In search of their own freedom, they now find themselves in slavery to their sin. The Lord is always in control and His will is always done. We can have the freedom to do it His way, or He will accomplish His will without us. God works out His plan through people who resist Him as well as people who obey Him. Nimrod and his followers discovered God’s control through His judgment. Ultimately, every human who rebels against the Lord also discovers the same thing. God is and always has been and always will be in control. We have the freedom to be in His will, but we do not have to freedom to override His will.

More discussion:
Why do people, even believers, sometimes resist God’s will and directions?
How does God accomplish His will anyway even if people resist Him?

So “bay-bell” or “babble” or “buh-bell” in the ancient Hebrew means “to confuse by mixing.” Where is the tower of Babel today? The plain of Shinar is today’s modern day Iraq, and Babel eventually became Babylon. Today, it’s an area of ruins about 60 miles south of Baghdad. It’s amazing that the defiance of God and the source of much of the world’s continuing confusion still emanates from the same place after all these centuries.

Is it God’s will that we cannot communicate with each other? No, God’s will here at the Tower of Babel ended man’s ability to unite together in defiance of God. Man is still in defiance of God, but there are dozens and dozens of man-made religions and are no longer united against the Lord. God’s will is that we are able to communicate His purpose. In Acts 2 as the Holy Spirit came upon men, it says “we heard them declaring the wonders of God in our own tongues!” When we unite behind God’s purpose, God can facilitate our communication. The first thing, though, before we communicate with each other, is to communicate with God. We read God’s Word so He speaks to us; we go to the Lord in prayer so we can speak to Him. How can we possibly know God’s will if we’re not in communication with Him? We should choose to talk to God and cooperate with Him first. I believe we’ll find our communication with each other is far, far better if we’re in communication with our heavenly father first.

As humanity spreads out across the earth, we see a small remnant that worships the one true God, and the rest of humanity abandoning God and worshiping itself or other false religions. And we can begin to see how God is going to take this mess that humanity makes and offer us a true relationship with Him. From Adam and Eve who sought to become their own gods and know right from wrong, God’s justice banned them from the Garden of Evil and the Tree of Life. We saw through Cain and Abel as humanity’s ability to sin further separated us from God as Cain killed Abel. The true worship of our Lord continued through Seth, the son of Adam, but by the time of Noah, the true worship of God was only alive in one man, and through the story of the ark, God’s grace was extended to Noah and his family and the human race was spared. And even with the flood, we see that man’s ability to try to make himself his own God continuing as Nimrod’s people attempt to build a tower, a monument, to their own secular power.

At the end of Genesis 11 in verse 10, we see a genealogy emerge. We know from Genesis 10 that Noah had 3 sons to continue the true worship of the Lord; Ham, Shem and Japheth. Ham fathered Cush, Cush fathered Nimrod. The apostasy of Nimrod led to the rise of the pride in humanity and the consequences of the Tower of Babel. But in another line from Noah, God’s true name is worshipped. Two years after the flood, Shem became the father of Asphaxad who fathered Shelah. Shelah fathered Eber who fathered Peleg. Peleg fathered Reu who fathered Serug. Serug fathered Nahor who fathered Terah who became the father of Abram. And in Abram the worship of God is being preserved.

We see a repeat of Noah; Abram alone is worshipping the one true God while the rest of the world, now a confusion of many languages. Will God repeat the flood? No, He made a covenant with Noah and sealed it with His rainbow. No, God will not destroy humanity with another flood. God has a new plan of redemption that He will establish, beginning with Abram. While Nimrod said, “Let us build a city,” through Abram God promises, “I will make of thee a great nation.” The nation that God will create through Abram shall identify the one true God to a world that has turned from Him. Nimrod, the mighty hunter whose name means “rebellion,” sought to make a city, a tower for themselves. God’s plan was to make a nation unto Him.

Our communication problem, even when we’re all speaking English, is a result of man’s pride so many centuries ago. God did not create us to create little monuments to ourselves. God created us to show His glory in a world that continually turns its back on Him. While His perfect judgment led to our multitude of languages, His Holy Spirit unifies us and gives us a singular purpose. We become one in the body with each other when we are in communication with He who created us. Let us seek Him and communicate with Him through prayer and worship and obedience, and we will find that we can communicate with each other far better than if we try to do it without Him.

