Boycott Ford

There are now 20+ pro-family groups boycotting Ford because of Ford’s enthusiastic support of gay marriage. It looks like it’s having an effect on Ford’s bottom line:

As the boycott of the Ford Motor Company picks up steam, the automaker continues to help finance homosexual organizations pushing same-sex “marriage.”

More than 20 pro-family groups are currently boycotting Ford, which also makes Jaguar, Volvo, Land Rover, Mazda, Lincoln and Mercury. The American Family Association, which initiated the boycott, has learned that Ford dealers recently met with corporate officials, and the boycott’s effect on sales was the major topic of discussion.

In fact, while Ford’s financial difficulties are not new, the company’s woes appear to be accelerating. The automaker’s sales dropped 5 percent in March and 7 percent in April, and Ford’s stock has dropped more than 14 percent since the boycott began, reaching the lowest price in nearly 20 years.

This weekend, Ford is financially sponsoring Motor City Pride in Ferndale, Michigan, complete with a same-sex “commitment ceremony” to make a “political statement.” Ford also financially supports pro-homosexual political such as the Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation, the Human Rights Campaign, the Gay, Lesbian Straight Education Network, and the Parents, Families and Friends of Lesbians and Gays.

Sure, Ford has the right to support a pro-homosexual agenda. And pro-family groups have the right to boycott them. But shareholders are already asking why support of a pro-gay agenda should take precedent over increasing car sales.

By the way, I’m planning on buying a new car this fall, and I won’t be buying Ford.

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9 thoughts on “Boycott Ford

  1. Michael, if you wouldn’t mind, just for curiosity’s sake, what sections of the Bible spell out that homosexuality is wrong? I don’t need all of them, just maybe, the first 2 or 3 that stand out in your mind. I just want to know what the Bible says on this issue.

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  2. Romans 1:24-27 and 1 Corinthians 6:9-10 to start. I’ll save you the effort of looking it up:

    Romans 1:24-27
    Therefore God gave them over in the sinful desires of their hearts to sexual impurity for the degrading of their bodies with one another. They exchanged the truth of God for a lie, and worshiped and served created things rather than the Creator—who is forever praised. Amen.

    Because of this, God gave them over to shameful lusts. Even their women exchanged natural relations for unnatural ones. In the same way the men also abandoned natural relations with women and were inflamed with lust for one another. Men committed indecent acts with other men, and received in themselves the due penalty for their perversion.

    and

    1 Corinthians 6:9-10
    Do you not know that the wicked will not inherit the kingdom of God? Do not be deceived: Neither the sexually immoral nor idolaters nor adulterers nor male prostitutes nor homosexual offenders nor thieves nor the greedy nor drunkards nor slanderers nor swindlers will inherit the kingdom of God.

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  3. I would like to thank you for the time in posting your response. I am very greatful. I spent the weekend pondering your quotes from the Bible, and studied Romans as well. I will leave Corinthians for later, so I will focus on Romans for now.

    I want to begin by quoting Romans 2:1 “Therefore you are inexcusable O man, to judge your neighbor: for in judging your neighbor, you condemn yourself; for even you who judge practice the same things yourself.”

    This is one of the core teachings I have taken from Jesus, and the New Testament. One that I balance all paradoxes against, as well as love your neighboer and such.

    What I take from Romans is that yes, people sin in many different ways, and each of us are guilty of it. However, our sin is answerable only to God through Jesus, correct? That is we must pay to him, and him alone.

    Yet, I also take that God shall deal with all sinners in their own way at time of their judgement, and it is not of our concern for someone elses sins. Our concern is our own sin, and seeking forgiveness for that sin. And it is through our sin that we understand it and drive towards a better state of being by conquering our sin.

    However, is not an organized boycott against people that sin a specific way contradictory of the statement I quoted above in not judging others, and leaving that judgement to God.

    As far as I know, Judgement Day has not arrived, so how can we judge others of their sin, when we each ourselves are still guilty of our own. Though the sin may be different, sin is still sin.

    In my view, we have a right to sin, not because we choose to, but we a human, and prone to err, and we each have the right to learn from that error free of judgement of others. Judgement solves nothing except create annimosity, especially if the righteous act is done out of spite.

