Thus Spake His Navel

It’s as good a title as any.

Some time ago, I wrote a book review on The Grand Weaver by Ravi Zacharias. A book I enjoyed immensely, about how we can only see the individual threads in God’s grand tapestry, but our thread is important. It was all about following God’s will for us.

I got an email from a fellow that begins, “I came across your blog via a browse on the awful Ravi Zacharias.” Uh, oh, I’m thinking. Describing the author as “awful” cannot be good. It turns out that was nearly the only sentence I understood in his email. In rebuttal, this John Forth is encouraging me to read “Divine Revelation of Avatar Adi Da Samraj” instead and he helpfully includes Chapter 7 for me to read. Here’s a sample paragraph:

God Is You (Perfectly Prior To Your Apparently objective conditional self, and Perfectly Prior To Your Apparently subjective conditional self, and, Therefore, Perfectly Prior To Your Total, Complex, and Merely Apparent conditional self).

The conditional self and the worlds of the conditional self Are Not Created By God, Nor Were (or Are) the conditional self (itself) and the worlds of the conditional self (themselves) Perfect Originally, Nor Will (or Can) It Ever Be The Case That God (or, Otherwise, the conditional self, itself, or the worlds of the conditional self, themselves) Will Perfect the conditional self (itself) or the worlds of tILe conditional self (themselves). But Only God Is Perfect, and God Is Perfection (or The Perfect Itself). Therefore, the conditional self and the worlds of the conditional self May Evolve conditionally, but Only To Possible conditional Degrees (Forever Less Than Perfection Itself, Which Is The Condition Only Of God), and This Through The Struggle Made By The Submission Of the lesser (or the lower) imperfect (or the lesser, or the lower, conditional) To the greater (or the higher)imperfect (or the greater, or the higher, conditional). And the conditional self and the worlds of the conditional self May, Otherwise, Devolve conditionally, but Also Only To Possible conditional Degrees (and Never To The Degree Of Absolute, or Irreversible, or More Than Illusory Separation From God, or From The Perfect Itself, Which Is God), and This Through The Struggle Made By The Submission Of the greater (or the higher) or the lesser (or the lower) imperfect (or the greater, or the higher, or the lesser, or the lower, conditional) To the even lesser (or the even lower) forms of the imperfect (or the conditional) itself. Nevertheless, and Whatever The (Relatively Evolved, or Relatively Devolved) Case May Be, The Only Way To Realize God (or The Inherently Perfect, and Perfectly Subjective, Self-Condition Itself) Is To progressively (or, However, Utterly) Surrender the imperfect itself (or the conditional self, and the worlds of the conditional self) To and Into God (or The Very, and Only, and Perfectly Subjective, and Inherently Perfect Person, or Self-Condition, That Is God), and, Ultimately (and Inherently, and Inherently Perfectly), To Transcend the imperfect (or the conditional self and the worlds of the conditional self) In (and By Inherent, and Inherently Perfect, and perfectly Subjective Identification With) The Very, and Only, and Perfectly Subjective, and Inherently Perfect Person, or Self-Condition, That Is God.

So, I asked Sean to diagram that sentence to help me understand if there are any coherent thoughts in there. Sean replied, “Thus spake his navel.”

Ah. That makes far more sense than the original paragraph. If *you* can make sense of that, I applaude your superior reading comprehension skills.

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8 thoughts on “Thus Spake His Navel

  1. I read it using a strobe light and a few adult beverages and it (for the most part) says that spongebob is a goofy goober. Who lives under a pineapple under the sea.

    Like

  2. Stephen, I need a copy of your translation dictionary. If I understand the poster correctly, you are God so you should have one. Also, I believe Spongebob would qualify as God.

    Jo, would you like the rest of the email? 🙂

    Like

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