Pride and the Lord God

We’re continuing our study of the minor prophets today with Obadiah. Obadiah. When I found out this week’s lesson was on Obadiah, my first obvious question was, “Who in the heck is Obadiah?” Isn’t he one of the Beverly Hillbillies? “Let me tell you ‘bout a story ‘bout a man named Obadiah.” Or is he the subject of that famous Beatle’s song, “O-bla-di, O-bla-dah, O-ba-di-a! Lala how the life goes on.”

Well, it turns out Obadiah isn’t either one of those two choices. Obadiah is the smallest book in the bible, a single chapter of 21 verses, probably a single page in your bible. But don’t let the small size fool you; God has a powerful message in this little book.

First, let’s look at the history. Who is Obadiah? The answer is, we really don’t really know. There are at least 12 people named Obadiah in the Old Testament, but none of them seem to be this particular Obadiah. “Obadiah” mean “servant of Jehovah,” and in Obadiah 1:1 it begins, “The vision of Obadiah. This is what the Sovereign Lord says about Edom.” Perhaps Obadiah’s anonymity in itself is meaningful; if we are a true humble servant of the Lord, then it doesn’t matter if we become famous and our identity is passed along through generations. Obadiah simply appears and announces the vision of God that he has received. Edom will be destroyed.

So who is this Edom? Let’s back up to Genesis 17 where God promises Abraham to make him the father of many nations. Abraham has to wait 4 chapters, all the way to Genesis 21 before Sarah bears him a son named Isaac. Three chapters later in Genesis 24, Isaac is all grown up and falls in love with Rebekah, and in Genesis 25, Rebekah has twin boys, Esau and Jacob. We are told these boys fought in their mother’s womb and they continued to fight their whole lives, from Genesis 25 to Genesis 33. You may remember that Esau sold his spiritual birthright to Jacob for a bowl of soup. While this doesn’t say much in favor of Jacob, it says a lot about Esau who would rather satisfy his hunger than obtain his birthright. Jacob eventually begins the nation of Israel; in Genesis 36, Esau begins the nation of Edom by defying the Lord and taking two wives. Esau was the father of the Edomites.

Edom and Israel never got along, even though they shared a common ancestry in Isaac. Edom makes another appearance in the book of Numbers. Moses is finally ready to lead the Israelites into the Promised Land, but they have to pass from the desert of Sinai through Edom to get there. Was Edom helpful? No, they were not. When Moses asks permission to pass through, Edom replies in Numbers 20:18, “You may not pass through here; if you try, we will march out and attack you with the sword.” Israel was forced to go around Edom.

Now, Israel spent some time defying the Lord for the rest of the Old Testament. God made incredible promises if only Israel will follow God’s laws and be faithful to the Lord. Israel was about as successful at that as, well, we are today. When Israel falls short, God punishes Israel. In 586 BC, Jerusalem is defeated by Nebuchadnezzar and the Jews are brought to Babylon in exile. Now, Edom is a large country to the south of Jerusalem, and they share a common ancestor with Israel. Do the Edomites help their sister country when Nebuchadnezzar attacks? No, they do not. They sit in their fortified cities on a hill, brag about how big and strong Edom is and how weak Israel is, and when the opportunity arises, the Edomites sweep in and loot whatever is left of Jerusalem. Not exactly the kind of neighbors you hope for in tough times.

In the book of Obadiah, the prophet tells Edom that the Lord is not amused. While Israel is being punished because they do not follow all of God’s laws, Edom isn’t following any of God’s laws. Edom feels they are invincible, powerful, and mighty. In Obadiah 1:3-4, the Lord says to Edom,

The pride of your heart has deceived you,
you who live in the clefts of the rocks
and make your home on the heights,
you who say to yourself,
‘Who can bring me down to the ground?’

Though you soar like the eagle
and make your nest among the stars,
from there I will bring you down,”
declares the LORD.

What was Edom’s great sin? Pride. Let’s read Obadiah 1:11-14 and see what Edom did instead of helping their neighbor:

You should not look down on your brother
in the day of his misfortune,
nor rejoice over the people of Judah
in the day of their destruction,
nor boast so much
in the day of their trouble.