    The essence of the Ford issue above is that these organized acts of “Judgement” run close to the line of throwing stones.

    People must come to terms with the error of their ways, and while people that are in the midst of their inner battles between the Tru and False selves, righteous attacks only create reactionary defense mechanisms within those sinners that are natural reflexes built in to all of our Ego’s. So, animosity reigns.

    Groups like the AFA are actively instigating this judgement upon them. If they are sinner, who are we to condemn them, and cast them out. OR deny them the right of their own Free Will.

    This is one of the hardest lessons I ever had to learn. To let sinners sin, but still love them as brothers and sisters none the less, even though I desired and felt I needed to help them. But learning that my responsibility is there to lend them a hand, but not take the learning steps for them. Otherwise, they will not learn their lesson.

    It’s easy to say we still love them as brother’s and sisters, but when faced with addressing them, to we cast up our noses ingoring them, or look at them with, “Don’t worry, you’ll figure it out. God still Love’s you.”

    Also, I feel Romans is the words of Paul interpretting his understanding of the teachings of Jesus, as with Corinthians, and I feel that it should be looked as in that way. I feel Paul was getting at that we must stay our own righteous course, but not segregate ourselves from those that we feel sin against God. Because it is much easier to see someone else’s sin then see our own, especially if we become overly righteous against sin to the point that that is all we see in others, and not the aspects of the divine that actually are shining in them.

    I believe the AFA, if they are trully Christian, and trully wanting to remedy all forms of Sin do themselves an injustice, and make matters far more worse then better, even though they may feel they are doing the righteous thing. They are falling into what I call a Spirit Trap, that is where our Ego tricks us into believing we are doing God’s wishes, yet in reality, we are dividing ourselves from others because we feel we are more righteous then them, so we are better. I’m not saying you or I do this, but it is something that can occur.

    I for one, cannot judge drunkards, or prostitutes, idolators, homosexuals, etc. for their sin because I know I have my own sins I am dealing with and have no right to condemn them, that is for God, and God alone. Yet I feel that Christian tendencies (just noting an observation) in their approach to those that sin are more discriminatory in nature then forgiving or loving. If anything, they are loving with conditions. How does that help a sinner deal with their sin if they feel condemned by fellow children of God? As a sinner, I would wish that people would understand I am doing the best I can, but overcoming sin is not easy. It seems with sin, people are guilty until proven innocent. And what you may see as sin may not be what God sees, because god know all of the sinner, yet we each only see small moment of them.

    You may say that all you have to do is realease that sin to Jesus Christ, but most humans follow habit, and will err again, and again, until they get it right.

    Do you see what I am saying?

    Thanks

    Keith

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  4. Well, Keith, that’s an incomplete view of what the bible says about judging. Yes, it says to “judge not,” but it’s also replete with examples of judging. The core teachings of Jesus (as spoken by Jesus himself) are to love God with all your heart, then love your neighbor as yourself. If your neighbor is hurting himself, are you not a better neighbor by being honest and telling him?

    If you feel that the core teaching is “judge not,” then you have already violated it, for in telling me what *you* think is right and wrong, you have judged me. One must take all the teachings to get a full biblical worldview.

    You are correct that each of us is answerable only to God, but not to the extent that we refuse to be our brother’s keeper. You are incorrect in that it is not our concern at all. I wrote not too long ago on accountability that may shed some light on this.

    As Judgement Day approaches, I would like to see as many of my neighbor’s saved from eternal torment. That’s not judging, that’s agape love. A boycott against those who promote evil recognizes that loving my neighbor means sharing my faith and encouraging righteousness means speaking out against evil. To keep silent is hypocritical.

    Your belief of letting people sin in ignorance is far more representative of the Hindu “karma” belief of not helping those that are suffering, that they somehow deserve their suffering.

    Your admonissions against the AFA pronouncing judgment is sound, and they do risk judgment brought against them. It behooves them, therefore, to makes sure they do not have a plank in their eye, that they are not sinning the same way. If the AFA is innocent of wrongdoing and guilty only of encouraging righteousness, then there is no reason to fear judgement.

    In this particular case, I do not judge an individual homosexual. It’s not my place to judge whether their salvation is secured. But it *is* my place to teach, rebuke, admonish (2 Timothy 3:16-17 and tell them what God says about homosexuality. Then it’s my responsibility to love them as my neighbor, whether they choose to go on sinning or not.)

    Christians have a saying, “Love the sinner, hate the sin.”

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  5. “If your neighbor is hurting himself, are you not a better neighbor by being honest and telling him?”

    Of course, it is your duty, however, you must be difficult to not let a righteous Ego get in the way that causes you to talk down to them. We are all guilty of that, even myself. We just need to be aware of it. But guiding them is all we can do. They have to make the choice by themselves, and not feel coerced.

    “If you feel that the core teaching is “judge not,” then you have already violated it, for in telling me what *you* think is right and wrong, you have judged me.”

    Definitely, the eternal spiritual paradox we all have to deal with. We all strive to not judge, and see each moment unbiased to our Egos, but when that Ego feels that it is being infringed upon, then judgement begins to take over, and causes us to say and do things we regret. But it leads me to the next one.

    “A boycott against those who promote evil recognizes that loving my neighbor means sharing my faith and encouraging righteousness means speaking out against evil. To keep silent is hypocritical.”

    If you wish to boycott, go ahead. However, to have laws based upon your spiritual/moral beliefs that may infringe upon others rights to live their life as they please, that’s a different story. And that is where boycotts usually evolve towards. As for keeping silent being hypocritical, you are correct again, and it is why I am talking to you.

    “Your belief of letting people sin in ignorance is far more representative of the Hindu “karma” belief of not helping those that are suffering, that they somehow deserve their suffering.”

    Not quite. What I refer to is that people need to come to an understanding of their own suffering, free of coercion. If you force someone to be straight as opposed to being homosexual, then that person will miss the lesson that God has brought to them, because God reveals himself to each of us in different ways, and sometimes that can be through different ways of life.

    As for Karma, it’s not about someone deserving their suffering. Karma, though often times misinterpreted as, does not mean you get what you deserve, or what comes around goes around. It has a deeper meaning in that karma is a spiritual and energetic bond that we consiously create connecting ourselves to a sense of materialism, whether spiritual, physical, emotional, or mental, that chains our soul to maya, or illusion. ALso, good karma is just as inconvenient as bad karma, because even good Karma can attach you to something material, and keep you from evolving towards the divine.

    For example: If I steal something you that you hold dear, and I am caught, and you realize it is me, a bond of karma is created between us. To release that bond requires both of our efforts, or else it enslaves us to materialism. First, I have to acknowledge my wrong doing, and honestly, as you for forgiveness, and then you must whole-heartedly accept that forgiveness. I do not ask for forgiveness, or you do not give forgiveness, we are energeticly bonded. That bond is like a chain. We both need to release it, but that is never easy.

    Also, as positive karma, you ask me to help you move furniture into your new house. I say yes, but deep down I am doing it because I feel I will be able to ask you to return the favor later, and that is the only reason I am doing it, then that is positive Karma, and also keeps me and you form the divine, because the love is conditional. If you don’t help me later, I will become hurt, and begin to resent you.

    A soul ultimately seeks to release themselves of all Karma, but that Karma is placed upon ourselves, by ourselves. SO, in a sense if it appears we are suffering, it is because of our own will. It doesn’t mean we abandon them, or cast them out, but continue to show them love unconditionally. The issue comes from when we put all our effort into helping them, and the don’t get it, then we attach ourselves to that karma, and that karma grows. It is a fine line that needs to be walked.

    As for the AFA, they are creating bonds of Karma that will need to be released.

    I do have one questions for you. WHy do Christians always refer to themselves as God-fearing? Why do you fear God?

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  6. Thanks for the warning. My motives are not due to a righteous ego, though.

    “If you wish to boycott, go ahead. However, to have laws based upon your spiritual/moral beliefs that may infringe upon others rights to live their life as they please, that’s a different story.”

    No, it’s not. Those that believe a homosexual lifestyle is not immoral are not abiding by that rule and have no qualms about arranging their own boycotts based on their morals. If I keep silent, those morals are being imposed upon the society in which I live. In other words, somebody’s morals are going to guide our society. I prefer those that are guided by judeo-christian values rather than the ones guided by Mardi Gras and Gay Pride.