You should not march through the gates of my people
in the day of their disaster,
nor look down on them in their calamity
in the day of their disaster,
nor seize their wealth
in the day of their disaster.

You should not wait at the crossroads
to cut down their fugitives,
nor hand over their survivors
in the day of their trouble.

Apparently Edom laughed when Jerusalem was in trouble. Not only that, but they helped themselves to the plunder, and when they found Jews fleeing the city, the Edomites killed them or handed them over to Nebuchadnezzar’s army. Sort of like coming across an old lady trying to cross the street who is obviously bewildered and confused. Edom pushes the old lady into traffic and steals her handbag. And all of this behavior and attitude rooted is in the pride of Edom.

Before I continue, I want to ask a couple of questions about the most offensive sins. What is the most offensive sin to you personally? Either when you commit a sin, or when somebody else commits a sin in your presence. Murder? Adultery? What’s another really offensive sin?

Here’s 3 examples. Imagine you see a Sunday school teacher at a wet t-shirt contest. Imagine you read about a church deacon that was arrested for breaking into a convenience store. Imagine a prayer warrior proud of the number of people he’s led to Christ.

That last one doesn’t seem so terrible, does it? Our human perception doesn’t rate “pride” very high on the scale of serious sins, but God’s perspective is not the same as ours. In God’s sight, pride is worse that stealing. It’s worse than drunkenness. Imagine saying, “He’s a good man but proud.” Doesn’t sound so bad, does it? Now imagine saying, “He’s a good man but a thief.” Pride is the sin of sins, and all the more devious because the nature of pride is so hard to recognize in ourselves. We’ve probably heard Proverbs 16:18 before that says, “Pride goes … before a fall.” We’re less familiar with Proverbs 16:5, “The Lord detests the proud of heart,” and Proverbs 6:16-17 that basically says God hates pride.

What is pride? Simply put, it’s a belief in one’s own importance and superiority. It’s a reliance on self instead of God. It is the attitude of a life that declares an ability to live without God. Pride says we don’t need God. Pride, therefore, is the root of unbelief, and that’s why pride is the sin of sins. In Obadiah, we can see how the pride of Edom led to other sins. In verse 10, pride led to violence against Israel. Verse 11, Edom “stood aloof” while Israel was being destroyed. This is the sin of omission; it’s the sin of saying, “Don’t get involved.” In verse 12, Edom looks down on Israel and rejoices over Israel’s troubles. To feel superior to Israel, Edom boasted and rejoiced over Israel’s troubles. Feeling good because somebody else is suffering misfortune is a symptom of pride, and if we put them down, it is a symptom of pride.

Verse 13, Edom looted Israel during their disaster. After a disaster; a tornado, a hurricane, a flood, what’s the appropriate Christian response: help or loot the victims? Verse 14, pride leads to betrayal. As the Jewish survivors fled, Edom helped the enemy kill the Jews. Pride can lead us to stab another in the back just to improve our own situation.

That’s why pride is the sin of sins. By itself, pride doesn’t seem so bad to us. God knows, though, that pride is a reliance and a dependence on one’s self instead of relying on God and will lead to a multitude of other sins. Human pride denies God the honor due Him. Human pride rejects the need for our Savior.

In Matthew 11:25-26, Jesus tells us that pride makes us “know-it-alls” and that it pleases God to hide things from know-it-alls. He says, “At that time Jesus said, “I praise you, Father, Lord of heaven and earth, because you have hidden these things from the wise and learned, and revealed them to little children. Yes, Father, for this was your good pleasure.”

When we are self-reliant and proud, we are often not even aware of it. We tell ourselves we are being obedient to the Lord while living a disobedient life. We become a “practical atheist” – one who attends church and bible study and openly confesses Jesus as lord – but then lives everyday as though God does not exist. And we all do that, each and every one of us, every time we sin and fall short of God’s mark.