    “If you force someone to be straight as opposed to being homosexual…” Straw man alert. I have forced no such thing on anybody, nor have I advocated such. If you choose to sin, that’s your business, your salvation, however you choose to believe. I do not agree that only those with amoral values are allowed to set guidelines for our society and write the laws to suit their whim. Supporting a boycott against a company for actively supporting homosexuality is not the same thing as forcing somebody to be straight. I am not in favor of passing laws banning homosexuality, but I am in favor of discouraging homosexuality and opposing laws recognizing homosexual relationships.

    As for the discussion on karma, I’ll accept your explanation. I do not believe in karma and it’s apparent you are more versed in it.

    “God-fearing” is a term of respect; you may liken it to obeying your father when you were young. I had a healthy fear that my father would punish me if I did not obey; not fearing him would lead to a self-indulgent child. My post yesterday discussed it somewhat:

    Job “feared God and shunned evil.” This doesn’t mean he was a coward; a fear of God is necessary for good spiritual discipline. Proverbs 1:7 says “The fear of the LORD is the beginning of knowledge, but fools despise wisdom and discipline.” Oswald Chambers, in a book called “My Utmost for His Highest,” wrote “The remarkable thing about fearing God is that when you fear God you fear nothing else, whereas if you do not fear God you fear everything else.”

    In other words, it’s an acknowledgment that God is powerful and sovereign.

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  7. “Thanks for the warning. My motives are not due to a righteous ego, though.”

    I don’t think they are either, but know, my comments are always generalized, or at least, that is the intent. 🙂

    “If I keep silent, those morals are being imposed upon the society in which I live. In other words, somebody’s morals are going to guide our society. I prefer those that are guided by judeo-christian values rather than the ones guided by Mardi Gras and Gay Pride.”

    I see and understand your point. But your last sentence is what I am talking about, you automatically classify that in which you are opposed into the worst polar opposite. Thus, classifying you J-C values over them, yet, the gay lifestyle is not all wham bam thank you mam. Most of my friends that live that life-style are very discreet about it, and some of the most loving, honest and understanding people I know, harming none. You feel their morals are being imposed upon you, but how do you think they have felt being oppressed all this time. Homosexuality is not new. Of course they are going to celbrate a sense of freedom. Just like CHristians did when Constantine took control over Rome under their banner. Try looking at it from their perspective. How do you like being told by Muslim fanaticals that you are an infidel and going to hell. If Iran finally recognize Christianity as a true religion and gave them freedom of fear, do you not think there would be Christian Pride in Iran’s streets.

    How does homosexuality harm you directly? Why does it matter to you if two men or women wish to validate their love for one another in their own way? And do it without quoting the Bible. I want your own words.

    “If you force someone to be straight as opposed to being homosexual…” Straw man alert. I have forced no such thing on anybody, nor have I advocated such.”

    I am merely trying to get you to use you imagination. Get outside of yourself, and look back. But mostly, when I use the word, “You”, it is generalized. Have you never tried to imagine that you agreed with the opposing side simply to understand it better? I’m not cutting you, just curious.

    “As for the discussion on karma, I’ll accept your explanation. I do not believe in karma and it’s apparent you are more versed in it.”

    I seriously recommend you reading up on it. It’s a wonderful understanding that strengthens how one sees unconditional love, and it has many relations with Christianity. Plus, talking about karma finally made me feel our conversation was not one sided. Learning about karma will not threaten your belief in Christianity, in fact, I would say, knowing you, it would be a good perspective to have a deeper relation with Jesus. Not saying that you don’t, cause I see you do, but it is always good to have an external validation of your belief.

    “God-fearing” is a term of respect”

    I guess that I feel that if I was God-fearing, though I’m not sure when to take J-C spiritual views as literal and metaphorical, always seemed to me a weakness not on my part, but of God. If God needs to instill fear for me to follow his rules, then, I think he needs a visit from Nanny 911. 🙂

    “The fear of the LORD is the beginning of knowledge, but fools despise wisdom and discipline.”

    You see, I would say that love of the Lord is the beginning of knowledge. If it begins in fear, it will always have it’s roots there, but in love, it will have roots in love.

    Keith

    PS. Is it sacreligious to highlite a Bible. 🙂

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