Benjamin Franklin had a list of 12 virtues he practiced that he said led to moral perfection:

1. TEMPERANCE. Eat not to dullness; drink not to elevation.
2. SILENCE. Speak not but what may benefit others or yourself; avoid trifling conversation.
3. ORDER. Let all your things have their places; let each part of your business have its time.
4. RESOLUTION. Resolve to perform what you ought; perform without fail what you resolve.
5. FRUGALITY. Make no expense but to do good to others or yourself; i.e., waste nothing.
6. INDUSTRY. Lose no time; be always employ’d in something useful; cut off all unnecessary actions.
7. SINCERITY. Use no hurtful deceit; think innocently and justly, and, if you speak, speak accordingly.
8. JUSTICE. Wrong none by doing injuries, or omitting the benefits that are your duty.
9. MODERATION. Avoid extreams; forbear resenting injuries so much as you think they deserve.
10. CLEANLINESS. Tolerate no uncleanliness in body, cloaths, or habitation.
11.TRANQUILLITY. Be not disturbed at trifles, or at accidents common or unavoidable.
12. CHASTITY. Rarely use venery but for health or offspring, never to dulness, weakness, or the injury of your own or another’s peace or reputation.
13. HUMILITY. Imitate Jesus and Socrates.

One day a Quaker friend told him that Benjamin Franklin sure took a lot of pride in his moral perfection, so Ben added a 13th virtue: humility. Here is what Benjamin Franklin wrote about pride:

My list of virtues contain’d at first but twelve; but a Quaker friend having kindly informed me that I was generally thought proud; that my pride show’d itself frequently in conversation; that I was not content with being in the right when discussing any point, but was overbearing, and rather insolent, of which he convinc’d me by mentioning several instances; I determined endeavouring to cure myself, if I could, of this vice or folly among the rest, and I added Humility to my list).

In reality, there is, perhaps, no one of our natural passions so hard to subdue as pride. Disguise it, struggle with it, beat it down, stifle it, mortify it as much as one pleases, it is still alive, and will every now and then peep out and show itself; you will see it, perhaps, often in this history; for, even if I could conceive that I had compleatly overcome it, I should probably be proud of my humility.

Pride is something we all suffer from. If we think we do not suffer from pride, then it is possible pride is blinding us to our pride. Pride is real easy to recognize in others, though, isn’t it? It’s because when we see pride in somebody else, we’re smugly saying, *I* don’t suffer from pride like *he* does. Like Benjamin Franklin, we are being proud of our humility.

C.S. Lewis has this to say about pride:

According to Christian teachers, the essential vice, the utmost evil, is pride. Unchastity, anger, grief, drunkenness, and all that, are mere flea-bites in comparison; it was through pride that the devil became the devil; pride leads to every other vice: it is the complete anti-God state of mind… In God you come up against something which is in every respect immeasurably superior to yourself. Unless you know God as that- and, therefore know yourself as nothing in comparison- you do not know God at all. As long as you are proud you cannot know God. A proud man is always looking down on things and people and, of course, as long as you are looking down, you cannot see Something that is above you.

So how do we recognize pride in ourselves? How do we know when our own pride is blinding us to our own pride? Jacob, the Archbishop of Nizhegorod of the Russian Orthodox Church, wrote this about how to recognize pride within oneself:

“In order to understand and recognize [pride], notice how you feel when those around you do something against your will. If within you there arises not the thought of meekly rectifying the mistake of others, but discontent and anger, then know that you are extremely proud. If even the smallest lack of success in your affairs oppresses you, so that the thought of the participation of God’s Providence in our affairs does not cheer you up, then know that you are extremely proud. If you are wrapped up in your own needs and cold towards the needs of others, then know that you are extremely proud. If the sight of others’ misfortune, particularly that of your enemies, makes you merry, while the unexpected good fortune of those around you makes you sad, then know that you are extremely proud. If you are offended even by the slightest remarks concerning your shortcomings, while praises of your imaginary worth seem wonderful and admirable to you, then know that you are extremely proud.”

Pride is being “full of yourself.” Pride is saying, “it’s all about me.” Pride is saying, “I am better than you” or saying “you’re worse than I am.” The opposite of pride is being full of the Holy Spirit. The opposite of pride is saying, “it’s all about God.” The opposite of self-centered pride is humility.

The opposite of pride is not, as some people seem to think, low self-esteem. Pride is thinking too highly of yourself. Low self-esteem is thinking too lowly of yourself. Humility is not thinking of yourself at all; humility is thinking of others.

How do we replace pride with humility? God provides the answer with the fruit of the Holy Spirit which includes humility. Ask the Lord to show you your own pride. When you speak to others, do you speak down to them? Are you focused on your own feelings, or are you focused on the feelings of others? Do you belittle people and tell them what’s wrong with them? That’s pride talking. Instead, lift up people with your words and actions. Tell people about their strength and what you admire about them instead of what you don’t like about them. Don’t try to put them down or put yourself up; leave that to the Lord. James 4:10 says, “Humble yourselves in the sight of the Lord, and He shall lift you up.” Proverbs 11:2 says, “When pride comes, then comes disgrace, but with humility comes wisdom.”

So where is Edom today? No, really, where is Edom today? You don’t know, either? They soared like eagles, they built their nest among the stars, but in Obadiah 1:5, the Lord says he will obliterate Edom and there will be nothing left. If thieves break into your house, they steal what they want but they still leave something behind. But the Lord says of Edom nothing, nothing at all will be left. Where is Edom? By the time we get to the book of Malachi, Edom is gone. In the book Malachi, God tells Israel that He loves them even though Israel deserves punishment. Malachi 1:2-5 says

“I have loved you,” says the LORD.

“But you ask, ‘How have you loved us?’

“Was not Esau Jacob’s brother?” the LORD says. “Yet I have loved Jacob, but Esau I have hated, and I have turned his mountains into a wasteland and left his inheritance to the desert jackals.”

Edom may say, “Though we have been crushed, we will rebuild the ruins.” But this is what the LORD Almighty says: “They may build, but I will demolish. They will be called the Wicked Land, a people always under the wrath of the LORD. You will see it with your own eyes and say, ‘Great is the LORD -even beyond the borders of Israel!’

In 164 BC, Judas Maccabeeus overthew the nation of Edom and by the time of Christ, Edom no longer existed. The last recorded Edomite in the bible tried to kill Christ as an infant. Herod, descendent of Edom, still suffering from pride.

God’s will is not subject to man’s will. Pride tells us we can tell God what to do, but God will do as He pleases, and God invites us to participate. God always fulfills His promises. He promised to demolish Edom, and Edom is no more. God is sovereign, God is all powerful. Obadiah in the first verse recognizes this by calling God “the Sovereign LORD” or “Lord GOD” depending on your translation. The Hebrew is “Adonai Yahweh.” Adonai means “Lord or Master” and acknowledges that God is the Lord over all creation. Yahweh or Jehovah is the personal, covenant name for God, and means “the one who is”. God is absolute and God is unchangeable. By putting “Adonai” and “Yahweh” together, Obadiah recognizes God both as ruler of the universe as well as the personal ruler of the people of Judah.

Adonai Yahweh. Adonai Jehovah. Everlasting, unchanging God of Creation, and everlasting God of me. God hasn’t changed. When God says he hates pride, God still hates pride. And God will defeat pride. Those that ignore God and consider themselves superior to God, they will have their Day of Judgment. For believers in Christ, Christ will deliver us from our pride if we trust in Him. Obadiah 1:17-18 says,

But on Mount Zion will be deliverance; it will be holy,
and the house of Jacob will possess its inheritance.

The house of Jacob will be a fire
and the house of Joseph a flame;
the house of Esau will be stubble,
and they will set it on fire and consume it.
There will be no survivors from the house of Esau.”
The LORD has spoken.

Our deliverance has come if we put our trust in Jesus. Jesus is our deliverance. What is keeping us from acknowledging Jesus as Lord? Some believe that becoming a Christian will restrict their freedom; they will no longer be able to party like they want to. The irony is that it is the Christians who are free, and those that want to party are slaves to that desire. They do not want to give up their freedom because of selfish reasons. They – we – believe we know better than God. We are full of pride.

As we have learned from our study today, God hates the pride that is in each and every one of us, the sin of sins that tells us we can go our own way. Practice today serving humbly and lifting up each other, for it is in humble obedience to the Lord that brings us wisdom. And above all, rest in the sovereign promise of the Lord God that He will deliver us.